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Full text of "A pictorial and descriptive guide to Aberdeen, Deeside, Donside, Strathspey, Cruden Bay, Huntly, Banff, Elgin, etc"

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of tbe 

'XTlntvcreit^ of Toronto 

M.A., O.C.L. 



Head Office: London Chief Office: 

1, DALE ST., LIVERPOOL. 1, CORNHILL, E.C.3 

Branches and Agencies throughout the WorUl. 
General Manager & Secretary : HUGH LEWIS. 



National 
Provincial 

Bank 
Limited. 



Head Office : 1 5, BISHOPSCATE, LONDON, E.C.2 



OVER 1,100 OFFICES in ENGLAND & WALES. 
AGENTS EVERYWHERE. 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES and LETTERS OF CREDIT 

issued available throughout the 
UNITED KINGDOM and in all parts of this WORLD 



Affiliated Banks: 

COUTTS & CO. 
GRINDLAY & CO., LTD. 



ASSOCIATED BANKS : 
Bank of British West Africa, Limited. 
Lloyds and National Provincial Foreign Bank, Limited. 
P. & 0. Banking Corporation, Limited. 
The British Italian Banking Corporation, Limited. 




Motorists and Tourists 

A Customer of the Westminster Bank, 
who provides himself with the Bank's 
Letter of Credit, ma}' travel throughout 
the United Kingdom with no more loose 
money in his pocket than is necessary to 
meet his requirements from hour to hour. 
By this means he greatly reduces the risk 
of loss, and ensures the ability to obtain 
cash in every town throughout England, 
Scotland, and Wales. The Bank makes 
no charge for this service. The holder 
pays for his Letter at its face value 
and any amount unused is credited 
back in full on the return of the 
document to the Bank. Let- 
ters of Credit are issued 
through any of the 
branches 




WESTMINSf ER BANK 



LIMITED 



Head Office - 

41 Lothbury, London, E. C. 2 



Assets Exceed S®^^^^^ Claims Paid b 




B £10,000,000 LlfflDdft! Over £25,000,000 § 

B 
B 
B 

BY APPOINTMENT B 

generalI 



ACCIDENT FIRE & LIFE 

Ltd. 



| Assurance Corporation, L } d . 

§ Established 1885. 



WORLD WIDE INSURANCES 

FOR 

TOURISTS & TRAVELLERS. 



B 



B 
B 
B 



The Leading British § 

** B 

Motor Insurance Office. 



FIRE BONUS POLICIES. B 

B 
B 



Chief Offices : g 

General Buildings, PERTH, SCOTLAND. f| 

General Buildings, ALDWYCH, LONDON WC" 8 

, . g 

OFFICES IN ALL THE LEADING CITIES I 

THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. § 

B § 

B Director and General Manager, F. Norie-Miller t p B 



Series, 1926-27] 



LONDON, W.C.I. 



WHITE HALL 

RESIDENTIAL HOTELS 

RL'SSELL SQUARE (Close to the British Museum) 



WHITE HALL. BLOOMSBURY SQUARE. 
Nos. 2. 3, 4 & 5, MONTAGUE STREET. 
Nos. 70. 71 & 72. GUILFORD STREET. 
Nos. 21 & 22. MONTAGUE STREET. 
Nos. 15 & 16. BEDFORD PLACE. 
Nos. 18, 19&20, MONTAGUE STREET. 
Nos. 22 & 23, CORAM STREET. 
No. 13. WOBURN PLACE. 

TERMS ON APPLICATION to the 
MANAGERESS AT EACH HOTEL 




INDEPENDENT & ESCORTED 
TOURS & CRUISES 

Arranged to meet all requirements. 

BANKING AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE. 

Travellers' Cheques. Passengers' Mail Department. 
Passports and Visas Obtained. 

STEAMSHIP PASSAGES BOOKED . 

Aerial Travel and Motor Coach Tours. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED PROGRAMME. 

DEAN 81 DAWSON, LTD. 

7, Blandford Square, N.W.1. 

PARI8. MARSEILLES, MENTONE, NEW YORK, & all PRINCIPAL TOWNS. 



t Somdhin q New in Moto r Coachinq 

Introducing the'S I LENT-CU ! DE" 

%1/ZCKlE SOX sfDDS ONE MORE JOY 
TO THE UOYS OF THE OPEN ROAD. 



¥ 




SILENT-GUIDE 

PATENTED REC. TRADE MARK. 
A NOVEL INVENTION COUPLED 
WITH SPECIALLY PREPARED 
ITINERARIES FOR IMPARTING & 
RETAINING INFORMATION IN A. 
PARTICULAR k PLEASING MANNER 
ABOUT THE MANY PLACES OF INTEREST 
YOU MAY EITHER VISIT OR PASS 
EN ROUTE ON YOUR FAVOURITE 
MOTOR COACH TOURS 



tJustwhat 

is wanted 

-to make - 

1 Motor (baching 

a success 



Mb need to be in ignorance ./Vo need to a*A_ 

TAe"SILENTCUIDE "tells you. SILENTLY 

of the places thr ough which you pass 
You will find it installed on the best- -__. __ _ _# 
Motor Coaches in most Holiday Resorts ASK FOR IT! 




206, REGENT STREET, LONDON, W. 

Chocolates, Ca?tdies and Cakes 

BRANCHES IN THE PROVINCES 



Brighton : 14 East Street 
Bristol : 24 College Green 
Cambridge : 48 Sidney Street 
Cheltenham : 8 The Promenade 
Chester : 27 Eastgate Street 
Dublin : 84 Grafton Street 
Eastbourne : 23 Terminus Road 
Edinburgh : 1 20 Princes Street 
Folkestone : 1 1 5 Sandgate RoaJ 
Glasgow : 99 Buchanan Street 
Guildford : 144 High Street 



Leeds : 32 Bond Street 
Lincoln : 9 Bailgate 
Liverpool : 33 Bold Street 
„ 10 Dale Street 

„ 1 Ranelagh Strecf 

Manchester : 42 King Street 
Oxford : 24 Commarket Street 
Plymouth : 50 George Street 
Southsea : 72 Palmerston Road 
Southend : 138 High Street 
Windsor : 14 Thames Street 



LIFE ASSURANCE PLUS — ! 

The Australian Mutual Provident Society is Mutual. That is to say, all 
Surplus, without deduction, belongs to the Policy-holders themselves and 
is distributed yearly. Moreover, the Society, established in 1849, has 
been tor many years the largest and most prosperous British Mutual Life 
Office. Why is this ? Because it offers to Assurers the Acme of Security 
and Profit, and because its satisfied members are its best advertisement. 
Why are policies with the A.M. P. Society so profitable ? Because, while 
its premium rates are below the average, it possesses in a unique degree 
the combination ot a low expense rate, a high interest return, and a 

favourable mortality experience. 

The A.M. P. Society should be covering you. You will be sent full 

particulars on application. Please mention this Publication. 



EVERY YEAR A BONUS YEAR. 



Assets £60,000,000. Annual Income, £8,900,000. 

New Ordinary Business for 1925, £13,750,000. 

Cash Surplus (Ordinary Department) divisible for 

1925, £22,428.221. 

AUSTRALIAN MUTUAL 
PROVIDENT SOCIETY 

London Office: 73-76, King William Street, E.C4. 

W. C. FISHER, Manager for the United Kingdom. 




WRECKS AND 
LOSS OF LIFE 

at sea are far more frequent round our coasts than 
is generally realised. The relief of shipwrecked 
persons and of the widows and orphans of those 
drowned has been provided for 87 years by 

The SHIPWRECKED MARINERS' SOCIETY 

which needs, and pleads for, continued public 
support. Will you send a contribution ? 

Patron H.M. THE KING. 

Bankers - ■ Williams Deacon's Bank, Limited. 

Secretary - GERALD E. MAUDE, Esq, 

Office: Carlton House, Regent St., London, S W.l. 



Temperance Permanent Building Society, 

4, 6&8, LUDGATE HILL, LONDON, E.C. 



Frompt Advances. Light Repayments. Easy Redemptions. 
Low Costs. 

ABSOLUTE SECURITY FOR INVESTORS. 

Shares, 4' 2 pep cent. Deposits, 4 per cent. 

RESERVE FUND exceeds £283,000. 

EDWARD WOOD. Manager. 

LOSE YOUR HOLIDAY 

YOUR LIFE SUFFERS. 
LOSE YOUR LIFE 

YOUR WIFE SUFFERS 

(AND YOUR CHILDREN ALSO). 

PROTECT THEM 

By INSURING with the 

Pearl Assurance Company, 

LIMITED, 

HIGH H0LB0RN, W.C.I. 

Accumulated Funds £38,200,000 

Claims Paid - - - £41,880,000 

G. SHRUBSALL, Managing Director. 



HACKBRIDGE BOARDING & QUARANTINE KENNELS 

20 minutes from Victoria, Southern Rly. (Brighton Section!. 

FULLY APPROVED UNDER THE MINISTRY OF 

AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS FOR 

IMFORTETJ DOGS. 

(Under the Management of the Committee of the Dogs' Home, Battersea.) 

These thoroughly Up-to-date Kennels are always available 

Sor the reception oi Dogs coming from Abroad or for 

BOARDERS, and are under the control of a resident 

~ ^^^^~ qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 

Terms for boarding imported dogs are from 8/- to 12/6 per week 

(including veterinary supervision), and full particulars may be obtained 

from — Inspection invited. 

G. GUY S. ROWLEY, Secretary, Dogs' Home, Hackbridge, Surrey. 

vi 




Aquascutum Weatherproofs For Every Purpose. 

Pure New Wool. Weatherproof. Self- Ventilating. 

Price from 6 guineas. 
" Field " Coats 3\ to 5 guineas. 

AQUASCUTUM, LTD., '"YoK 1 5? "■ 



To SUMMER TOURISTS, 

Visitors from Overseas and others. 

Store your Valuables, Jewellery, Deeds, Documents, &c, in the 

CHANCERY LANE SAFE DEPOSIT 

for Long or Short Periods. Terms : 5s. to 100 gns. 

Prospectus Free. Inspection Invited. 

Apply Managing Director, 

Chancery Lane Safe Deposit, 

61-62, Chancery Lane, London, W.C.2. 



WHEN' PACKING 



FOR YOUR HOLIDAYS 

be prepared for emergencies and put a packet of 

;]K#°f?£„" PAPER HANDKfi: 

in your case or haversack. They take up little space, 
are pleasing as silk, and, after use, destroyed like paper. 

At Chemists and Stores in Sealed Cartons of 50, 2/-, also " Toinoco 
Papier Crepon" Thicker, 50 for 1/9, or from Sole Proprietors, 

Dept. H.G., The Toinoco Handkerchief Co., Ltd., 55, Hatton Garden, E.C.I 



"/ was sick and ye visited me." 

THE EAST LONDON SEAMEN'S MISSION 

Regularly Visits Hospitals, Catering specially for Seamen, also the Men 
and their Families in their Homes. Many are the Testimonies received 
appreciative of these Visits. 

Gifts of Money, Fruit, Left-off Clothing and Boots may be sent to the 
Mission's Hon. Treasurer, C. I. SWAIN (Ex-Inspector Metropolitan 
Police), or to the General Secretary, The Rev. CHAS. H. LODGE, 
F.Ph.S., M.R.S.L. 

Mission Headquarters, 9, West India Dock Road, E.14 



HELP 

" The 300 FRESH cases 

C. . t - , r,each the 

hildren's N . S. P. C. C. 
Champion EVERY DAY. 

to bring laughter Continued support by Gift and 

instead of tears — Legacy is most earnestly asked 

health instead of n , , _ r __ , 

. . . , ,. Please send a GIFT, large or small, ac- 

siciuress into tne cording to your ability, to Sir Robert 

lives of ill-treated p a rr, O.B.E., Director, Victory House, 

little children. Leicester Square, London, W.C.2 
The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. 



Something Worth Knowing. 




A SAFE MEANS OF SAVING. 

50/ Interest (free of tax) on Snares at £25, or 
/O by Instalments of 5 - a month. 

/fO ' Interest ifree of tax) on Deposits of £1 
*i and upwards. 

Shares and Deposits may be withdrawn at short 
notice without deductions. All money so inves- 
ted is used to assist House-Purchase and House- 
Building by the 

CHURCH of ENGLAND 

TEMPERANCE AND GENERAL 

BUILDING SOCIETY 

i Incorporated 1882). 

£193,000 loaned to assist in securing Homesteads 
during 1925. 

Assets £490,000. Reserve Fund £37,000. 



Write Jor Prospectus (Depi. 25) to 

W. C. M. WIGHTMAN, Secretary, 

"Thriftdom," 26, King William Street, London, E.C.4. 

Telephone CENTRAL 5927. Telegrams, "THRIFTDOM, LONDON." 

LAW FIRE 

INSURANCE SOCIETY LIMITED, 

No. ii4, CHANCERY LANE, LONDON, W.C.2. 



FIRE. 

Capital Redemption. Personal Accident and Disease. Burglary. 

Fidelity Guarantee. Workmen's Compensation, including Domestic Servants. 

Property Owner's Indemnity. Third Party. Motor Car. Plate Glass. 

HOUSEHOLDERS' & HOUSEOWNERS' COMPREHENSIVE POLICIES. 

BONDS.— The Directors desire to draw special attention to 
the fact that the Fidelity Bonds of this Society are accepted by 
His Majesty's Government and in the High Court of Justice. 

CHARLES PLUMPTRE JOHaSON, Esq., J.P., Chairman. 

(Formerly of Johnson. Raymond-Barker & Co., Lincoln's Inn). 

ROMER WILLIAMS, Esq., D.L., J.P., Vice-Chairman. 

(Formerly of Williams & James), Norfolk House, Thames Embankment. 

Secretary— H. T. OWEN LEGGATT. 

Assistant Secretary— W. R. LAWRENCE. 

SECURITY UNSURPASSED. 

Every facility is afforded for the transaction of Insurance business on the most favour, 
able terms, and surveys, where necessary, are undertaken by the Society free of charge. 
Prospectuses and Proposal Forms and full information may be had at the Society's Office. 
The business of this Society is confined to the United Kingdom. 



Whilst enjoying your own holiday 

please remember the many thousands 
of poor and crippled children of the 

Shaftesbury Society & Ragged School Union 

(Founded 1844) 
who long to see the sea and the green fields. 
One Guinea will pay for a fortnight's holiday. 

Send your Cheque, Treasury Note or P.O. NOW 

To ARTHUR BLACK, Secretary, 
john kirk house, 
32, John street, 
london, w.c.i. 

Treasurers : j 

Edwin Dodd, Esq., Walter Scoles, Esq. J* 

Illustrated Annual Report sent /> 

upon request /-i_ 





*W- 



«■=* 






U : -,,7l 



BARTHOLOMEW'S MAPS. 

Besf ancf Most Up-to-date 

Maps Published. 

A Complete List of Maps and Plans of all Districts in 

England, Scotland, and Ireland, will be sent on receipt 

of request to the Publishers — 

JOHN BARTHOLOMEW & SON, Ltd., 
The Geographical Institute, EDINBURGH. 



DELICIOUS FRENCH 


COFFEE. 


RED 


WHITE 






& 


BLUE 


For Bi 


reakfast & after 


Dinner. 


In making, use 


LESS QUANTITY, it being so much stronger than 


ORDINARY COFFEE. 





THE QUEEN'S HOSPITAL 
FOR CHILDREN 

HACKNEY ROAD, LONDON, E.2, and LITTLE FOLKS HOME, BEXHILL. 

President = H.R.H. THE DUKE OF YORK, K.G. 

170 Beds. Has Larger Numbers of Out-Patients than any other Children's 
Hospital. Over 140,000 attendances of Sick and Injured Children annually. 

Endowment Income £1,800. Expenditure £36,000 a year. 

coi. Lord Wm. Cecil, C.V.O., Chairman. T. Glenton-Kerr, Sec. 

Bankers: liar^lavs, Lombari Street. 



INSURE WITH THE 

NORTHERN 

ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED. 

ESTABLISHED 1836. 

Head Offices .—LONDON : 1, Moorgate, E.C.2. 
ABERDEEN : 1, Union Terrace. 

Assets (1924) exceed £15,500,C00. 



FREE CHURCH TOURING GUILD. 

£13 7 6 17 days' LUGANO TOUR tor ITALIAN LAKES. 
.. ,. . ROME, FLORENCE AND VENICE TOUR, also 
£Z3 IU GRAND TOUR ROUND ITALY, no night travel, 
£37 15 0. 

EASTER HOLIDAYS. 

£8 8 io days' CLARENS, MONTREUX TOUR. 
£5 5 A Week in Bruges. 

.NEW SUMMER BOOKLET with 78 SWISS and BELGIAN TOURS 
sent on application. 

Secretary, 129. Memorial Hail. London, E.C.4.. 




DR. BARNARDO'S HOMES 

7,300 Children Need Your Help. 

WILL YOU SEND THEM 
HALF-A GROWN for FOOD ! 

Give Yourself the Joy of Helping to Feed One Destitute 
Little One. 

Cheques and Orders payable " Dr. Barnardo's Homes Food 

Fund," and crossed, may be addressed to Dr. Barnardo's 

Homes, 162, Barnardo House, Stepney Causeway, London, 

E.i. 



FOUNDED 1750. 



G. SHIPPAM, L TD 

"Chichester Brand" 

Meat and Fish Pastes, 
Soups, Ox Tongues, &c. 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN during her 
recent visit to SHIPPAM S FACTORY, 

personally accepted a Miniature Case, containing 
three dozen tiny jars of Paste, complete in everv 
detail, for "THE QUEENS DOLL'S HOUSE." 

SHIPPAM'S FACTORY is always open to 

Visitors, who may see the Ideal Conditions of 

the Works, and the Materials used. 

C. SHIPPAM, Limited, 

CHICHESTER, ENGLAND. * 




The convenience of having a 

PORTABLE 
ELECTRIC 
FLASHLAMP 

available is demonstrated a thousand 
times during the Tour. The 




EVE£-RMADY 

models are the recognised standards for quality 
and design, and can be depended on for reliable, 
efficient and lasting service. The Ever-Ready 
Spotlight Torch Will penetrate the blackest 
night and illuminate objects up to 500 feet. 



Every constructional feature of 

" EVER READY" BATTERIES 

for Wireless and general purposes is the best that 
modern research and experience cr.n produce. 
Our Illustrated Catalogue sent on request 
to Service Department E Y. 
The Ever-Ready Coy. (Gt. Brit.) Ltd., 
Hercules Place, Holloway, London, N.7 




of £<xo£cArv? 




T 



'HE wonderful delight and fascin- 
ation of an Eastern Fragrance 
are contained in ' Eastern Foam ' 
Vanishing Cream- ' Eastern Foam ' is 
the aid-to-beauty that once used is never 
deserted for any other. Exquisitely soft 
and silky to the touch, alluringly, but 
not too heavily perfumed, it fascinates 
not only the user, but all beholders. By 
the regular use of ' Eastern Foam ' a 
complexion free from all blemishes and 
roughness and redness can be obtained 
and maintained. 

Large Pots at 1,4. Neic Sample size 3d. Of all Chemists and Stores. 

Made only by The British Drug Houses, Limited, London, N.i. 



Use ' Kalosan ' Tooth Paste — as good as 'Eastern Foam.' 

I i 

(Eancer Hospital 



( FREE ) 

Incorporated under Royal Charter. Founded 1S51 . 

FULHAM ROAD, LONDON, S.W.3. 
NO LETTERS. NO PAYMENTS. 

The only Special Hospital in London for the Treatment of Cancer. 

Fully equipped and specially staffed for the better 
treatment and research into the Causes of Cancer. 

A certain number of beds are provided for advanced 
cases, who are kept comfortable and free from pain. 

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS, DONATIONS AND 
LEGACIES ARE EARNESTLY SOLICITED. 

Hankers : Coutts &Co., 440, Strand, W.C. 

J. Courtney Buchanan Secretary. 

II I III ■HHaillftllBllilll I IlllilHIWI IIIMIHIW IIBW 



ROYAL EXCHANGE 
ASSURANCE. 

INCORPORATED A.D. 1720 



Tourists' & Travellers' World-wide 
Accident Insurances. 



FIRE, LIFE, SEA, ACCIDENT 
and GENERAL INSURANCES. 

Apply for full particulars of all classes of Insurance to the Secretary. 

Head Office - - ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, E.C.3. 

or to any oj the Corporation' s branches or Agencies 
throughout the country. 



NURSE EASTHAUGH (Late Middlesex Hospital) has found 

Pinelyptus Pastilles an unfailing remedy _ wherever she has 

recommended them. 

PINELYPTUS PASTILLES 

(Broncho- Laryngeal) 



ASTHMA 

CATARRH 

COUGH 




CHEST 

THROAT 

VOICE 



A Boon ti Motorists, Travellers, Singers, Speakers, Teachers, S-c. 
1/3 per Box from Chemists and Stores. 

Proctor's Pinelvptus Depot, Newcastle-on -Tyne. 

sometimes to know where 
to stay. The Advertise- 
ments at front and end of 
this Guide will help you to \ 
solve the problem. 




1824-1926 

The Prince of Wales's Appeal 

FOR THE LIFE-BOAT SERVICE 

TO GREAT BRITAIN AND THE EMPIRE. 

" I would appeal to all, to whatever country they 
belong, to remember with gratitude what seafarers of 
their own race owe to British Life-boat men. 

" There is nothing in our long and splendid history 
as a seafaring race of which we have more right to be 
proud. We are proud that it -was the first in the 
world, and has been the example and model • for all other 
countries. Most of all we are proud that it is a 
voluntary service, provided and maintained, not by the 
State, but by the people themselves. 

" I appeal to the men and women of our Empire, 
and, indeed, to all those who value the practical 
example of heroism and humanity, to give generous! v in 
support of this great service." r-^ 

WILL YOU RESPOND 

by becoming one of our million 5/- subscribers 
and remembering the Life-boats in your Will ? 

Over 60,000 Lives Rescued from Shipwreck. 
1 1 Lives Every Week for 1 02 Years ! 

Lord Harrowby, George F Shee, M.A., 

Hon. Treasurer. Secretary. 

ROYAL NATIONAL LIFE-BOAT INSTITUTION, 

Life-boat House, 
22, Charing Cross Road, London, W.C.2. 



TM E 



STANDARD BANK 

OF SOUTH AFRICA, limited 

Bankers to the Government of the Union of South Africa; to the Imperial 

Government in South Africa, and to the Governments of Northern 

Rhodesia, Southern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, and Tanganyika. 



AUTHORISED CAPITAL £10,000,0 00 

SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL £8,916,680 

PAID-UP CAPITAL £2,229,165 

RESERVE FUND £2,883,335 

UNCALLED CAPITAL £6,687,495 

£11,809,995 



Head Offics : 
10, CLEMENTS LANE, LOMBARD STREET, 
and 77, KING WILLIAM ST., LONDON, E.C.4. 

LONDON WALL BRANCH : 63, London Wall, E.C.2. 
WEST END BRANCH: 9. Northumberland Avenue, W.C.2. 

NEW YORK AGENCY : 67, Wall Street. 

HAMBURG AGENCY: 

Bank of British West Africa, Ltd., 49-53, Schauenburger-strasse. 

Over 330 Branches, Sub-Branches and Agencies in South and East Africa. 



BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED IN ALL PARTS of the WORLD. 



EXECUTORSHIPS & TRUSTEESHIPS UNDERTAKEN. 



INCOME TAX.— Claims for Recovery of Income Tax Undertaken. 



Every facility afforded for the Development 

of Trade with all Parts of South and East 

Africa, the United States of America, and 

the Continent of Europe. 

Documentary Credits Ananqed. Enquiries Invited. 



The STANDARD BANK MONTHLY REVIEW is seat post free on application. 

It gives the latest information on all South and East African matters of 
Trade and Commercial Interest. 



BERTRAM LOWNDES, London Manager. 



To face half-title] 



Aberdeen 

& North-East Scotland 



DELIGHTFUL STEAMER TRIPS 

Through 90 Miles of Thames Scenery. 

Daily Service (Sundays excepted) from May to end of Septembers 




SALOON STEAMERS run daUy (Sundays excepted) 
between OXFORD, HENLEY, and KINGSTON. 



DOWN TRIP. 




UP TRIP. 




Oxford dept. . . 9.30 a.m. 


2.30 p.m. 


Kingston dep. . 9 a.m.; 


2.30 p.m. 


Wallingford arr.abt 1.45 p.m 


,6.30 p.m. 


Windsor arr. about 1.45 p.m., 


7.15 p.m. 


,. dept. abt. 2.45 p.m. 


9.0 a.m. 


dep. i. 2.45 p.m. 


9.30 a.m. 


Henley arr. about 7.0 p.m. 


1.30 p.m. 


Henley arr. „ 7.10 p.m. 


1.45 p.m. 


„ dep. „ 10.0 a.m. 


2.45 p.m. 


* dep. ;, 9.10 a.m. 


2.45 p.m' 


Windsor an. „ 1.45 p.m. 


6.50 p.m. 


Wallingford arr.,, 1.45 pjn. 


7.15 p.m. 


„ dep. „ 2.45 p.m. 


9.20 a.m. 


„ dep. „ 2.45 p.m. 


9.0 ajn. 


Kingston arr. „ 7 p. nil, 


1.30 p.m. 


Ortoid arr. „ 7.0 p.m.. 


1.10 p.m. 



The through journey occupies two days each wxy, but passengers can join or 
leave the boat at any of the locks or regular stopping places. In this most pleasant 
of ways visits can be made to many attractive and historic places such as Hamp- 
ton Court, Windsor, Maidenhead, Marlow, Henley, Pangbourne, Goring, Oxford, 
etc. Combined Rail and Steamer Bookings from many G.W.R. and L. & S.W.R. 
Stations. Time Tables giving full particulars of arrangements, fares, etc., post free. 
3d. 

ROWING BOATS of all kinds for Excursions down the River at 

Charges which include Cartage back to Oxford. 

STEAM AND M0T03 LAUNCHES for Hire by the Day or Week, 

and also for the Trip. 

Full particulars on application. 



BOATS, PUNTS, CANOES, SUITABLE FOR RIVERS, 
LAKES, PRIVATE WATERS. 

A large selection, both New and Second-hand, kept in readiness for 

Sale or Hire. Illustrated Price Lists may be had on application. 

HOUSE BOATS FOR SALE OR HIRE, & ALSO BUILT TO ORDER. 

SALTER BROS., Ltd., Boat Builders, 22 Folly Bridge, OXFORD. 



PLAN OF ABERDEEN 




WARD. LOCK, & CO., Ltd., Warwick House, Salisbury Square, LONDON 



HE 
?6U6 



A 

pictorial anb Descriptive (Suifce 



TO 



ABERDEEN, 

DEESIDE, DONSIDE, STRATHSPEY, 

CRUDEN BAY, HUNTLY, 
BANFF, ELGIN, Etc. 



PLAN OF ABERDEEN, TWO DISTRICT MAPS 
AND RAILWAY MAP OF SCOTLAND. 



UPWARDS OF FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FOURTH EDITION— REVISED. 




WARD, LOCK & CO., LIMITED, 

Warwick House, Salisbury Square, London, E.C.4. 
Also at Melbourne. 



" He that would bring homo the wealth of the Indies 
must carry the wealth of the Indies with him : so it is in 
travelling — a man must carry knowledge with him if he 
would bring home knowledge." 



MAPS AND PLANS 

Plan of Aberdeen ...... Frontispiece 

Scotland (Railway Map) ....... Faces p. g 

Perth and the Eastern Highlands . . . . ,, 41 

The North-East of Scotland „ 57 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Introduction — 

Scope of Book — An Attractive District — Angling, Golf, 
Cycling, etc. — Climate — Railway Routes — Sea Routes — 
Useful Hints — Hotels and Tariffs .... 9 

Aberdeen . . . . . . . . .17 

1. To the Links, the Brig o* Balgownie, and through the 

" Auld Toon " . . . . . . .21 

2. Through the New Town. ..... 30 

3. The Circular Tram Route . . . . .34 

4. Bridge of Dee, Duthie Park, and the Fish Market . 35 

5. Old Kirk of Nigg and Girdleness Lighthouse . . 38 

6. The Blue Hill 39 

Excursions from Aberdeen — 

To Stonehaven and Dunnottar Castle . . . -41 

To Laurencekirk, Fettercairn and Edzell ... 44 

By the Buchan Line : Ellon, Cruden Bay, and the Bullers 
of Buchan ........ 45 

To Peterhead . . . . . . . .51 

To Fraserburgh. ....... 53 



CONTENTS 



Deeside 



Banchory 

Abovne 

Ballater 

Balmoral 

Braemar 



DONSIDE AND THE VALE OF AlFORD 



Strathspey 

Craigellachie 
Aberlour . 
Ballindalloch 
Grantown . 
Nethybridge 
Boat of Garten 
Aviemore . 

Huntly . 



Banff and Macduff 



page 
55 
58 
62 
66 
76 
80 

89 

97 
104 
104 
105 
107 
113 
114 

115 
119 

124 



The Moray Firth Coast — 

Portsoy ......... 133 

Cullen 134 

Buckie 137 

Spey Bay . . . . . . . • 138 

Elgin, Lossiemouth and Fochabers .... 140 
For Motorists aud Cyclists . . . . . .151 

Index i55 

Directory of Hotels, Boarding Houses, Schools, Estate Agencies 

and Business Establishments in Great Britain and Ireland, 

see after p. 8 and at end. 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Municipal Buildings and 

City Cross . . .18 
Aberdeen Harbour . 19 

Union Street . . .22 
Queen's Cross ... 22 
Rosemount Viaduct . 22 
Brig o' Balgownie . . 23 
St. Machar Cathedral . 26 
King's College ... 26 
Union Terrace Gardens 27 
Marischal College, from 

an aeroplane . . 30 
East and West Churches 31 
Wallace Statue ... 32 
Harlaw Memorial . . 32 
Edward VII Statue . 32 
Gordon's College . . 33 
Old Bridge of Dee . . 38 
Beach and Bathing Station38 



New Bridge of Don 
Girdleness Lighthouse 
The Fish Market 
The Harbour 
Stonehaven . 
Dunnottar Castle 
Cruden Bay . 
The Coast at Slains 
Castle .... 



38 
39 
39 
39 

42 

43 



49 



Bullers of Buchan . 
Peterhead 
Fraserburgh . 
Bridge of Feugh, Ban 

chory 
Aboyne .... 
Ballater .... 
Lochnagar 
Balmoral .... 
Upper Garawalt Falls 

Braemar 
Crathie Church 
Old Bridge of Dee, In 

vercauld . 
Linn of Dee . 
Craigevar Castle 
Corse Castle . 
Ballindalloch Bridge 
Huntly Castle 
Bridge of Alvah, Banff 
Macduff .... 
Elgin Cathedral . 
West Towers . 
Pluscarden Priory . 
Spynie Palace 
Ladies' Walk, Elgin 
Sheriifmill, Elgin 



FACING 
PAGE 

51 
51 



62 
63 

68 
69 

76 

77 
77 

82 

83 

94 

94 

95 

128 

128 

129 

144 

144 

144 

145 

M5 

145 



WARD, LOCK & Co.'a 


GUIDE 


B O O X S 


ENGLAND AND WALES. 


Aberystwyth 


Leamington, Warwick, to. 


Aldeburgh-on-Sea 


Littlenampton and S.W. Sussex 


-.jslo-e? and North Wales 


Liverpool, Birkenhead, &c. 


Bangor, to. 


Llandrindod Wells, to. 


F ! .a/mouta, &c. 


Llandudno and N. Wales 


Barnstaple and N.W. Devon 


Llangollen, Corwen, Bala, to. 


Ssih, WeBx, to. 


Looe and South Cornwall 


SeUws-y-Coed, Sneddon, to. 


London and Environs 


■ Bediill and District 


Lowsstolt and District 


tidatord. Westward Ho ! to 


Lyme Regis and District 


Bognor and S.W. Sussex 


Lynton and Lynmouih 


Bournemouth and District 


Malvern and District 


Brecon and South Wales 


Margate and N.E. Zest 


Bridlington and District 


Matlock, Dovedale, &c. 


Bridport, West Bay, &c. 


Minehead, Ezmoor, &c. 


Brighton and Hove 


Newquay and '(. Cornwall 


Broads, The 


Nottingham and District 


Eroadstairs and H.E. Kent 


Paignton and S. Devon 


Bade and North Corn-rail 


Penmaenraawr. Llanlairfechan, to, 


Budleigh Salterton, &c. 


Penzance and West Cornwall 


Bnzton and Peak District 


Plymouth and S.W. Devon 


Canterbury and N.E. Kent 


Pwllheli and Cardigan Bay 


Cardiff and South Wale? 


Ramsgate, Sandwich, to. 


Carnarvon and North Wale*. 


Rhyl and N. Wales 


Channel Islands 


Ripon and District 


Chichester and S.W. Sussex 


St. Ives and W. Cornwall 


Clevedon and District 


Scarborough and District 


Colwyn Eay 


Sealord, Newhaven, to. 


Conway, Deganwy, to. 


Seaton and District 


Criccieth and Cardigan Bay 


Sheringham, Run ton, to. 


Cromer and District 


Sherwood Forest 


Dartmoor 


Sidmouth and S.E. Devon 


Dawiish and S.E. Devon 


8outhwold and District 


Deal, Walmnr, to. 


Stratlord-npon-Avon 


Dover, St. Margaret'! B»y, to. 


Swanage,- Co.-le, to. 


Dovercourt, Harwich, &o. 


Teignmocth and 8J5 Devoa 


Eastbourne, Sealord, to. 


Tenby and South Wales 


Exeter and S.E. Devon 


Thames, The 


Exmouth and District 


Torquay and District 


Falmouth and S. Cornwall 


Towyn, AberJovey, to. 


Felixstowe and District 


Wales, North (Northern Section) 


Filey and District 


Wales, North (Southern Section) 


Folkestone, Sandgate, to. 


Wales, South 


Fowey and South Cornwall 


Warwick, Konilworth, to. 


Harrogate and District 


Wells, Glastonbury, &c 


Hastings, St. Leonards, to. 


Weston-super-Mare 


Hereford and Wye Valley 


Weymouth and District 


Heme Bay, Whitstnble, to 


Whitby and District 


Hvthe, Littlestone, to. 


Worcester and District 


Iliracombe and N. Devon 


Worthing and S.W. Sussex 


Isle o! Man 


Wye Valley 


Isle ol Wight 


Yarmouth and the Broads 


Lake District The 




SCOTLAND. 


IRELAND. 


Aberdeen, Deeside, to. 


Antrim, Giant's Causeway, to. 


Edinburgh and District 


Bellast, Mourne Mountains, to. 


Glasgow and the Clyde 


Cork, Glengarifl, &c. 


Highlands, The 


Donegal Highlands 


Inverness and N. Highland! 


Dublin and Co. Wicklow. 


Oban and W. Highlands 


Eillarney and S.W. Ireland 




Londonderry and N. Ireland 


Tourist H 


andbooks. 


Continental. 


LritUk. 


Belgium 


Lake District, The 


Holland 


London (with additional naps and com- 


Norway 


plete Index to Streets) 


Paris and Environs 


North Wales (Northern and 9oo»t«r» 


Rome 


Sections combined) 


Switxerland 





RAILWAY MAP OF SCOTLAND 




ward lock a ro i 

' TD - Warwick House. Salisbury Square, LONDON 



INTRODUCTION. 

Scope of Book — An Attractive District — Angling, Golf, 
Cycling, etc. — Climate — Railway Routes — Sea Routes — 
Useful Hints— Hotels and Tariffs. 

THIS book is intended to guide the tourist over an area 
extending from the Dee to the Moray Coast, and 
east and west from the coast to the lower portion of the 
Spey. At Aberdeen the Caledonian Railway touches the 
area at its south-eastern corner, and the Highland Rail- 
way runs into the area for short distances on its western 
side. The book includes the whole of the district served by 
the Great North of Scotland Railway, which extends from 
Aberdeen to Elgin, sending out important branches right 
and left. Northward they go to the numerous interesting 
towns and villages on the coast from Cruden Bay to Lossie- 
mouth, and a branch runs up Strathspey to Boat of Garten, 
from which farther progress is possible by the Highland 
line. In the southern part of the district are the Deeside 
line from Aberdeen to Ballater (for Balmoral and Braemar) 
and a line up the valley of the Don as far as Alford. 

An Attractive District. 

The country traversed has great natural charm. This 
is particularly apparent in Deeside, Donside, Speyside, and 
along the coast, each of which districts has a distinctive 
picturesqueness. 

The country described is also rich in interesting associa- 
tions, often centred in a castle, church, noble mansion or 
other ancient building. 

To most of the notable spots the public have no difficulty 
in obtaining access, for, as a rule, the lords of the soil recognize 
that it is, as the poetic Henry Newman Howard expresses 
it, " the plain duty of a Christian gentleman not to withhold 
from the use of his fellow-creatures one acre of land save 
such as may be fenced for cultivation or required for his 
reasonable privacy." 

9 



10 INTRODUCTION 

• While the district presents much that is attractive to 
tourists in general, there are special attractions for special 
classes. The naturalist, the geologist, the botanist, and the 
archaeologist will each find much of interest. Mountaineers 
have a magnificent field for operations in Lochnagar, Ben 
Muich Dhui (or Macdhui), the Cairngorm range and other 
portions of the Aberdeenshire Highlands. 

Angling, Golf, Cycling, etc. 

For anglers there are some of the best trout streams in 
Scotland, and there are also waters in which a free cast may 
be made for salmon. Particulars respecting the principal 
spots where the " gentle art " may be exercised are given 
in connection with the most convenient headquarters. Those 
who desire more detailed information on the subject are 
recommended to procure J. Watson LyalPs Sportsman's and 
Tourist's Guide. 

Golfers will find abundant provision for their favourite 
pastime, no matter where they go. Aberdeen itself has no 
fewer than five courses, and but a short railway ride from 
the city is the famous course at Cruden Bay, which attracts 
devotees of the game from all parts of the kingdom. 

Cyclists must be prepared for hills, but will also find many 
delightful valley roads, requiring little capacity for " push- 
fulness." On some of the routes the increasing use of heavy, 
solid-tyred motor vehicles is injuriously affecting the surface 
of the roads not specially made to withstand such traffic. 
Members of the Cyclists' Touring Club will find it to their 
advantage to consult their own Scottish Road Book. 

Motorists will find the district well supplied with good 
roads, though one or two routes off the " beaten track " are 
distinctly rough and are best left alone by users of light cars 
who are making a lengthy tour. Such a road is that between 
Blairgowrie and Braemar, through Glen Shee and by way of 
the Devil's Elbow. At all the towns and many of the larger 
villages petrol and spares can be obtained. 

Those undertaking a road tour through Scotland should 
see that outlined on pp. 151-4. 

Climate. 
The summer climate of the Aberdeenshire and Banffshire 
Highlands is delightfully dry and bracing, and many are 
the testimonies to its salubrity and health-giving properties. 



CLIMATE— RAILWAY ROUTES 11 

To be reminded of the situation of Balmoral and of the benefit 
which Queen Victoria always derived from her annual sojourn 
there will probably satisfy most persons, but the following 
quotation from an appreciatory article may be welcome 
for the sake of its definite facts : — 

" The great attraction of the climate of the Scottish High- 
lands is its comparative coolness, and the coolness becomes, 
of course, all the greater the higher we ascend above the sea. 
As compared with London, the summer temperature of 
Braemar, for example, during the months of July, August, 
September, and October is respectively 8 - g, go, 91, and 74 
degs. lower. This is the climate which is best adapted for 
active exercise on the hills and moors. The admirably 
bracing and other hygienic qualities of the air of places which 
have comparatively dry climates, and which are 700 feet and 
upwards above the sea, are everywhere recognized ; and it 
is these qualities which give the upper districts of Deeside, 
Donside, and Speyside the finest summer climates anywhere 
to be found in the British Islands, particularly for those 
whose systems require to be braced up for the work of the 
coming winter. No other district, at these heights and 
temperatures, which contribute so important an ingredient 
to the climatic conditions required, can be named, having at 
the same time accommodation necessary for the comfort of 
summer visitors." 

Railway Routes. 

Tourists from England have the choice of three overland 
routes to the northern side of the border. They are the 
West Coast Route, of which the London and North-Western 
forms the English portion ; the East Coast Route, of which 
the Great Northern forms the southern part ; and the Midland 
Route. These routes are connected at Aberdeen with the 
lines of the Great North of Scotland Railway, which forms a 
link in the through route via Aberdeen and Elgin to Inverness, 
Strathpeffer, Skye and the Western Isles, and to all places 
in the North of Scotland. 

Information as to routes, trains, fares, etc., will be sent on 
application to the Superintendent of the Line of the respective 
companies : Euston Station, London (London and North- 
western) ; King's Cross Station, London (Great Northern) ; 
Derby or St. Pancras Station, London (Midland). 

Through carriages and first and third-class corridor carriages 
are run on the principal expresses. Sleeping saloon cars 
are attached to the night expresses, the charge for a berth 



12 SEA ROUTES 

being 155. in excess of the first-class fare. Pillows and rugs 
are supplied to passengers in the ordinary carriages at a 
charge of a shilling each. 

Restaurant cars are attached to some of the trains and on 
the others breakfast baskets, luncheon baskets, tea baskets 
or trays of tea can be obtained at the principal stations on 
notice being given to the guard or some other official at the 
previous stopping station. 

Sea Routes. 

Those who prefer a sea voyage to overland travelling can 
proceed by large and well-appointed steamers to Aberdeen 
and other ports on the north-eastern coast. 

The Aberdeen Steam Navigation Company's boats sail 
from London and Aberdeen about every five days from each 
port. The steamers are fitted in first-class style. On deck 
is a smoking-room and a ladies' saloon. Electric light is used 
throughout, and a stewardess is carried in both first and 
second cabins. The passage occupies about thirty-six hours. 
Full information can be obtained in London at the Company's 
wharf, Limehouse, at 25, Cannon Street, and 46 and 48, Beak 
Street, Regent Street, and in Aberdeen at 87, Waterloo 
Quay. 

Boats of the Aberdeen, Newcastle, and Hull Steamship 
Company carry passengers between Aberdeen and Newcastle, 
and Aberdeen and Hull. Particulars can be obtained at 79, 
Regent Quay, Aberdeen ; Bentham Buildings, Side, New- 
castle ; Prince's Dock Street, Hull. 

Vessels of the Dundee, Perth and London Shipping Co., Ltd., 
fitted with all modern conveniences, afford a comfortable 
means of travelling between the ports named. Full par- 
ticulars from 26, East Dock Street, Dundee, or 61, Mark 
Lane, London, E.C.3. 

The North of Scotland and Orkney and Shetland Steam 
Navigation Company's steamships call at Leith and Aberdeen. 
Address, The Manager, Aberdeen, or the Agent at Leith or 
Edinburgh. 

Useful Hints. 

Time Tables. — Tourists are advised to carry with them a 
copy of Murray's Scottish Time Tables. Both give par- 
ticulars respecting public motors, coaches and steamers, in 
addition to the train service on all the lines. Smaller 
time tables, giving much useful information, are pub- 



USEFUL HUNTS— HOTELS 13 

lished in Aberdeen and are on sale at all the railway book- 
stalls. 

Mountaineering. — Tourists who desire to ascend the moun- 
tains unaided by a guide should see that their outfit includes 
a stout stick, a waterproof or Scotch plaid, a well-filled 
sandwich box, some raisins, as they prevent thirst, a reliable 
map on a large scale, and a pocket compass. In using the last- 
named it must be remembered that the needle does not point 
to the true north. Roughly speaking, its direction at the 
present time in Great Britain is to a point some i8° west 
of north. The chief risk in climbing the Scotch mountains 
arises from the mists that suddenly blot out the landscape, 
and even hide the rocks at one's feet. In such a situation 
a trifling fall may be attended with results as serious as 
might follow a descent over a lofty precipice. The safest 
plan is to descend by the side of a stream, being always on 
guard against following the water in an abrupt descent. 

No pedestrian excursion of any extent off the beaten 
track should be undertaken without a good map and a 
compass. 

Clothing. — When considering the question of suitable 
clothing, the intending visitor should bear in mind the 
mountain trips and motor drives in which he will probably 
indulge. On such occasions he will find additional garments 
very acceptable, and his pleasure spoilt without them. 
Generally speaking, his ordinary clothing should be warmer 
than for the south of England. 

The Sabbath. — It should be remembered that there is 
very little travelling in Scotland on Sunday, that day being 
much more rigorously observed in North Britain than in the 
country south of the Tweed. 

Hotels and Tariffs. 

The hotel accommodation is admirable on the whole, but 
is taxed to the utmost during the season. To avoid dis- 
appointment it is advisable always to write, wire, or telephone, 
and to arrive as early as possible where the accommodation 
is limited. Some of the best hotels are temperance houses. 
As a rule, the charges at the first-class establishments are about 
the same as those at English watering-places. The tariffs 
stated in the following list were supplied by the hotel proprie- 
tors themselves, but as changes are frequent the terms should 
be regarded only as an approximate indication of the grade 

A berdeen 



14 



HOTELS AND TARIFFS 



of establishment, and should in all cases be verified by previous 
inquiry. 

Week-end terms include dinner or supper on Saturday and 
breakfast on Monday. 

[Abbreviations : R.. bedroom ; &., breakfast ; I., luncheon ; L, tea ; d., dinner ; a., 
attendance ; fr., from ; temp., temperance.] 



Aberdeen. 

Palace : R., single, fr. 6/- ; double, 

fr. 10/6 ; b., 3/6 ; I., 3/6 ; t., fr. 

1/6 ; d., 6/-; a., nil. 
Station : R., single, fr. 5/6 ; double, 

fr. 10/6 ; b., 3/6 ; l, 3/6 ; *., 1/3 ; 

d., 4/6 ; a., nil. 
Grand, Union Terrace : R., single, 

fr. 5/-; double, fr. 9/-; b., 3/6; 

I., 3/6 ; t., 1/6 ; d., (,/-. 

Boarding terms : fr. 94/6 per 
week. 
Imperial. 
Douglas. 
Royal, 3 Bath Street : R., single, 

3/6; double, 7/-; 6., fr. 2/6; I., 

fr. 3/6 ; t., 2/6 ; a.-, nil. 
Osborne {temp.), 451, Union Street : 

R., single, 4/-; double, 6/-; b., 

3/- ; *•> 3/9 ; *■• 2/-. 

Boarding terms : n/- per day ; 
70/— per week. 
Forsyth (temp.). 
Waverley. 
Chapman's (Restaurant), Union Street. 



Aboyne. 

Huntly Arms : R., single, bh ; double, 
10/-; 6., 3/-; I; 3/6; <-, 1/6; 
A. 5/6. 

Boarding terms : 18/- per day ; 
126/- per week. 



Aviemore. 

Station. 

Cairngorm. 

MacLaughlan's (temp.). 

Lynwilg, Loch Alvie : R., single, 4/- ; 

double, 8/- ; b., 3/- ; I., 3/- ; *., 

1/-; d., 5/-. 

Ballater. 

Invercauld Arms. 

Loirston. 

Farquharson's (temp.) : R., single, 

3/- ; double, 4/- ; b., 2/6 ; t., 2/6 ; 

d., 3/-. 

Boarding terms : 70/- per week. 
Golf. 

Banchory. 

Tor-na-Coille : R., single, 9/- ; 
double, 12/- ; I., 3/6 ; r., 2/- ; i., 
5/6. ' 

Boarding terms : 21/- per day; 
147/- per week. 
Banchory : R., single, 3/- ; double, 
6/- ; 6., 2/6 ; L, 3/- ; <., 2/6 ; d., 

3/- 

Boarding terms: 8/6 per day; 
52/6 per week ; 17/6 per week- 
end. 

Burnett Arms. 

Douglas Arms. 

Station (temp.). 



Alford. 

Forbes Arms : R., single, 3/6 ; double, 
6/-; b., 3/-; I-, 3/-; *-, 1/6; <*., 
5/-; a., nil. 

Boarding terms : 16/- per day ; 
105/- per week ; 25/- per week- 
end. 
Haughton Arms. 



Banff. 

Fife Arms. 

Crown (temp.), Old Market Place: 
R., single, 2/6 ; double, 4/6 ; b., 
2/6 ; I., 2/6 ; r., 2/6 ; <*., 3/-. 
Boarding terms : 10/6 per day ; 
' 70/- per week; 15/- per week- 
end. 
Legge's. 



Alyth. 

Commercial : 6., 2/6 ; I., 3/6 ; t, 
1/6 ; rf., 3/-. 

Boarding terms : 10/- per day ; 
70/- per week. 



Blair Atholl. 

Atholl Arms : R., single, fr. 5/- ; 

double, fr. 8/- ; b., 3/- ; I., lh i 

<*., 5/-- 
Tilt. 



HOTELS AND TARIFFS 



15 



[Abbbbviatioss : R.. bedroom ; b.. breakfast; 1., luncheon; (., tea; d., dinner; a.. 
attendance ; fr.. from ; temp., temperance.] 



Blairgowrie. 

Qneen's : R., single, 5/- ; double, 

9/-; 6., 3/6; I-, a/-; '•■ 1/9; <*-, 

5/-- 

Boarding terms : 13/6 per day; 
105/- per week. 
Royal : R., single, 4/6 ; double, 8/6 ; 
b., 2/6 ; I., 3/6 ; fc, 2/- ; d., 5/-. 
Boarding terms : 15/- per day; 
100/- per week ; 35/- per week- 
end. 
Victoria. 
Station. 
Railway. 
Temperance. 

Boat of Garten. 

Boat of Garten : R., single, fr. 4/6 ; 
double, fr. 8/-; b., 3/-; /., 3/-; 
fc, 1/6; d., 5/6; a., 1/6. 

Boarding terms : fr. 14/- per day. 

Braemar. 

Invercauld Arms. 
Fife Arms. 



Buckie. 



Commercial. 



Craigellachie. 

Craigellachie : R., single, fr. 4/- ; 
double, fr. 8/- ; b., fr. 3/- ; I., fr. 
3/- ; t., fr. 1/6 ; <fc, fr. 5/-. 

Boarding terms : fr. 16/6 per 
day ; fr. 105/- per week. 

Cruden Bay. 

Cruden Bay: R., single, fr. 7/-; 
double, fr. 10/6 ; b., 3/6 ; fc, 3/6 ; 
t., 1/6 ; d., 6/-. 

Boarding terms : fr. 147/- per 
week. 
Kilmarnock Arms (private). 

Cullen. 

Grant Arms. 
Seafield Arms. 
Royal Oak. 

Culter. 

Duff Arms [temp.). 

Dufftown. 

Commercial. 
Fife Arms. 



Edzell. 

Glenesk. 

Panmure Arms: R., single, 3/6; 
double, 8/- ; b., 3/- ; /., 3/- ; t., 

2/-; rf.,5/6. 

Boarding terms : 15/- per day ; 
fr. 84/- per week. 

Elgin. 

City. 

Gordon Arms. 

Station : R., single, 5/- ; double, 
10/-; b., 3/-; I., 3/-; r., 1/6; 
d.,4/6. 

Boarding terms : fr. 94/6 per 
week. 
Tower. 



Elion. 



New Inn. 

Station. 

Buchan. 



Fochabers. 

Gordon Arms : R., single, fr. 5/- ; 
double, fr. 10/-; 6., fr. 3/-; I., fr. 
3/-; fc.fr. a/-; rf., fr. 5/-. 

Boarding terms : fr. no/- per 
week. 
Grant Arms. 
Gordon-Richmond, Spey Bay. 

Fraserburgh. 

Royal : R-, single, 3/6 ; double, 7/- ; 
b., 2/6 ; I., 3/-; fc, 2/6 ; d., 5/-. 
Boarding terms : n/6 per day. 
Saltoun. 
Station. 

Grantown-on-Spey. 

Grant Arms: R., single, 5/6 ; double, 
9/6; 6., 3/-; I., 3/-; fc, 1/6; d., 
4/6. 

Boarding terms : 16/- per day; 
105/- per week. 
Palace : if., single, 4/-; double, 6/6; 
b., 3/-; '-, 3/-; <-, 1/6; d.,4/6; 
a., nil. 

Boarding terms : fr. 12/- per day ; 
fr. 84/- per week ; 25/- per 
week-end. 
Sfrathspey. 

Grant's (private): R., single, 4/-; 
double, 7/- ; b., 2/9 ; /., 3/6 ; fc, 
1/6 ; d., 2/9 ; a., nil. 

Boarding terms : 10/6 per day ; 
70/- per week ; 15/- per week- 
end. 



16 



HOTELS AND TARIFFS 



[Abbreviations : R., bedroom; b., breakfast; l. t luncheon; U t tea; d.. dinner;* a., 

attendance ; jr., from ; temp., temperance,] 



Huntly. 

Gordon Arms. 
Gordon (temp.). 
Strathbogie. 

Insch. 

Station. 

Kemnay. 
Burnett Arms. 

Lossiemouth. 

Stotfleld : R., single, 2/6 ; double, 
4/- ; b., 2/6 ; /., 3/6 ; t., 1/6 ; 
d., 5/- ; a., 1/6. 

Boarding terms : 15/- per day ; 
105/- per week. 
Marine : R., single, 4/- ; double, 8/- ; 
b-, 3/6 ; /., 3/6 ; /., 1/6 ; d., 6/- ; 
a., 1/6. 

Boarding terms : fr. 84/- per 
week. 



Lumphanan. 



Lumphanan. 



Macduff. 



Fife Arms : R., single, 4/-; b., 3/-; 

J.,3/-; i.,\H 

Boarding terms : 14/- per day ; 
84/- per week ; 21/- per week- 
end. 

Plough. 

Fraser's (temp.). 

Bay View (temp.). 

Nethybridge. 

Nethy Bridge : R., single, 4/6 ; double, 
8/-; b.,3/-; J..3/-J t.,1/6; d., 

5/6. 

Boarding terms : fr. 84/- per 
week. 



Old Meldrum. 

Commercial : R., single, 2/- ; double. 
3/6 ; b., 2/6 ; I., 2/6 ; t., 2/6 ; d., 
2/6 ; a., 1/-. 

Boarding terms : 10/6 per day ; 
70/- per week ; 20/- per week- 
end. 

Peterhead. 

Palace. 

Royal : R., single, 3/- ; double, 5/-; 
b., 2/6 ; l, 3/- ; t., 2/6 ; d., 3/6. 
Boarding terms : 10/6 per day ; 
70/- per week ; 19/- per week- 
end. 
North-Eastern 
Waverley. 

Portsoy. 

Commercial : R., single, 3/6 ; double, 
6/- ; b., 2/3 ; I., 2/6 ; t., 2/3 ; d., 

3/- ; «-, fr - */-■ » » 

Boarding terms : 10/- per day ; 
60/- per week ; 30/- per week- 
end. 
Station. 

Stonehaven. 

Royal : R., single, 4/- ; double, 8/-; 

b., 3/- ; *•, 3/- ; t-, 1/6 ; <*., 4/6. 

Boarding terms : 90/- per week. 
Commercial : R., single, 3/- ; double, 
5/6 ; b., 2/6 ; /., 3/- ; «., 2/- ; d., 
3/6. 

Boarding terms : 12/- per day ; 
75/- per week. 
Marine. 

Tomintoul. 

Richmond Arms. 
Gordon Arms. 

Turriff. 

Fife Arms. 





Hotel, 
Boarding House, 

Motor Tour, 
Holiday Cruise, 



an< 



Business Directory. 





Scotch Series, 1926-27 



Aberdeen, Cruden Bay, &c. 



Where to stay in Scotland 

HOTELS 

OWNED AND MANAGED BY THE 

LONDON AND NORTH EASTERN RAILWAY. 

EDINBURGH 

NORTH BRITISH STATION HOTEL. 
Patronized by Royalty. Over 400 Rooms. 

Directly connected by Covered Entrance with 

Waverley Station. 
Handsomely Appointed. 
Finest Cuisine, Wines, and Service. 
Tels., "British, Edinburgh." 'Phone 8966 Central (7 lines). 

GLASGOW 

NORTH BRITISH STATION HOTEL. 

Finest Site in the City. Southern Exposure. 
Adjoins Queen Street Station. 
Tels., "Attractive, Glasgow." 'Phone 1109 Douglas. 

ABERDEEN 

PALACE HOTEL. 

Covered Way from Station Platforms. 
Comfortable. Convenient. 

Excellent Centre for Motoring . 
Tels., "Palatial, Aberdeen." 'Phone 2920 (4 Lines). 

STATION HOTEL. 

Entrance Opposite to Station. 
Comfortable. Convenient. Well Equipped. 
Tels., " Station Hotel, Aberdeen. " 'Phone 2962. 

CRUDEN BAY 

CRUDEN BAY HOTEL & GOLF COURSES. 

Splendidly Equipped. Faces South. 

Adjoins First Tees. Magnificent Views. 
Tels.. " Health, Cruden Bay." 'Phones, 3 Cruden Bay, 1252 Central. Aberdeen- 

For Apartments and Full Particulars, apply 
Resident Managers. 



Aberdeen 3 

ABERDEEN. 

OSBORNE PRIVATE HOTEL 

451, UNION STREET. 

NEAREST Hotel to all Motor Garages. Centrally 
Situated. Close to Station. Terms Moderate. 
Under Personal Supervision of 

Miss STEWART, Proprietress 

'Phone 1208. (Late Ballater). 

GOLD AND SILVER 

Scotch Jewellery 

And Souvenirs in Cairngorm, Granite, and Pebble. 

Fine Selection of Mounted and Unmounted 
Scotch Pearls and Cairngorms. 

HIGHLAND ORNAMENTS 

Of our own Manufacture. 
SPECIAL DESIGNS SUBMITTED. 

Large Selection of 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS & PEARL NECKLETS 
Geo. JAMIESON & SON 

(W. W. CARRY), 

Waltham Watch Depot, 

142, UNION STREET, 

Next Union Bridge, Aberdeen. 
Established 1733. 

ABERDEEN. 



DOUGLAS HOTEL 

-p) EFURNISHED and Redecorated Throughout. First- 
*■ ^ class Family and Commercial Hotel. Hot and 

Cold Water in every Bedroom. Electric Lift to every 

Floor. Terms Moderate. 

L. MACK AY, Manager. 



Aberdeen 



ABERDEEN. 



Aberdeen Photographic Service 



ALL KODAK 
SUPPLIES. 




BEST QUALITY. 
QUICKEST SERVICE. 
LOWEST PRICES. 

Mail Orders. Prompt Attention. 

Cameras & All Accessories. Develop- 
ing and Printing. Enlarging. Copying. 

Lantern Slides. 
CAMERAS BOUGHT, SOLD 
HIRED, REPAIRED or TAKEN in 

EXCHANGE. 
Every Class of Photographic Work 
Undertaken Indoors or Outdoors. 

EVERYTHING THE 
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDS. 
Send for Price Lists. 
DEEN PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE, 

22, 24. 26. MARISCHAL STREET, 

ABERDEEN. 

The CENTRAL GARAGE 

Distributor for Buick & Chevrolet Cars. 




REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

JOHN JACKSON, 

Automobile and Electrical Engineer, 
10-12, BON-ACCORD STREET. 

'Phone Central 8S1, , JTels,,?" Garage. Aberdeen." 



Aberdeen 



ABERDEEN CORPORATION TRAMWAYS 

POPULAR 

CHAR-A-BANC TOURS 

For the Convenience of Visitors, the Corporation 
have arranged the following Tours, showing 
the best and most interesting parts of the 
City and Surrounding Country. 

Leave CASTLE STREET :— 
Daily from 10 a.m. Sundays from 2 p.m. 

SPECIAL TOWN & COUNTRY TOUR 3/- 

Thirty Miles Drive round Aberdeen and 
Surrounding Districts, including Deeside. 

GRAND CIRCULAR TOUR - - - 2/- 

Twenty Miles Drive round Aberdeen, 
embracing a Complete Circuit of the City. 

DEESIDE TOUR 1/6 

Sixteen Miles Drive along Deeside. 

WESTERN TOUR - - - - 1/- 

Western Aberdeen, Rubislaw Quarries, 
Bridge of Dee, &c. 

SOUTHERN TOUR - - - - 1/- 

Southern Aberdeen, Bay of Xigg, Fish 
Market, &c. 

NORTHERN TOUR - - - - 1/- 

Xorthern Aberdeen, Cairncry, Marischal 
College, &c. 

DEE, DON & SEA BEACH TOUR - 1/- 

A Delightful Run from the Bridge of 
Don along the Sea Beach Esplanade to 
the North Pier. 

JUVENILES - - HALF-PRICE. 

Be Sure You Travel by Corporation Motors. 

Seats Booked, Tour Guides and all Information supplied on -Application 
to THE CORPORATION TRAMWAYS OFFICE, 2, MARISCHAL SP 



6 Arrochar — Blair Atholl — Bridge of Allan — Braemar 



ARROCHAR, LOCH LONG. 




GARAGE. 

'Phone Tarbet 5. 



ROSS'S HOTEL 

(LICENSED). 

FIRST-CLASS Family and Tourist 
Hotel. Visitors will find Every 
Comfort, combined with Moderate 
Charges. Convenient Centre for 
making One-day Excursions to Glen 
Croe, Loch Lomond, " The Trossachs," 
Fort William, Loch Awe, Oban, Kyles 
of Bute, &c.,&c, and for the Ascent of 
the Arrochar Alps. Officially appoin- 
ted by R.S.A.C, A.C.U., C.T.C. 

MOTOR CARS FOR HIRE. 

Telegrams, "Ross, Arrochar." 



BLAIR ATHOLL. 



ATHOLL ARMS HOTEL 

FIRST-CLASS FAMILY. 



Electric Light. Golf. Fine Scenery. 

'Phone No. 4. PETROL AND OIL STOCKED. 



BRIDGE OF ALLAN. 



CARMICHAEL'S HOTEL 



Situated on the 

GREAT NORTH ROAD TO THE HIGHLANDS 

/ ISITORS will find the above Hotel most Comfortable, 
combined with Moderate Charges. Garage adjoining 
for Residents and Non-Residents. Cars for Hire. 

'Phone 93. Mrs. J. CARMICHAEL, Proprietress. 



V 



BRAEMAR. 

INVERGAULD ARMS HOTEL 

THE Finest Hotel Situation in Scotland, which Stands over 1,100 feet 
above Sea Level. It is a First-class Residential Hotel, patronised by 
the Royal Family and the Court. It has been Planned and Equipped on 
the most Approved Style to ensure Comfort and Satisfaction to Residents. 
House contains a number of Private Sitting Rooms, Lavatory and Bath 
Room Accommodation en Suite, Magnificent Dining Hall and Comfortable 
Lounge. Lighted Throughout by Electricity. Modern Sanitary Arrange- 
ments. i8-hole Golf Course. Tennis. Motor Garage. Motors for Hire. 
Motor Coach Leaves Hotel Daily for Perth. 

'Phone No. 3. J. GREGOR, Proprietor. 



Braemar — Callander 



BRAEMAR, N.B. 

Fife Arms Hotel Garage. 

A 20-SEATER MOTOR COACH 

SERVICE. 

A MOTOR COACH SERVICE will be in operation between 

f»e:rtw and braemar 

Commencing 1st July and concluding 30th September, and running Daily 

except Sundays. 

'Phone Braemar 5. H. VV. BONNER, Proprietor. 

TIME T-A^B JOE. 

Leave Braemar, Fife Arms Hotel and Invercauld Arms Hotel 8.30 a.m 

Spittal of Glenshee Hotel 9.40 ,, 

Bridge of Cally ... 10.40 „ 

Blairgowrie, Queen's Hotel and Royal Hotel 11.5 ,, 

Arrive Perth Station Hotel 11.50 ,, 

Leave Perth Station Hotel 2.0 p.m. 

,, Blairgowrie, Queen's Hotel and Royal Hotel 3.0 ,, 

Bridge of Cally 3.30 ,, 

„ Spittal of Glenshee Hotel 4.30 ,, 

Arrive Braemar, Fife Arms Hotel and Invercauld Arms Hotel 5.40 ,, 

LUGGAGE TAKEN. 

Also at Central Garage, BALLATER, and The Garage, ABOYNE. 

Three Well- appointed Marlborough Landaulettes and Touring Car for Hire. 

Garage Accommodation for Cars. Petrol, Oils, Tyres, &c. 

CALLANDER. 

CALEDONIAN HOTEL 

"THIS FIRST-CLASS FAMILY and TOURIST HOTEL has been Re- 
* decorated and Refurnished Throughout, and fitted up to make it one 
of the Best and most Comfortable Hotels in the Loch Katrine district. 
The Hotel is within one minute's walk of Railway Station, and Coaches to 
and from the Trossachs pass it daily. Excellent Cuisine. Salmon and 
Trout Fishing. Golf. Tennis. Bowling. Motoring. Terms Moderate. 
Hotel Porter meets all Trains. 

'Phone No. 43. Apply Proprietor, W. MACKAY. 

In connection with CRESCENT HOTEL, 12, Royal Crescent, GLASGOW, C.3. 

Telephone Douglas 1151. Garage. 

CALLANDER (Perthshire;. 

ANCASTER ARMS HOTEL 

A FIRST-CLASS FAMILY AND TOURIST HOTEL. 

Headquarters Scottish Automobile Club. 

EXCELLENT Garage with Pit. Repairs. Petrol, 
Oils and Greases Stocked. Golf and Fishing Free 
to Visitors. Replete with every Modern Convenience. 
Excellent Cuisine and Charges Strictly Moderate. 

Mrs. MITCHELL, Proprietress. 



Crieff — Dunoon 



CRIEFF. 



BOARDING 
ESTAB., 



AVELAND HOUSE 

COMRIE ROAD. 

MRS. McGILLIVRAY has removed from 
" Broomfield," Heathcote Road, to the above address 
where she has acquired more commodious premises. 
These include large Drawing Room and Smoking Room. 
The situation is high, with easy access to McRosty Park 
and Knock. Good Cuisine. Comfortable Bedrooms. 
Terms Moderate. 'Phone 90. 

CRIEFF. 

"WHINMOUINT" 

DRUMMOND TERRACE. 

BOARD-RESIDENCE. Splendid Situation. Every 
Comfort and Convenience. Central for Golf, 

Tennis and Bowling. Garden and Lawn. 

Terms on Application. Misses WALKER. 

DUNOON. 

M'COLL'S HOTEL 

Official Hotel A.A. 

WEST BAY. 

M'COLL'S HOTEL occupies the Finest Position in Dunoon. It stands 
in its Own Grounds, with i8-hole Putting Green extending to the 
Promenade. Overlooks the Tennis Courts, and is within easy reach of the 
18-hole Golf Course. Three minutes from Pier, and most central for Sailing. 
Fully Licensed. Excellent Cuisine. WM. WALLACE, Proprietor. 

Tels., "Luxury." 'Phone 58. 

DUNOON. 



BAY -VIEW PRIVATE HOTEL 

BEAUTIFULLY Situated, facing New West Bay Pro- 
menade. Excellent Cuisine. En Pension. Boatingi 
Bathing, Golf, Tennis and Fishing. 

For Terms apply Mrs. ANDREWS, Proprietrix. 

'Phone 98. 



Dunoon 9 

DUNOON . 

WINDSOR BOARDING HOUSE 

WEST BAY. 

HOUSE is Beautifully and Conveniently Situated in 
Finest Position on the Promenade, within five 
minutes' walk from the Town and Pier and overlooking 
the Picturesque "West Bay" and commanding a Mag- 
nificent View of the Famous Firth of Clyde. Excellent 
Cuisine. 'Phone 29. M. RUSSELL, Proprietress. 

DUNOON. 



ANNET BHAN 

West Bay Promenade. 

OFTUATED Facing Sea, with Extensive and Splendid 
^ Sea Views. Convenient for Town, Pier, Bathing 
and Boating. Excellent Cuisine. Separate Tables. 
Tariff on Application. J. S. F. WATT, Proprietor. 

DUNOON. 

PITCAIRLIE ftsL. 

EAST BAY PROMENADE. 

EVERY Comfort. Terms Moderate. Boating 
and Bathing adjacent. Extensive Sea Views. 

Mrs. ADAIR. 
DUNOON. 

WAV EC REST 

BOARD-RESIDENCE, 

Alexandra I^ax-sacaLe. 

SITUATED OX EAST BAY ESPLANADE. 
Extensive Sea View. Terms Moderate. 

Proprietress, Miss M. McXAE. 



io Edinburgh 

EDINBURGH. 

13& 25, ROYAL CIRCUS 

PRIVATE AND RESIDENTIAL HOTEL. 

Good Cuisine. Quiet. 
Central. Ideal Position. 
Separate Tables. 

Electric Light. 

'Phone 2049 CENTRAL. 

Miss M'LENNAN, Proprietress. 

EDINBURGH. 



George Hotel 

(Within two minutes' walk of Princes Street) 

THE MOST CENTRAL IN THE CITY. 

This Old-established Hotel is well-known for its Comfort & Excellence of Cuisine- 

ELECTRIC LIGHT THROUGHOUT. TARIFF MODERATE. 

GARAGE. BILLIARDS. A.A. APPOINTED. 

Telephone 8800 Central (3 lines). Telegraphic Address, " Nearest." 

Also Blythswood Hotel, Glasgow. G. E ADAMS, Proprietor. 



EDINBURGH. 



Suttie's Hotel ° ed ™ d . 

20, SOUTH BRIDGE. Cr eaKtaSt 



6|6 



MOST CENTRAL. NEAR STATION, G.P.O., &c. 
GARAGE CONVENIENT. 

JOHN FORBES, 
'Phone 8057 Central. Proprietor. 



Edinburgn i i 

EDINBURGH. 

"BLAIR ATHOLL 

PRIVATE HOTEL, 
GROSVENOR STREET (West End). 
Conveniently Situated for Stations and Trams. 
'Phone 8017. 

EDINBURGH. 

GREEN'S HOTELS 

24-25, Eglinton Crescent, Phone 1174. 
29, Walker Street. 5145. 

Telegrams, " Verte, Edinburgh. 

FIRST-CLASS Tourist and Residential Hotels. Central. 
Unsurpassed for Cuisine and Comfort. 

Also at 22, 23, 24, Woodlands Terrace, Glasgow. 
EDINBURGH. 

CRESCENT RESIDENTIAL HOTEL 

6, Coates Crescent (West End). 

COMFORTABLE Boarding Establishment. Two 
minutes from Railway Stations. Most con- 
venient for all Trams and Tours connections. 
Terms Moderate. 
'Phone Cent. 3080. Apply I. & J. M. FORBES. 

EDINBURGH. 

SHELBOURNE 

Private Hotel, 
HART STREET. 

Highly Recommended. 
Four minutes from Waverley Station and G.P.O. 
'Phone 7690 Central. Miss HARPER, Proprietress. 
TeJs., " Shelbourne, Edinburgh." 



1 2 Edinburgh 

S.M.T. Motor Tours 
Through Bonnie 
Scotland - 

S.M.T. Motor Coaches, fitted with 
pneumatic tyres are beautifully swift 
and smooth running. You can visit the 
beauty spots of Scotland as comfortably 
as though seated in your favourite arm- 
chair. Every Tour is carefully planned 
and starts from within easy reach of the 
leading Hotels. 

Write to S.M.T.Co. 

for 
Further Particulars 

On the opposite page are particulars of 
a few of these splendid Tours. Please 
write direct to the Scottish Motor Traction 
Co. for further information and plan 
your itinerary accordingly. Romance, 
History and Magnificent Scenery are 
waiting for you now. < See it all in 
luxury by S.M.T. Touring Coach. 

The SCOTTISH MOTOR TRACTION Co., Ltd. 
East Fountainbridge - EDINBURGH. 



Edinburgh 13 



Daily Tours through- 
out the Season 

Loch Lomond Tour. — Stirling, Aberfoyle, Drymen, Bal- 
loch, Sail on Loch Lomond to Luss (extra). 

Dumfries Tour. — Tweedsmuir, Devil's Beef Tub, Moffat. 
Dumfries, returning via Ellisland, Thornhill, Dalveen 
Pass, Biggar, Carlops. 

Coldstream Tour. — Norham, Berwick-on-Tweed, Tan- 
tall on. 

Sir Walter Scott Tour. 

Trossachs Tour. — Trossachs, Steamer on Loch Katrine 
(extra), Stirling. 

Loch Earn Tour. — Rumbling Bridge, St. Fillans, Rob 
Roy's Grave, Loch Lubnaig. 

St. Mary's Loch Tour. — St. Mary's Loch, Yarrow, 
Selkirk, Gala Water. 

Melrose Tour. — Borthvvick, Abbotsford, Melrose, Dry- 
burgh, Bemersyde. 

Edinburgh and District.— Sight Seeing Tour. 

Motor Coaches also run every 

15 minutes to the Forth Bridge 

and to Roslin. 

When in Edinburgh book at : — 

The Scottish Motor Traction Co., Ltd., 29, East Fountainbridge, 

Edinburgh ('Phone 9320 — 5 lines). 

M'Kinlay Brothers, 10, So. St. Andrew Street ('Phone 3481). 

The American Express Co., Inc., 45, Princes Street ('Phone 7878). 

J. & H. Lindsay, 18, So. St. Andrew Street ('Phone 1035). 

Methven Simpson, 83A, Princes Street ('Phone 2027). 

The SCOTTISH MOTOR TRACTION Co., Ltd. 
East Fountainbridge - EDINBURGH. 



1 4 Edinburgh 

EDINBURGH. 

10, ROYAL CIRCUS 

AND 

2, SAXE-COBURG PLACE. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

Convenient by Car from Waverley Station. Near Garage. 

Close to Botanic Gardens. 

PAYING GUEST VACANCIES. Comfortable. Moderate. Well Recommended . 

Phones 101 & 7675. Miss A. RHIND. 

EDINBURGH. 

59, MANOR PLACE 

West-End Boarding Establishment. 
Five Minutes from Princes Street. 

•Phone No. 7592. Tels., 7592. Mrs. WILSON 

(Late 29, Palmerstox Place i. 

JOPPA, EDINBURGH. 

QUEEN'S BAY HOTEL 

3i miles from Princes Street, by Train, Car or Motor Bus. 
THIRST-CLASS LICENSED HOTEL, with Beautiful 
•*■ Grounds, Rock and Rose Gardens. Every Con- 
venience and Comfort. Garage. Terms Moderate. 
'Phone 24 Portobello. For full particulars apply 

MANAGERESS. 

A NEW BOOK FOR frlOTORISTS. 

THE 

OWNER-DRIVER'S HANDBOOK 

How to drive and look after your -car. 

By EDWARD T. BROWN. 

Motoring Correspondent to the '* Westminster Gazette," and many 01 

the leading Provincial and Colonial Papers. 

Cloth. Over 100 Illustrations. From all Booksellers. 

3 & IWe-fc. 

WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON, E.C.4. 



Fort Augustus — Fort William 



15 



FORT AUGUSTUS. 



LOVAT ARMS & STATION HOTEL 



1 






• 




/ /-: 








ggm 















ON me Direct Route to the North, amid Finest Highland scenery. 
First-class. Excellent Cuisine. Electric Light. Garage. Cars for 
Hire. Motor Mechanic on Premises. Salmon and Trout Fishing. Golf and 
Boating. 'Phone Fort Augustus 6. Tels., "Station Hotel." 

M. ROBERTSON, Proprietrix. 
Officially Appointed R.A.C., R.S.A.C., M.TJ. and A.A. 

FORT AUGUSTUS. 

DOUGLAS HOTEL 

JhTRST-CLASS Family and Tourist Hotel. Every Atten- 
tion. Comfort and Moderate Charges. Situated at 
Head of Loch Ness. Salmon and Trout Angling on Loch 
Ness. Near to Golf Course and close to Station, Post 
Office and Boats. Electric Light. Garage. Boots meets 
all Trains and Steamers. Apply Manageress, 

Mrs. ALEXANDER. 
Tels., "Douglas, Fort Augustus. 



FORT WILLIAM 




Family and Commercial 

Close to Station. Facing Sea. 

Centrally situated for 
Tours. Comfortable 
and Moderate 



•Phone 40. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT. 

BOOTS MEETS 
TRAINS, BUSES & STEAMERS. 

Under Personal Supervision of Proprietor, A. WEIR. 



1 6 Fort William 



FORT WILLIAM. 

MACINTYRE & SON'S 

Grandest Motor Tours 

IN SCOTLAND. 

MAKE Fort William your Touring Centre. The 
Historic Town is an Ideal Centre from which 
to tour the most Interesting Parts of Scotland. 
Circular Tours, by our perfectly appointed Blue Motor 
Coaches, start from the Booking Offices, 56, 58, 60, High 
Street, Monzie Square. The Expense to Tourist is 
considerably less than any other method of seeing the 
Country in comfort. 

A few Circular and other Tours you will enjoy: — 

1. Invergarry, Tomdoun, Loch Claunie, Loch Duich, 

Dornie, Invermorston and Fort Augustus. 

2. Loch Laggan, Newtonmore, Kingussie, viewing the 

Grampian Mountain Ranges, Inverness and Fort 
Augustus. 

3. Famous Pass of Glencoe and Kingshouse, via 

Kinlochleven. 

4. Inverness, via Caledonian Canal (4-hour journey), 

visiting Culloden Battle Field. 

5. Circular Tour ACHNACARRY and DARK MILE. 

6. Glen Nevis, viewing Path of Ben Nevis, also Two 

Beautiful Waterfalls. 

7. One Day Circular Tour, Loch Laggan, Killiecrankie, 

Pitlochry and Glencoe. 

8. Char-a-banc and Motor Boat, Glenelg and over the 

Sea to Skye. 

9. Acharacle, via Ardgour, Strontian, Salen, Acharacle. 
Write now for Full Particulars and Handbills. 

RAMBLES ARRANGED FOR ANY EVENING. 

First-class Private Cars and Chars-a-bancs for Parties can 

be bad at any time for any Distance. 

Special Quotation for Parties of 14 and upwards. 

MOTOR ENGINEERS and HAULAGE CONTRACTORS. 

All Repairs Promptly Executed. 

Tyres, Oils and Greases. Pratt's Golden Pump. 

Large Stock of Motor Accessories of Every Description. 

SEE YOU TRAVEL BY THE BLUE CARS. 

MACINTYRE & SON'S, FORT WILLIAM. 

Tels., "MACINTYRE'8 GARAGE, FORT WILLIAM." 'Phone 21 



Fort William 



FORT WILLIAM. 




BEN NEVIS GARAGE 



(E. J. CAMERON, Proprietor). 



MOTOR ENGINEERS, 
24, HIGH ST., FORT WILLIAM 

Motor Cars for Hire. 

ALL REPAIRS PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

Tyres, Oils and Greases. All Accessories Stocked. 

An Alphabetically arranged List of 

Hotels, 
Boarding Establishments, 
Schools, 



House and 



Estate Agents. 



At the Principal Holiday and Health Resorts 
will be found at the end of this Guide- 

bcvtch Series, 1926-27] 2 



Glasgow 



A News^eeJ la the QrtefhaL 




ONE DAY 
CIRCULAR TOURS 

Pass of Killieerankie. 
Taymouth & Kenmore. 
Gleneoe & Ballachulish 
Oban & Land o' Lome. 
Melrose Abbey and 

Scott Country. 
Loch Lomond and 

Trossachs. 
Loch Lomond and 

West Highlands. 
Loch Earn. 
Trossachs. 
The Three Lochs. 
Amulree & Loch Tay. 
Burns' Country. 



Descriptive Booklet, complete 
with Maps, sen: free on request 



BANKIN Bros. 

58, DUNDAS STBEET 

(Near Queen Street Station), 

GLASGOW, CI. 



-DOUGLAS 3161-2. 



THE BEST WAY 

to see the 

Scottish Highlands 

is by 

MOTOR COACH 



SPECIAL 
HIGHLAND TOURS 

Two- Day Aberdeen 

Tour. 
Three- Day Inverness 

Tour. 
Five- Day Highland 

Tour. 
Eight- Day John o' 

Groats Tour. 
Two- Day Oban and 

West Highlands. 
Three- Day Oban and 

Campbeltown. 



Panoraura 




Glasgow — Innellan — Inverness 19 

GLASGOW. 

Blythswood Hotel 

FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL 

(Two minutes from Central Station). 

DOUBLE WINDOWS TO EXCLUDE NOISE. EXCELLENT CUISINE. 

FULLY LICENSED. ELECTRIC LIGHT. BILLIARDS. 

HOT AND COLD WATER THROUGHOUT. 

G. EGLINTON ADAMS, Proprietor. 

GLASGOW. 

GREENS HOTEL 

22, 23, 24, Woodlands Terrace. 



F 



IRST-CLASS Residential and Tourist Hotel. Central. 
Unsurpassed for Cuisine and Comfort. 

Tels., " Verte, Glasgow." 'Phone Charing 972. 

Also in Edinburgh. 



INNELLAN (Firth of Clyde) . 

OSBORNE HOUSE 

A HANDSOMELY Appointed Private Hotel. Situated 
on the Shore, near Pier, between Dunoon and 
Rothesay. Excellent Cuisine, under the Personal 
Supervision of the Proprietrix. 

Tels., " Osborne, Innellan." 'Phone Innellan 14. 

Mrs. A. E. OSBORNE, Resident Proprietrix. 
INVERNESS . 

THE PALACE HOTEL 

ENTIRELY Refurnished and Redecorated. Beauti- 
- fully Situated on River Ness. First-class Family 
Hotel. Electric Light. Large Garage adjoining Hotel. 
Salmon and Trout Fishing Free to Visitors. Special 
Boarding Terms. 

Apply MANAGERESS. 



Inverness 



CALEDONIAN HOTEL 




THE above Well-known FIRST-CLASS HOTEL is the Largest and Best 
Appointed Hotel in Inverness and Universally Acknowledged One of 
the Most Comfortable in Scotland. All the Public Rooms, including the 
Lounge, are of a Modern Style, Lit Throughout with Electric Light. The 
Bedroom Views are Unsurpassed, Showing Miles of Mountain Scenery, and 
Overlooking the River Ness. Headquarters R.S.A.C. and all Principal 
Automobile Clubs, including America. Hotel Porters meet all Trains. 
Salmon and Sea Trout Fishing on River Ness in connection with Hotel. 
Moderate Charges. Motor Hiring, Garage and' Repair Shop. 
Telephone No. 246. FRANK STEVEN, Proprietor. 



INVERNESS. 

The BUGHT HOUSE 

High-class Private Hotel. 

A CHARMING Old-fashioned Residence with Modern 
Comforts. Has a Country Aspect but only a few 
minutes' walk from Inverness. Central Heating. 
Fine Rooms. Fishing. Boating. Tennis. Croquet. 
Beautiful Secluded Grounds and Large Garden. Own 
Produce. Lovely Private 'Walks. First-class Cooking. 
Personal Management. Lunch, Dinner and Afternoon 
Tea Served Daily to Non-Residents. 

Special Reduced Terms for Permanent Visitors. 
Car for Hire. Phone 514. 



Inverness 



INVERNESS. 

Convenient for Station and Pier. 

Comfortable and 

Moderate. 



V^> 



&& 






***• 



\S 






5 ^^^-^PERSONAL 
"C^U-^ATTENTION. 

'Phone 27. Electric Light. 
C.U., C.T.C. Terms on Application. 

J. C. NEISH, Proprietor. 



INVERNESS 




WAVERLEY 
HOTEL. 

Unsurpassed for 

Situation & Comfort. 

Fishing. 

One minute from 

Railway Station. 

Tels., " Waverlev." 

'Phone 279. 

D. DAVIDSON", 

Proprietor. 



INVERNESS. 

MAGGILVRAYS HOTEL 

(High-class Temperance . 

CLOSE to Station and General Post Office. Every Com. 
fort for Families, Tourists and Commercial Gentlemen. 
Tariff on application. Terms Moderate. 'Phone 491. 

Boots meets Steamers and Trains. 

J. WINTON, Proprietor. 

INVERNESS. 



GLENMORISTON HOUSE 



NESS BANK. 



STANDING within its Own Grounds on the Banks of the River Ness. 
Commodious Rooms. Redecorated. All Modern Convenience. 
Unsurpassed tor Situation, Comfort, and Excellent Catering. Garage. 
Tennis. Charges Moderate. Tariff on Application. 

'Phone 482. A.W.MACKENZIE. 



Inverness 



INVERNESS . 

HANOVER HOUSE 

9, NESS BANK, 

BOARD-RESIDENCE. 

CITUATED on Banks of River Xess. Close to Town, 
J Station, and Tennis. Splendid surrounding Scenery 
within few minutes of House. Terms Moderate. 

Mrs. FRASER, Proprietress. 




BEST GOODS. BEST SERVICE. 

OGSTONS 

CHEMISTS, ETC., 

18, UNION STREET, 
INVERNESS. 

Pure Drugs and Chemicals. 

Cameras, Optical Lanterns, Cinemas. 

Developing, Printing, Enlarging and Repairs.? 



INVERNESS. 

cLass" Luncheon and 
Tea Rooms. 



Moderate Charges. 

'Phone 158. 

a 

A Large Selection 

of 
Plain & Fancy 
Cakes. 



♦ 



.^ 



<•> 



& 



High-class 
CHOCOLATES, 
SWEETS, &c. 

H 

C% " rtt Brothers 

v^~ / Also 
«fc^ / Cromarty Buildings, STRATHPEFFER 



o 



PROPRIETORS, 

46 & 48, ACADEMY STREET. 

'Phone 158. 

Branch — Tea Rooms, 53, High St. 
'Phone 159. 



'Phone 9. 



Inverness 



INVERNESS. 



CALEDONIAN MOTOR WORKS 

WATERLOO PLACE. 

Proprietor - - J. STUART OLIVER. 




GARAGE ACCOMMODATION for 40 CARS- 

Repairs and Overhauls, Spares and Accessories. 
Agent for: Waverley, Singer, Willis, Knight, Overland, 
■ phone 155. Crossley, Guy, &c. 

LOCH AWE HOTEL 



x.oc: 



J^-^VJES 




Magnificently Situated in Private Grounds. Electric Light Throughout. 

MOTOR GARAGE with Lock-ups. Petrol and Oil. 

Motor Car for Hire. Boating. Salmon and Trout Fishing. 

T. W. CURRIE, Manager. 



Illustrated Tariff on 
Application. 



Family of late D. FRASER, Proprietors. 



Loch Lomond — Oban 



LOCH LOMOND, BALLOCH. 

Tullichewan Hotel 

FOOT OF LOCH LOMOND. 

'T'HIS HOTEL is picturesquely situated in Its Own Extensive Pleasure 
■*■ Grounds. It adjoins Balloch Station and Pier, and occupies the most 
central position in the West of Scotland for doing the LOCH LOMOND and 
TROSSACHS TOUR, LOCH LONG, the CLYDE WATERING PLACES 
and STIRLING. On main Motoring Highway to the Northern and Western 
Highlands. Officially appointed by the A. A., R.S.A.C. and A.C.U. Excellent 
Salmon and Trout Fishing. Boating. Tennis. Golf. Garage. 

'Phone 52 Alexandria. 

OBAN. 

GREAT WESTERN HOTEL. 

Largest and Leading Hotel in West Highlands. 

OFFICIAL Hotel R.S.A.C, A.A. & A.A. of America and 
A.C. de France. Smoking Lounge overlooking Bay 
and Yacht Anchorage Lift. Elec. Light Throughout. Motor 
'Bus attends Trains and Steamers. Garage. Petrol. Mod. 
Tariff. Inclusive Terms can be arranged for lengthened 
stay. ALEX. McGREGOR, Resident Proprietor. 

OBAN. 



ROYAL HOTEL. »™ K,Na 




CENTRALLY Situated, and commands a Magnificent View of Bay. 
Neai Bowling Green and Golf Course. Moderate Tariff. Official 
Hotel A.A., M.U. Spacious Lounge. Garage. Terms on Application. 
Electric Light. 'Phone Ho. 82. HUGH McCUAIG PlloPRIETOR . 



Oban 



25 



OBAN. 



MARINE HOTEL 



ESPLANADE. 




THE Largest and Leading Unlicensed Hotel. Almost opposite Pas- 
senger Pier. Three minutes Station. This Hotel is run on First-class 
lines and is one of the Most Popular in the Country. Is well-known for 
its Moderate Tariff and Excellent Cuisine. Official Hotel R.SA.C, A.A. 
and M.U. Booklet sent. 
Phone 61. Mrs. F. WALTON, Proprietress. 



OBAN. 



KING'S ARMS HOTEL 




"^HIS First-class Family and Tourist Hotel has been 
* rebuilt and greatly enlarged ; faces the Bay, and is the 
Most Central Hotel in the Town. Midway between the 
Railway Station and Steamboat Wharf. Ten minutes' walk 
from new Eighteen-hole Golf Course. Garage for 8 Cars. 
Headquarters A.A. and M.U. Telephone 69. 

J. M. MacTAVJSH, Proprietor & Manager. 



26 Oban 



From a Trout Fly to Steam Yacht. 



JOHN MUNRO, Ltd 

LORN IRONMONGERY AND 
HIGHLAND YACHT DEPOT, 



Every Requisite Ashore and Afloat for 

Yachting, Motoring, 

Fishing, Shooting. 

Steam Yachts and Launches for 
Sale or Hire. 

Motor Cars & Launches for Sale. 

MOTOR CHAR-A-BANC TOURS TO LOCH LOMOND, 
INVERARAY, GLEN NANT, &c, DAILY. 

Full Particulars on Handbills. 

Motor Garage. Gars for Hire. 

Large 5tock of Motor Accessories 
of every description. 

Registered Tel. Address :— " Munro, Oban." 
'Phone No. 40. 



Oban 



27 



JOHN McGILVRAY & SON, 

jewellers anD antique Dealers, 
GEORGE STREET, OBAN. 

Large Collection of Antique Silver Dating back to the 
Reign of Charles II. 





IONA JEWELLERY. 

CROSS PENDANTS, PENDANTS IN 

VARIOUS DESIGNS, BROOCHES, 

GUARDS AND NECKLETS IN 

OXIDISED SILVER. 

Designs taken from the Carvings on 
the Stones at lona. 






Also Proprietors of 
THE LORNE JEWEL SHOP, 
ESPLANADE, OBAN. 



Originators of the IONA PEBBLE 
JEWELLERY. 





OLDEST ESTABLISHED JEWELLERS IN OBAN. 



28 



Oban — Peebles — Perth 



OBAN. 




ARGYLL HOTEL 

SITUATED in the Quietest Part 
and most Central Position in 
Town. Hotel Beautifully Situated on 
the Esplanade, and commands a full 
view of the Bay. Immediately above 
the Steamboat Pier, and within three 
minutes' walk of Station. Ladies' 
Drawing Room. Large Smoking 
Room. Excellent Cuisine. Hotel 
Porters meet all Trains and Steamers. 
•Phone 117. A. MACKENZIE, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



OBAN. 



SNAPS ! 



Maison de 
Photographic. 

H. M. SCRIVENS, High-class Portraitist. 

All makes of Cameras, Films, Plates and Papers 
in Stock. Amateur Developing and Printing 
promptly executed. Real Photo Hand-tinted 
Sunsets in Gre at Variety. Local Views a Speciality. 

PEEBLES HOTEL HYDRO 

600 feet above Sea Level. '3?5^1^p^ip=igggggg=ppg|g^gg? — 
A PALATIAL HOTEL with thegf 
Baths Installation of a- Con- 
tinental Spa. Skilled . and 
Experienced Bath Attendants. 
Lovely Scenery. 
Pure Bracing Air. 
Accommodates 3ooGuests. Every 
Amusement. Spacious Ballroom. 
Orchestra. Delightful Grounds. 
Tennis, Badminton, Bowls. 
Golf : i8-hole Course near. 
GARAGE. 
Send for Tariff to the Manager. 

perth. STATION HOTEL 

TJNRIVALLED Centre 
for the Tourist, 
whether travelling by- 
Road or-Rail. The Hotel 
is Comfortable and Con- 
venient. The Charges 
Moderate. Own Garage. 

'Phone 741 (3 lines). 
Proprietors- L. M & S. and L. & N. E. Railways). 





Perth 29 

PERTH. 

SALUTATION HOTEL. 

Established 1699. 

FAMILY AND TOURIST. 

Officially Appointed R.A.C., S.A.C., A.A., M.U., & A.C.U. 

Central Heating. Electric Cooking. 

Telephone No. 836. W. G. MOWAT, Proprietor. 

PERTH . 

MOTOR SERVICE. 

We have here one of the most COMPLETE MOTOR 
SERVICES in Scotland. 

Spare Parts. Accessories. Supplies. Extensive Repair 
Works. All under Expert Supervision. 

High -class 

Open and Closed 

CARS FOR HIRE 

Any Period. 

Daily Motor Tours Throughout the Summer. 

Telegrams, " Valentines' Garage." 'Phone 407. 

Valentines mz?^ 

CITY HALL SQUARE, PERTH. 

FOR THE GOLFER ON HOLIDAY. 

A new and authoritative work on how to improve your game 

ALL ABOUT GOLF 

By BERT SEYMOUR. 

Winner ot the "News of the World " Tournament, 1921, and the Essex 
Championship, 1922. 

illustrated with 33 Action-Plwtographs and Many Diagrams. 

C X o -fc li 5 - 3XT «ss -fc . 

WARD, LOCK & CO.. LTD., SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON. EC 




3° 



Perth — Pitlochrv 



'PHONE 326 PERTH. 



THE KODAK STORE 



NextG.P.O. 



Every Requisite for 
Amateur Photography. 

Speciality — 
DEVELOPING & PRINTING. 
QUICK RETURNS. 
MODERATE CHARGES. 

EVERYTHING 

OPTICAL. 

. EVERYTHING 

PHOTOGRAPHIC, 

EVERYTHING 

WIRELESS. 

W. B, M^CALLUM, OPTICIAN, 




Photographic Dealer, 

8, SCOTT STREET, 



PERTH. J 



PITLOCHRY. 

First-class HOTEL, 

situated in its Own 
Grounds. Public 
Rooms & Bedrooms 
overlook Flower 
Garden. Electric 
Light Throughout. 
Home Farm and 
Kitchen Garden. 
Garage. 'Phone 12. 
i__ Address — 

MANAGERESS. 



FISHER'S HOTEL. 




■ 

II 1 II A 

L_ 




PITLOCHRY. 



PERTHSHIRE HIGHLANDS. 

First-class FAMILY HOTEL. 2^2° 

Extensive' Private Grounds. Golf Tennis. 

Fishing, Coaching, &c. 

'Phone 35. Telegrams, " Comfort, Pitlochry." 



Pitlochry 



PITLOCHRY. 



McKAY'S HOTEL 

(UNLICENSED). 

TVTEAREST to Station. Well-appointed and Comfort - 
' ^ able. Terms Moderate. Boots meets all Trains. 
Near Garage • Further particulars from 

'Phone 49. G. KERR, Proprietor. 

PITLOCHRY. 



SCOTLAND'S HOTEL 

First-class FAMILY and COMMERCIAL HOTEL. 

Listed : A. A. and A.C.U. 
(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT). 

f* ENTRAJXY Situated for Ben Vrackie, Pass of Killiecran kie, Blair 
^ Atholl and Falls of Tummel. Few minutes' walk to First-class 
18-hole Golf Course. Tennis, Bowling and Fisning. Garage. Lock-ups. 
'Phone 39. Tels., "Scotland's, Pitlochry." 

S. W. KEEBLE, Manager. 



PITLOCHRY. 



W. J. K. GULLAND, 



phone t he CENTRAL GARAGE. open 

O SUNDAY 

FORD SERVICE A SPECIALITY. 



J d 



m 



$) 



A COMPLETE RANGE OF 

ACCESSORIES, OILS AND 

TYRES ALWAYS IN 

STOCK. 







Sole District 


.... — 




Agent for 


.1- 


'■■■ Wm¥% 


The Famous 


1 . 


'IMl^k 


11.9 BEAN 




~1M 


The Car which 




is Value for 




Money. 






TWO 






SEATER 






AND FOUR 






SEATER. 



Telegrams, 
1 Gulland, Pitlochry." 



District Agent for A.B.C., Alvis, Crouch, Hiliman 
Daimler, Rover, Standard, Studebaker. , 



32 



Rothesay 



CRAIGMORE, ROTHESAY. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARDING 
ESTABLISHMENT. 

Situated on Shore and 

Most Fashionable part 

of Craig more. s+^t/ 

Three minutes 
from Pier. 






^ 



Tennis Courts, 
two minutes' walk. 




GOLFING, FISfflNG, 
BOATING, &c. 



Telephone Rothesay 131. 

HUGH BAIRD, Proprietor. 



CRAIG MORE, ROTHESAY 

CRAIGARD h^t a eZ e 




DEAUTIFULLY Situated in Own Grounds with Magnificent Sea Views. 

*-* Bathing from House. Croquet and Putting Greens for use of Visitors. 
Excellent Cuisine. Separate Tables. Central Heating. Fifteen minutes 
Craigmore Pier. 'Buses pass Door 

'Phone 184. • Froprietrix, Mrs. LANG. 



Rothesay 



33 




ROTHESAY . 

BREADALBANE 

BOARD -RESIDENCE 

On Promenade. 

Situated in Own 
Grounds. 

ELECTRIC LIGHT. 

Central for all 
Steamboat and 
Char - a - banc 
Excursions. 

H. NEILSON FYFE. 
'Phone 77. 



ROTHESAY. 



"ASCOG HALL 



JJ BOARD- 
RESIDENCE 




^] EAR Craigmore and Rothesay. Ideal Country Holiday House on 
« Shore. Over two acres Grounds, including Private Tennis Court 
and Putting Green, Beautiful Scenery, &c. 

For Inclusive Moderate Terms apply to C. M'G. BRISBANE, Proprietor. 
'Phone. 209. 



Scotch Series, 1926-27] 



34 Rothesay — Strathpeffer Spa 

CRAIGMORE, ROTHESAY. 

HELEN 5LEA BOARDING-RESIDENCE 

CITUATED on East Bay. Five minutes from 
Pier. Good Centre for Daily Cruises and 
Excursions. Near Sea Baths. Every Comfort. 
Personal Attention. 

Proprietresses, Misses FERGUSON. 

ROTHESAY. 



VENETZIA BOARDING HOUSE 

^.RCr'FX.I. FXiACIS. 

XA/EST Bay Promenade. Magnificent View. 
* * Seven . minutes' walk from Pier. Good 
Table. Homely. Comfortable. Central for Famous 
Clyde Sailings. Moderate Terms. 
Mrs. H. MACNAB. 

STRATHPEFFER SPA. 

TARBAT PRIVATE HOTEL. 




STANDS in Own Grounds, commanding one of the Finest Views of the 
Strath. Southern Exposure. Near to Golf Course, Baths and Wells. 
Excellent Cuisine. Mrs. J. G. YOUNG. 

Telegrams, "Tarbat Hotel, Strathpeffer." 'Phone 36. 



Strathpeffer Spa 



35 



STRATHPEFFER SPA. 

MAC GREGOR'S 



Ltier ^B"«3- 



PRIVATE 
HOTEL. 




Close to Golf Course (18 holes). Electric Light. Tennis 
and Bowls. Miss STEVENSON, Proprietrix. 



SPORT ON HOLIDAY . 

A. fascinating and intimate new volume on 

LAWN TENNIS 



MISS KATHLEEN McKANE. 

Illustrated by Action-Photographs and many Diagrams. 

Cloth, 5/- net. 

" Miss Kitty McKane is a great lavourite with those 
who watch first-class lawn tennis, and it is certain that 
her treatise on the game will have a wide circulation. 
The action-photographs of herself in play are delightful 
to look at." — Morning Post. 

From all Booksellers. 
WARD, LOCK & CO., Lid.. Salisbury Sq., London, E.C.4. 



36 



Steamer Routes 



THE NORTH OF SCOTLAND 
and ORKNEY and SHETLAND 
STEAM NAVIGATION Co., Ltd. 




HOLIDAY CRUISES 



from Leith and Aberdeen to Caith- 
ness, Orkney and Shetland, also from 
Thurso to Orkney. 



ST. MAGNUS HOTEL 



HiLlswick (Shetland), belonging to the 
Company. Open June, July, August 
and September. Inclusive tickets from 
Leith and Aberdeen. 



First-class 
accommodation 
and cuisine. 
Grand Rock 
Scenery. Both 
Loch and Sea 
Fishing Free. 



For particulars apply to — 

James McCallum, Manager, 

Matthews' Quay, Aberdeen, 

and 

William Merrylees, Agent, 

i. Tower Place, Leith. 



Steamer Routes 37 



LONDON TO SCOTLAND BY SEA. 

THE ABERDEEN STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY'S finely 
appointed Passenger Steamers sail from Aberdeen Wharf, 
Limehouse, E., every Wednesday and Saturday with 
corresponding Return Sailings from Aberdeen. 

The Steamers are luxuriously fitted up and replete with every 
comfort. First-class Cuisine. Moderate Fares. 

The Company's Steam Tender Ich Dien leaves Westminster 
Pier with passengers for the Steamers one hour before the 
advertised times of sailing from Limehouse ; she also attends 
the Steamers on arrival in London for the purpose of conveying 
passengers to that Pier. 

Delightful Tours to the Deeside Highlands (including Ballater, 
Balmoral, Braemar, &c), also to the Valleys of the Dee, Don, 
and Spey. 

Aberdeen is the best and most convenient point of departure 
for Tourists visiting all parts of the North of Scotland, also the 
Orkney and Shetland Islands. 

Motor Cars conveyed at very moderate rates. Carried on 
deck at shipper's risk. 

For berths and further information apply to George Mutch, Agent, The 
Aberdeen Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., Aberdeen Wharf, Limehouse, E. ; 
Pitt & Scott, Ltd., 25, Cannon St., E.C. ; Geo. W. Wheatley &Co., Ltd., 
46/48, Beak St., Regent St., W., London; Alex. Murray & Co., 412, 
Union St., Aberdeen : Mackay Bros. &Co., 35A, Union St., Aberdeen ; or 
to Edward J. Savage, Manager, Waterloo Quay, Aberdeen. 



T M 



ABERDEEN, NEWCASTLE & HULL STEAM 



CO., 
LTD. 



AN IDEAL HOLIDAY BY SEA 

The Luxurious Passenger Steamer S.S. " Highlander " (Stewards 
and Stewardesses carried), Sails WEEKLY from 

HULL and NEWCASTLE to ABERDEEN. 

Quickest, Cheapest 
and Best Route to 

^&£S^& DEESIDE, DONSIDE 

ViJ * and 

■■I :: - HT3 3§ \ SCOTTISH 

■ HIGHLANDS 

&&H WUd Illustrated Pamphlet Post 

Free on application to 

«■* ^H B9H 1AS - V0UNG > Manager, 

"■5? ,,, * ! S'»«Jo'2Mj33 B 79, Regent Quay, Aberdeen 

JAS. W. THOMPSON, 
77, Quayside, 
Jjfe Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

■^■■■■^■^■^■^■^■■^^^B JOHN 

Balmoral. Princes Pock Street, Hull 



38 Steamer Routes 



SCOTLAND & IRELAND 



TRAVEL BY THE 



ROYAL MAIL ROUTE 

via ARDROSSAN 



OR BY THE 

FAST PASSENGER SERVICES BETWEEN 

GLASGOW and BELFAST 

(direct) 

GLASGOW and DUBLIN 

(VIA GREENOCK) 

GLASGOW and 

LONDONDERRY 

(VIA GREENOCK) 

Through Bookings between tbe I The Company's Time Table, Fare 
Principal Stations in Scotland List and Full Information may 
and Ireland. be'Obtained on Application. 

Passengers and their Luggage, Goods and Live Stock are 

carried subject to the Conditions specified in the Company's 

Sailing Bills. 

BURNS & LAIRD LINES, Ltd., 

52, ROBERTSON STREET, GLASGOW. 



Steamer Routes 39 



D. P. & L. 



Telegrams : J ^ W. " Telephone : 

"Cowper, Dundee." I " fW No. 3075 Dundee. 



The Dundee, Perth & London Shipping 

CO., LTD. 

Passenger Service : — 

Dundee to London Every Saturday. 
London to Dundee Every Wednesday. 

The S.S. "PERTH," fitted with all Modern Conveniences, affords a most 

Luxurious means of Travelling between London and Dundee, which is within 

easy reaching distance of the Highlands of Scotland. 

Steamers Sail (DUNDEE WHARF, LlMEHOUSE, LONDON, E., and 

from \ Victoria Dock, Dundee. 

For furlhcr Particulars apply to — 
Branch Office : 61, MARK LANE, LONDON, E.C.3, or to 

Head Office : 26, EAST DOCK STREET, DUNDEE. 

RALPH C. COWPER, General Manager. 



An Alphabetically arranged List of 

Hotels, 
Boarding Establishments, 



Schools, 



House and 



Estate Agents, 



At the Principal Holiday and Health Resorts 
will be found at the end of this Guide. 



4° 



Edinburgh 




JENNERS. EDINBURGH. 
" The Most Fashionable Shopping Centre 



<f 



in Scotland." 

Jenners Luncheon and Tea 
Rooms overlook Princes 
Street, and are noted for 
Excellent Cuisine and 
Courteous Service. 




ERS 



PRINCES STREET EDINBURGH 



ABERDEEN. 

Angling. — Free or nominally free fishing in the lower waters of the Dee. Until 
July visitors at the Imperial Hotel can fish part of the Dee at Culter, 8 miles 
distant, and visitors at the Grand Hotel can have salmon fishing on the 
Dee and the Don by arrangement. 
Bathing. — In addition to good open sea-bathing, almost every kind of bath can 
be had in a splendid bathing establishment overlooking the beach and 
owned and managed by the Corporation. One of its principal features 
is a large swimming pond filled with pure sea water heated to 70 Fahr. 
During the summer, tramcars run every few minutes between Market 
Street and the Bathing Station. 
Boating. — On the Dee. 
Cab Fares (liable to revision). — ■ 
By Distance — 
One mile or under 1/6. Every additional half mile or part thereof, gd. For 
any distance beyond 5 miles from General Post Office — Special scale of 
rates. 

By Time — - 

Within city boundary, for shopping, calls, etc. : — 
First hour or part thereof, 4s. ; every additional 15 minutes or part 
thereof, is. 

For an airing within city boundary or into the country and returning : — 
First hour or part thereof, 5s. ; every additional half hour, 2/6. 
Taxi-Cabs — 

By Distance — 
One mile or under, for a party of four grown-up persons, is. 6d. ; for every 
additional half mile or part thereof, gd. 
By Time — 
For any distance beyond 5 miles from the General Post Office — Special 
agreement. 
Waiting : per hour, 4s. ; per 15 minutes, is. 

Applicable to both kinds of vehicles : — 
Double fares between 11.30 p.m. and 5.30 a.m., except where hiring begins 
before 11.30 and ends before 11.45. 

Sunday fares — Same as on week-days. 

Two children over 6 and under 12 count as one adult, but no charge for 
one or for a child under 6. 56 lbs. luggage free. Excess, 6d. Bicycle, 
Mail cart or Perambulator, 6d. 
Churches and Chapels. — The following are the principal : — 



Established Church of Scotland. 

The East and West, Union Street ; 

Greyfriars, Broad Street ; Rubis- 

law, Queen's Cross ; Ferryhill, 

Ferryhill Road ; St. Kinian's, 

Mid-Stocket Road; Old Machar 

(Cathedral), Old Aberdeen. 
United Free Church. — East, School- 
hill ; West, Union Street ; Queen's 

Cross, Queen's Cross ; St. 

Nicholas, Union Grove ; Carden 

Place, Carden Place ; Belmont 

Street, Belmont Street ; Soutk, 

Rosemount Viaduct. 
Free. — St. Columba, Dee Street. 

Sunday services usually at 11 a.m. and 6 or 6.30 p.m. 
Aberdeen (b) 27 



Congregational — Belmont Street, 
Skene Street, St. Paxil Street, Bon- 
Accord, Bon-Accord Terrace. 

Baptist — Crown Terrace. 

Episcopal — St. Andrew's Cathe- 
dral, King Street ; St. James's, 
Union Street ; St. John's, St. 
John's Place ; St. Margaret's, 
Gallowgate ; St. Mary's, Carden 
Place. 

Roman Catholic — St. Mary's 
Cathedral, Huntly Street. 

Wesleyan — Crown Terrace. 

Friends— 98, Crown Street, 10.30 
and 6.30. 



18 ABERDEEN 

Distances. — By rail: Birmingham, 434 miles; Edinburgh, no; Glasgow, 
152 ; Inverness, 108 ; Liverpool, 356 ; London, 540. By road : Ban- 
chory, 18 miles ; Banff, 46 ; Braemar, 58 ; Dundee, 66 ; Elgin, 66 ; 
Fraserburgh, 42 ; Inverness, 104 ; Perth, 82 ; Peterhead, 33. 

Early Closing Days. — Wednesday and Saturday. 

Golf. — On the Balgownie Links, beyond the Bridge of Don, about 2 miles from 
the centre of the city, is the magnificent 18-hole course of the Royal Aberdeen 
Club. 

Adjoining on its northern side is the 18-hole course of the Murcar Club. 
Visitors' fees : A weekday, 2s. ; Saturdays and public holidays, 2s. 6d. ; 
Sundays, 3s. 6d. ; ys. 6d. per week ; 12s. 6d. per fortnight ; 21s. per month. 
There is also a ladies' course of 9 holes. 

On the south-east side of the city, overlooking the harbour entrance and 
the Eay of Nigg, is the 18-hole course of the Balnagask Club. Visitors' fees : 
is. 6d. per round or2s. per day ; weekly, 6s. 6d. ; fortnightly, 10s. ; monthly, 
15s. 

At Bieldside, about 5 miles west of the city, the Deeside Club has an 
18-hole inland course. Visitors, 2s. per day ; 5s. per week ; 9s. per fort- 
night ; 15s. per month ; 21s. per four months ; 31s. 6d. per eight months ; 
42s. per year. 

On the Links adjoining the Beach Esplanade is a Municipal 18-hole 
course. Fee per round: visitors 8d., residents 4d. Visitors 'can become tem- 
porary members of any of the clubs using these links on payment of is. 6d. 
for two weeks and 2s. 6d. a month. 

There is also a 9-hole course at Newburgh, on the east coast, connected 
with Aberdeen by a motor omnibus service, and there are an 18-hole and a 
9-hole course at Cruden Bay. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Market Days. — Tuesday and Friday. 

Motor Omnibuses are run by the Great North of Scotland Railway Company 
between Aberdeen (Schoolhill Station) and Newburgh, Echt, Midmar, 
Skene, Dunecht, and.Cluny, and intermediate places, at convenient hours . 

Picture Houses. — The Picture House, Union Street; La Scala, Union Street. 
(Many others.) 

Post Office. — The General Post Office, in Crown Street, about three minutes' walk 
from the station, is open on week-days from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. ; on Sun- 
days from 9 to 10 a.m., and from 1 to 2 p.m. The Telegraph Office is always 
open. 

Public Library and Reading Room. — On Rosemount Viaduct, at the junction 
of Union Terrace and Schoolhill. Open daily from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Railway Station. — This is the joint property of the Caledonian and Great North 
of Scotland Companies. It is in the vicinity of the Docks, and is but a 
short distance from the principal thoroughfare — Union Street. 

Sea Fishing. — Excellent. 

Steamboats to or from Edinburgh (Leith), North of Scotland ports, Hull, London, 
and Newcastle. Full particulars respecting fares and times of sailing may 
be obtained from the North of Scotland and Orkney and Shetland Steam 
Navigation Company, Aberdeen, the Aberdeen Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, Aberdeen, and The Aberdeen, Newcastle, and Hull Steamship Com- 
pany, Aberdeen. See also p. 12. 

Theatres. — His Majesty's, Rosemount Viaduct ; Tivoli (varieties), Guild Street ; 
Palace Theatre of Varieties, Bridge Place. 

Tramways. — The tramways are the property, of the municipality. The route 
covers about 14 miles. The centre is in Castle Street. Cars run at short 
intervals through the principal streets. Full particulars of the service 
will be found in the local time tables. 

For the tourist, Aberdeen combines' the attractions of 
town, country and sea. It is situated on the east coast of 
Scotland between the mouths of the Don and the Dee, and 
consists of an Old Town and a New Town, but which of the 




Aberdeen. 



ABERDEEN 19 

two is really the older is matter of controversy. The Old 
Town was formerly a separate burgh, called Old Aberdeen, 
but is now amalgamated with the city, which, in contra- 
distinction, used to be called New Aberdeen, lying to the 
north of the more modern portion of Aberdeen. In point of 
general importance Aberdeen holds the third place among the 
cities of Scotland. It is at once a leading port, a manufactur- 
ing town and a seat of learning. 

The principal industries of the city are the quarrying 
and polishing of granite (employing thousands of hands), 
trawl and line fishing, fish-curing, and the making of paper 
and combs, but many also find employment in the manufac- 
ture of linen, cotton and woollen goods, in iron foundries, and 
in ship-building yards. Aberdeen is also the chief Scottish 
port for the White Sea and Baltic trades, is the headquarters 
of the Scottish cattle trade, and few ports in the world have 
as large a trade in white fish and herrings. The value of the 
fish landed in 1919 exceeded ^2,000,000 ; and about 250 
steam trawlers fish from the port regularly. 

The chief feature which strikes the stranger is the beauty 
and regularity of the architecture of the principal streets — 
a feature in great measure due to the city having been largely 
re-built since the formation of its principal thoroughfare, 
Union Street, in 1800. The buildings are mainly constructed 
of a light grey variety of granite, and on account of the 
general use of this material, Aberdeen is familiarly spoken 
of as the " Granite City." 

'• The impression which forces itself upon the visitor is 
the sense of solidity and permanence, and of constant pro- 
gression ; and a little knowledge of its prominent men conveys 
this sense as part of their personality : men of quiet strength, 
fine business perception, and almost stubborn pertinacity of 
purpose, qualities which have doubtless come from their 
surroundings, and which have imbued them with a large 
share of characteristics which are perhaps national. All 
around, in fine buildings and the growth of the city, do we 
see the prosperity which comes out of industry and good 
business foresight and habit." 

Historical Note. 
The municipal history of the town dates from n 79, when 
William the Lion granted a charter giving the burgesses the 
right of trading where and when they pleased. With the 



20 ABERDEEN 

history of the country Aberdeen has several links. In 
1296 the city was visited by Edward I of England. The 
diary of his progress speaks of it as having a " faire castell " 
and being " a good towne vponn the see." Robert the 
Bruce made Aberdeen his headquarters for a considerable 
time, and in 1308 the citizens, on his behalf, stormed the 
castle and put the English garrison to flight. Their watch- 
word was Bon-Accord (Good- will). In remembrance of 
their great achievement that cheery and peaceful phrase 
was adopted as the motto of the city, and has become one 
of its most popular names. Some thirty years after the 
Aberdonians' triumph their city was completely burned by 
the soldiers of Edward III. 

In 1 41 1 the city was threatened with pillage by a Highland 
horde. The burghers, headed by their provost, joined the 
opposing force marshalled by the Earl of Mar. The invaders 
were routed at Harlaw, but the victors also suffered great 
loss. Among the slain was Aberdeen's provost. Armour 
which he is said to have worn is one of the treasures of the 
Town Hall. 

One of the many Scottish sovereigns who visited the city 
was the beautiful Queen Mary, who then had one of her 
many unpleasant experiences, for the "Earl of Moray dragged 
her to a window that she might witness the execution of the 
Earl of Huntly's son, Sir John Gordon, whom it was said 
she loved. 

During the struggles and discord consequent on the Refor- 
mation Aberdeen played a conspicuous part and suffered 
alternately at the hands of the Covenanters and the Catholics. 
Its last siege and capture was by the Royalist Marquis of 
Huntly in 1646, but his success came too late, as a few days 
before it King Charles had delivered himself to the Scottish 
Army at Newark. Since then, with brief interruptions 
during the Jacobite rebellions of 1715 and 1745, Aberdeen's 
story has been one of peace and progress. 

The visitor who is staying but a short time in the city may, 
on foot, make the round of its chief objects of interest in the 
course of two half-day excursions, while one who has only 
an hour or two to spare can obtain a good general idea of 
the place by taking an outside seat on a car on " the circular 
route." There is, however, much in the city that deserves 
and will amply repay leisured and careful inspection, and 
there are many spots where one should linger. Therefore, 



UNION STREET— MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 21 

while indicating the best routes to be followed by those who 
have but limited time at their disposal, we also give particulars 
which, we hope, will enhance the pleasure of those more 
fortunate visitors who are not obliged to hurry. 

I.— TO THE LINKS, THE BRIG 0' BALGOWNIE, AND 
THROUGH THE " AULD TOON." 

The visitor should first make his way eastward along — 

Union Street, 

a fine thoroughfare that extends for about a mile in a straight 
line. It is reached from the station and the quays by way of 
Market Street, near the upper end of which is the Market Hall, 
one of the finest buildings of the kind in the country. It was 
erected in 1840-42, at a cost of £28,000, and was restored 
after a fire in 1882. 

Opposite Market Street are a branch of the North of Scot- 
land and Town and County Bank, a fine building in Roman 
Classic style, and a Statue of Queen Victoria, by C. B. Birch, 
A.R.A. 

The Municipal Buildings, 

a most imposing and picturesque block, were erected in 1868- 
74 at a cost of over ^100,000. Admission to the chief rooms 
and to the tower may be obtained on application to the 
keeper between ten and three o'clock. The main entrance 
is under the steeple. In the adjoining vestibule there stands 
on the right a Statue of Provost Blaikie, by Sir John Steell, 
R.S.A. ; and on the opposite side is a much-valued suit of 
armour said to have been worn by — 

" The gude Schir Robert Davidson, 
Wha provost was of Aberdene," 

and who, as has already been related, was slain at Harlaw, 
in 1411. 

In the vestibule is also a beautiful marble Statue of Queen 
Victoria, by Alexander Brodie, a native of the city. It 
formerly stood at the top of Market Street, but, having 
suffered from exposure to the weather, was removed and 
replaced. 

On the first floor is the Town Hall, a stately chamber. 
The ceiling is adorned with the arms of eminent citizens, 
and the walls with the pictures of some of the city's artist 



22 THE CITY CROSS 

sons — George Jamesone, William Dyce, John Phillip, and Sir 
George Reid. 

The first-named — " The Vandyke of Scotland " — was born about 
1587 and died in r644. " His excellence," says Walpole, " consists 
in delicacy and softness, with a clear and beautiful colouring, his 
shades not charged but helped by varnish, with little appearance 
of the pencil. He had much of Vandyke's second manner ; and 
to Sir Anthony some of his works have been occasionally imputed." 
" He was the first native of our island," says Allan Cunningham, 
" who refused to limit himself to miniatures, and transferred life 
of the natural dimensions to his canvas." 

John Phillip, R.A. (1817-67), was the son of a shoemaker, and was 
apprenticed to a house-painter. He was famous for his pictures 
of Spanish life. One of his works in the Town Hall is a good portrait 
of the Prince Consort. 

The Tower, 200 feet high, is a very effective structure, 
and should be ascended for the sake of the view it affords 
of the city and its vicinity. The time of the Town Hall 
clock is adjusted daily by electric connection with Greenwich. 

At the east end of the Municipal Buildings is the old Tol- 
booth. Its tower was erected in 1616. The spire and clock, 
of later date, are exact copies of the originals. 

Union Street ends at the Municipal Buildings and gives 
place to Castle Street, a wide but short thoroughfare. Here 
stands — 

The City Cross, 
a beautiful six-sided structure, of which the citizens are not 
a little proud, as it is the finest piece of work of its kind in 
the country. It was erected in 1686, on the site of an older 
cross that dated from the days of Robert the Bruce, from 
designs by John Montgomery, an Aberdeenshire mason. It 
was renovated in 1842, and removed to its present site. It is 
1 8 feet high and 20 in diameter. The cornice is divided into 
twelve compartments, ten of which are filled by medallions 
of Scottish sovereigns from James I to James VII ; the 
other two contain the arms of Scotland and of Aberdeen. 
A graceful column, wreathed with thistles, springs from the 
centre, and terminates in a Corinthian capital, which supports 
a white marble unicorn, bearing a shield charged with the 
Scottish lion. 

In front of the Cross is a colossal Statue of the Duke of 
Gordon, Marquis of Huntly, who died in 1836. He was 
Colonel, first of the 92nd, afterwards of the 42nd Highlanders, 
and it was he whom Scott addressed as — 




C. Helmrich & Sons,] [Aberdeen. 

UNION STREET ROSEMOUNT VIADUCT — QUEEN'S CROSS. 

A berdeen. 3 



CASTLE HILL— QUEEN'S LINKS 23 

" Cock of the North, my Huntly braw, 
Whaur are you wi' the Forty-twa ? " 

The statue is of Aberdeen granite, and was intended to 
show how that stone lent itself to such a use. 

Just beyond the Municipal Buildings is King Street, a 
long, broad thoroughfare running northward to the Bridge 
of Don. At the corner is the head office of the North of 
Scotland and Town and County Bank. 

At its eastern extremity, Castle Street is faced by a Salva- 
tion Arm} - Citadel, a pile quite in harmony with the stately 
blocks close by. The castellated turret commands wide 
views. To the right, at the Citadel, is Castle Terrace, to the left 
Justice Street. On the former stood the Futtie Port, one of 
six gates which formerly helped to protect citizens from 
hostile incursions ; it owed its name to its being on the way 
to Footdee, formerly a detached fishing village known as 
Futtie. A gentle slope from the terrace leads to the Barracks 
of the Gordon Highlanders. The boundary wall of the 
parade ground is said to be part of the fortifications raised 
by General Monk's men in 1651. Castle Hill, by the way, is 
one of the best points from which to look down upon the 
city and its environs. 

Connected with Castle Hill by a bridge on the eastern 
side is Heading Hill, an eminence owing its name to the fact 
that it was the place of execution when decapitation was the 
mode of death. 

Our way to the Links lies along Justice Street, which 
inclines towards the north and soon merges in Park Street, 
out of which we turn on the right into Constitution Street. 
This terminates on — 

The Queen's Links, 
a public recreation ground in the immediate vicinity of the 
Bathing Station, where are bathing coaches, floating platforms 
and covered baths, the property of the municipal authorities, 
who have developed the facilities for sea-bathing and added 
to the comfort and pleasure of visitors by the construction 
of a promenade, the erection of refreshment-rooms, and the 
provision of seats. On the adjacent Links is the Municipal 
Golf Course {see p. 18). 

Aberdeen has a beach of firm, clean sand, extending for 
some 2 miles between the mouths of the Dee and the 
Don. At the southern end of the crescent formed by the 



24 AULD BRIG O' BALGOWNIE 

beach is the North Pier, a great barrier some 2,000 feet long 
and 30 broad. 

From the Bathing Station, the visitor may either proceed 
northward to the Don by the beach, or may go westward 
along Urquhart Road (passing on the left the City Fever 
Hospital) until King Street is reached, and thence travel by 
tramcar, passing almost at once, on the right, the School of 
Domestic Science. By the beach it is a pleasant walk of 
about a mile and a half to the mouth of the river. Then a 
few hundred yards along the south bank lead to the handsome 
New Bridge of Don, which was finished in 1830. It is a ter- 
minus of the tramway. From it one may proceed by a by- 
road on the north side of the stream, or by a footpath along 
the south bank, to — 

The Auld Brig o' Balgownie, 
or the old Bridge of Don, a picturesque structure noteworthy 
as being the oldest bridge in the North. It spans the river 
with a high, single-pointed arch, 57 feet wide, just where the 
stream flows from a narrow defile overhung with trees. It 
was most probably erected in 1320 by Bishop Cheyne of 
Aberdeen. The prelate favoured the English during the 
struggle which the Scots waged for independence, and as a 
consequence had to seek safety in flight across the Border. 
On the conclusion of peace he was pardoned by Bruce and 
allowed to return to his diocese, and then, according to the 
story, the revenue of the see which had accumulated during 
his absence was devoted to building the bridge. In 1605 
Sir Alexander Hay devised for its maintenance a small pro- 
perty producing £2 5s. 8£d. a year, but so great became the 
increase in the value of the legacy that the proceeds sufficed 
for the erection of the New Bridge, and the capital now 
amounts to some £30,000. 

Not a little of the interest which the Old Bridge excites 
must be attributed to Byron's allusion to it in a note to Don 
Juan. " The Brig of Don, near the ' auld toun ' of Aber- 
deen," says the poet, " with its one arch, and its deep black 
salmon stream below, is in my memory as yesterday. I still 
remember, though perhaps I may misquote, the awful proverb 
which made me pause to cross it, and yet lean over it with 
childish delight, being an only son, at least by the mother's 
side. The saying, as recollected by me, was this, but I have 
never heard or seen it since I was nine years of age : — 



ST. 1NIACHAR CATHEDRAL 25 

' Brig o' Balgownie, black's your wa\ 
Wi' a wife's ae son, and a mear's ae foal, 
Doun ye shall fa' ! ' " 

If local tradition may be credited, the young poet was so 
impressed with the legend that, on one occasion, in riding 
towards the bridge to cross it, he dismounted and walked, 
remounting his pony on the other side. 

Trams from the Queen's Statue to the New Bridge of Don 
run every few minutes. They turn out of Union Street 
into King Street. Mention has already been made of the 
North of Scotland Bank, at the corner. The other chief 
objects of interest en route include St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Cathedral on the right-hand side, in which is a statue by 
Flaxman of Bishop Skinner, son of the author of Tuttoch- 
gorum ; the North Parish Church, almost opposite St. An- 
drew's, having an Ionic portico surmounted by a tower 150 
feet high, and modelled on Demosthenes 's lantern at Athens ; 
the King Street Public School, and the School of Domestic 
Science. 

From the south side of the Auld Brig the way is through 
the village of Seaton to Old Aberdeen proper. Entering 
Chanonry, the first opening on the right-hand side of the very 
long Don Street, one is faced by — 

St. Machar Cathedral, 
now consisting of nave and aisles only, and used as the parish 
church. The building occupies the site of a rude church 
erected about 570 by St. Machar, one of Columba's disciples, 
who, according to tradition, was sent by his master towards 
the northern part of the land of the Picts, with instructions 
to proceed until he came to a spot where the river took the 
form of a bishop's crook, and there he was to found a church. 
The visitor who takes his stand at the north-east side of the 
Cathedral and there follows with his eye the course of the 
Don through Seaton Vale, will see how faithfully St. Columba 
was obeyed. 

The existing structure was begun about 1366 and com- 
pleted in 1532. A great steeple, containing a peal of fourteen 
bells, fell in 1688, crushing the chancel and greatly damaging 
the nave. Now the most striking external features of the 
Cathedral are the twin battlemented towers, surmounted 
by short spires, built by Bishop Gavin Dunbar (1519-32), and 
the round-headed portal and the seven-lighted window of 



26 KING'S COLLEGE 

the west end. These latter form part of the granite work 
built by Bishop Leighton (1422-40). 

Entrance to the Cathedral is obtained by the gateway by 
the side of the sexton's lodge, at which application should be 
made when the building is found closed. 

Of the interior features most worthy of notice one is the 
flat ceiling of panelled oak added by Bishop Dunbar, " with 
its eight-and-forty shields, glittering with the heraldries of 
the Pope (Leo X), the Emperor (Charles V), St. Margaret, 
the Kings and Princes of Christendom, the Bishops and the 
Earls of Scotland." A coloured window at the east end of 
the south wall commemorates three famous Aberdeen artists 
— Jamesone, Dyce, and Phillip. In a richly-carved niche 
in the south transept, now open to the sky, is the tomb of 
Bishop Dunbar, but the "effigy upon it is not the original 
figure. In the north transept is the effigy of Bishop Leighton. 
Barbour, author of The Bruce, was a canon of the cathedral, 
and his grave is within its walls. He died in 1395. 

Near the Cathedral, a low-roofed house (No. 9, Chanonry) 
with a small belfry will probably attract attention. It is 
an institution for widows and daughters of burgesses of the 
town, and is known as Mitchell's Hospital. 

Pursuing the way from the Cathedral to New Aberdeen 
(towards the left — the south) one passes the Cruickshank 
Botanic Garden on the right, and in a few hundred yards is — 

King's College, 
which has been united with Marischal College to form the 
University of Aberdeen. It is mainly devoted to Arts and 
Divinity, while its sister College is chiefly concerned with 
Science, Medicine and Law. The College was founded by 
Bishop Elphinstone in 1494, and owes its name to the favour 
of James IV. Its handsome lantern spire, topped by a sculp- 
tured crown, forms a striking feature from many points of 
view. The tower was built in 151 5, and rebuilt in 1636. 
The original building was greatly added to by Elphin- 
stone 's successor, Bishop Gavin Dunbar, and there are modern 
portions erected in 1826 and between i860 and 1870. The 
building now forms a square. Of the earliest work, the 
only parts remaining are the Chapel and the massive tower 
attached to it. These stand on the northern side, and the 
visitor will at once see that their style of architecture differs 
from that of the later buildings. 




Valentine & Sons, I Id.,] 

ST. MACIIAR CATHEDRAL. 



[Dundee. 




F. W. hardie,] 



KING S COLLEGE. 

5 



[A berdeen. 



KING'S COLLEGE 27 

The Chapel, built about 1500-6, is an exceedingly good 
specimen of the Scotch Flamboyant Gothic of that period. 
The tower and the round-headed west window are the most 
noteworthy external features. Within, the canopied stalls 
and the choir screen claim special attention. They date 
from the erection of the Chapel, and are the only complete 
set remaining in the country. The design is of great beauty, 
and the carving is exquisitely executed. They are thought 
to be the work of an Aberdeen man named Fendour, who was 
similarly employed for the Church of St. Nicholas. It will 
be noticed that no two panels are alike, and that the Scotch 
thistle is frequently introduced into the delicate lace-work 
tracery of the canopies. The misguided Reformers attempted 
the destruction of this splendid work, but the Principal of the 
University opposed them with an armed force. 

Another object of interest is a pulpit brought from the 
Cathedral. On it are the arms of Bishop William Stewart 
(1540). At the east end stands the throne of Bishop Patrick 
Forbes, a man worthy of remembrance as the most eminent 
of the reformed bishops of Aberdeen. On it is the date 1627. 
On the pavement is a monument of black marble to Bishop 
Elphinstone, and there is a large blue slab in memory of 
Hector Boece, the historian, the first Principal of the College. 
Each tombstone formerly contained an effigy in brass. 

The sumptuous colouring of the Chapel is modern, the 
painting having been done from designs by Sir R. Rowand 
Anderson, architect, Edinburgh. 

Opposite the Chapel is the Library, a modern wing, con- 
taining over 150,000 volumes. Among its treasures are the 
Salisbury Missal, Pope Alexander the Sixth's Deed of Foun- 
dation, and Tippoo Sahib's Koran with annotations by him- 
self. 

In the Senatus Room are portraits of Bishops Elphinstone, 
Dunbar, and Forbes, the three most munificent benefactors 
of the University in olden days, and various other pictures, 
some by Sir George Reid. On the staircase are portraits of 
Scottish sovereigns, probably copies by pupils of Jamesone. 

Opposite the College is the Oriental Gateway of Powis 
House, flanked by two Moorish towers with minarets. This 
singular structure has been regarded as an outcome of the 
Byron worship that was the vogue in the early years of the 
nineteenth century, the people of Aberdeen naturally being 
among those most affected, as some of the poet's earliest years 



28 MARISCHAL COLLEGE 

were passed in their city ; but it has also been attributed to 
the caprice of one of the proprietors of Powis after a visit 
paid to the East. 

After a long walk along the Spital (a name derived from an 
ancient Hospital, of which no trace remains), one comes to 
the John Knox Parish Church and burying-ground, on the left. 
The church was rebuilt in 1911. Straight ahead is Gallow- 
gate, a squalid thoroughfare along which those condemned to 
be hanged were conducted to the Gallow Hill. It is one of 
the oldest and poorest parts of the city, and merges in Broad 
Stre9t, in which is — ■ 

Marischal College, 
a spacious and most elegant pile, built entirely of light-grey 
granite, which looks almost pure white when seen in the 
sunshine. The style of architecture is Gothic, of the English 
Perpendicular period. 

In all the world there is only one granite edifice, the Palace 
of the Escurial in Spain, which exceeds Marischal College 
in size, but the Aberdeen structure, for the grace, beauty 
and nobility of its main elevation, is probably unsurpassed 
by any erection constructed of similar material elsewhere. 

The buildings stand on a site once occupied by a monastery 
and gardens belonging to the Order of Grey Friars. The 
rightful owners having been dispossessed, their property 
was assigned by James VI to George Keith, fifth Earl Maris- 
chal, who, in 1593, converted the monastery into a college. 
The building was partially burned down in 1639, and the 
structure which replaced it gave way in turn, in 1840, to the 
central block of the present buildings. 

The late Dr. Charles Mitchell and Mr. Charles W. Mitchell of 
Newcastle, father and son, built and equipped the Mitchell 
Hall and Tower and the Students' Union at a cost of upwards 
of ^30,000. The late Lord Strathcona, at first Lord Rector 
and then Chancellor of the University, contributed ^25,000 
to another extension. Other philanthropists, with more 
slender purses, gave with a good grace, and it was the pride of 
many a needy Scot to put down a solitary piece of gold or 
silver for the furtherance of an object very near his heart. A 
grant of ^40,000 was obtained from the State, and altogether 
the sum spent in the acquisition of the property and the 
erection of the premises amounted to about ^250,000. In 
September, 1906, King Edward VII, accompanied by Queen 



MARISCHAL COLLEGE 29 

Alexandra, opened the range of buildings, 400 feet in length, 
facing Broad Street and forming the fourth side of the square. 
A notable feature of this is the exquisite f acade of the gateway, 
the arch of which bears a heraldic scheme illustrating the 
history of King's and Marischal Colleges and the United 
University. Cut in simple relief in the granite are the coats 
of arms of the University, Bishop Elphinstone, Earl Marischal, 
Old Aberdeen, the City of Aberdeen, Lord Strathcona and Dr. 
Charles Mitchell. 

The central building is entered under the great Mitchell 
Tower, named after its donor and remarkable for its fine pro- 
portions. Its height is 260 feet. The tower can be ascended, 
and on a fine day affords, as may be imagined, an extensive 
and agreeable prospect. Eastward the sea stretches for many 
a mile ; westward the view is bounded by the Grampians, and 
the city is spread out beneath. 

Over the inner door, in quaint lettering and still quainter 
spelling, is the motto of the Keith Marischal family : Thay 
haif said. Quhat say thay ? Lat thame say. 

The story goes that the enrichment of the Earl Marischal with the 
spoils of the religious orders excited the indignation of the people, 
and troubled the conscience of his wife, who particularly desired 
that her lord should return the property that had belonged to the 
Abbey of Deer. Upon his absolute refusal she had a dream in 
which she saw monks of that Abbey undermine the Castle of Dun- 
nottar, the principal residence of the family, and cause it to fall 
into the sea. This vision she took as an intimation of the speedy 
downfall of the Keiths as a punishment for adding to their posses- 
sions at the expense of the Church. But her husband only laughed 
at her forebodings, and to show his contempt for them and for the 
reproaches of the people took for his motto the defiant words 
quoted above. 

The chief apartment in the great pile is the Mitchell Hall, 
reached by way of the Picture Gallery. The lower part, 
including the Gallery, which is most beautifully carved, is of 
oak, while the upper portion is of Corennie granite. At the 
east end is a magnificent window that by means of portraits 
and heraldic devices tells the story of the University from 
its foundation to the present time. At the opposite end is an 
organ, another gift of Dr. Mitchell. It cost about £1,200. 
The roof of the hall is of richly-carved oak, and the floor is of 
oak parquet. There is accommodation for thirteen hundred 
persons. 

Within the quadrangle, blocking the way for the extension 



30 EAST AND WEST CHURCHES 

of the College buildings, stood the Groyfriars Church. It 
was consequently rebuilt at the Queen Street corner of the 
noble pile, of which, indeed, it appears to be a constituent 
part, being identical in style and material. 

In one of the old houses that were swept away to make 
room for the extension of Marischal College, Byron lived 
when a boy. The poet's reminiscences of Aberdeen will be 
found in Moore's Life of Byron. 

The visitor who is interested in old houses with historical 
associations may find one near at hand. On the western 
side of Broad Street is Netherkirkgate. It is the first opening 
above the junction with Union Street, and leads, at the 
end of some twenty yards, to Guestrow, on the right, once 
a part of the aristocratic quarter of the city. One of the 
oldest and most interesting houses now standing in it is 
that bearing the number 45. Some of its walls date from 
1580, and within them the Duke of Cumberland was enter- 
tained during the memorable '45. Arches and an iron gate 
are other relics here of a more prosperous past. 

II— THROUGH THE NEW TOWN. 

Starting from the Queen's Statue and proceeding west- 
ward along Union Street, there is, almost at once on the 
right, an open Ionic colonnade, separating the busy thorough- 
fare from a large cemetery, the Town's Churchyard, behind 
which are — 

The East and West Churches, 

forming a continuous building the chief external feature of 
which is a modern Gothic tower and spire. These twin 
churches occupy the site of the old Church of St. Nicholas, 
which was built in various stages and at various dates between 
1200 and 1507 and at the Reformation was the largest parish 
church in the country. It was then divided, the choir and 
nave being converted into separate churches, which were 
named in accordance with their respective positions. The 
West Church, having become ruinous, was rebuilt in 1755 from 
designs by James Gibbs, an Aberdonian settled in London, 
who enjoyed the reputation of being the leading architect of 
his day. Within the edifice are several objects of interest. 
These include a unique brass tablet of the seventeenth century, 
an oak pulpit finely carved, and some tapestries wrought by 



EAST CHURCH— TRINITY HALL 31 

Mary Jamesone, daughter of the great Aberdeen painter. 

The old East Church, that in its original form dated from 
the middle of the fifteenth century, was replaced, in 1837, by 
another, which was gutted by fire in 1874, the quaint old 
steeple being also destroyed, along with a fine peal of bells. 
A new peal of 37 bells was placed in the new tower in 1887 in 
celebration of Queen Victoria's Jubilee. 

The transept which separates the two churches is itself 
divided into Collison's Aisle, on the north, and Drum's Aisle, 
on the south. The latter contains two monumental effigies 
belonging to the fourteenth century. They commemorate 
one of the lairds of Drum and his lady. The aisle also con- 
tains the only mediaeval brass now to be found in Scotland. 
In Collison's Aisle may be seen some mediaeval tablets and the 
effigy of the warlike Provost Davidson, who was slain at 
Harlaw. 

The Crypt of the Great Church of St. Nicholas is used for 
religious services in connection with the East Church and is 
reached from Correction Wynd. It was built in the fifteenth 
century, and is dedicated to St. Mary. 

Beyond the churches is Union Bridge, a handsome granite 
Viaduct of a single arch, having a span of 130 feet. Unfortun- 
ately, the fine proportions of the bridge are obscured by a 
steel arch rib erected on each side to allow the widening of the 
roadway. The bridge carries the street across the railway 
and the Denburn Valley, the latter laid out as a public garden, 
known as the Union Terrace Gardens. 

Before crossing the bridge, the visitor should notice, at 
its south-eastern extremity — 

Trinity Hall, 
sometimes called the Trades Hall, because it is the property 
of the seven incorporated trades (the bakers, fleshers, weavers, 
shoemakers, tailors, hammermen, and the wrights and 
coopers). It is a fine granite structure, and among its 
notable features are a marble staircase and a large hall. 
There are also interesting portraits, including some by the 
" Scottish Vandyke," a set of carved antique chairs, one 
of which is known as King William's, and two others dated 
1564 and 1574 respectively. The visitor should also notice 
the curious inscriptions on the shields of the various crafts. 
Just beyond the bridge is a striking Statue of King Edward 
VII, in granite, by Alfred Dritry, R.A. 



32 UNION STREET— QUEEN'S CROSS 

Then come the offices of the Northern Assurance Company , 
and a little beyond are the Music Hall Buildings, conspicuous 
by their six massive pillars. The chief hall is of great size, 
having accommodation for 2,000 persons. It contains a fine 
organ. The buildings also comprise spacious ball, supper, 
and other rooms. 

The next notable building is the fine office of the Royal 
Assurance Company, at a corner of Huntly Street. 

A short distance up Huntly Street is the Roman Catholic 
Cathedral of St. Mary of the Assumption, a large granite 
structure with a fine spire. The church was built in i860, 
and a few years later the graceful spire was added, together 
with a peal of bells. The interior contains good sculptures, 
and is well worth a visit. It is open daily. 

Continuing along Union Street, there will be passed on 
the left the West United Free Church, a Gothic edifice of 
Morayshire sandstone with an elegant spire 175 feet high. 
Nearly opposite is the United Free Gilcomston Church, 
which also has a fine spire and is built of sandstone and 
granite. 

At the western extremity of the great thoroughfare is the 
United Free Church College, or Divinity Hall, a handsome 
Tudor building in which young men are trained for the 
ministry. 

Here Union Street divides. The right-hand branch 
should be followed. For a short distance it is called Alford 
Place and is then known as Albyn Place. It extends for 
half a mile and is lined by handsome residences and gardens. 
At its western end is — 

Queen's Cross, 

in the neighbourhood of which are the Queen's Cross United 
Free Church, a fine granite building, Rubislaw Parish Church, 
of sandstone, and the Convent of the Sacred Heart. 

At the Cross a sharp turn to the right should be taken 
into Carden Place, where St. Mary's Episcopal Chapel will 
be passed on the right. Under the names of Carden Place 
and Skene Street, this thoroughfare extends for about a 
mile in a north-easterly direction. In Skene Street stands 
the Grammar School, the successor of that in which Byron 
and other celebrities received their early education. 

Skene Street crosses Rosemount Viaduct, and by following 



ROSEMOUNT VIADUCT— GORDON'S COLLEGE 33 

the latter to the right one soon comes to a handsome viaduct 
over the Great North of Scotland Railway (below is School- 
hill station). On the left-hand side of the Viaduct is the 
Public Library, with reference and lending departments and 
a well-equipped reading room. By the side of this institution 
is the South United Free Church, a striking edifice with a 
massive portico and dome. Next to it is His Majesty's 
Theatre, and behind that the Royal Infirmary, originally 
erected about the middle of the eighteenth century and 
enlarged as the city's memorial of Queen Victoria's Jubilee. 
Through the munificence of Lord Mount Stephen it was 
further enlarged in 1911 by the erection of a building on the 
opposite side of the street. 

But perhaps the greatest attraction of this part of the 
city is a colossal bronze Statue of Wallace, who is represented 
in the act of bidding the English soldiers " Go back to your 
masters and tell them that we came not here to treat but 
to fight and set Scotland free." It is the finest statue of the 
Scottish hero in the country, and is a conspicuous landmark 
of the city. It was designed by W. G. Stevenson, A.R.S.A., 
and unveiled in 1888. In a triangular space at the rear 
of the Wallace statue is a bronze Statue of Prince Albert, the 
consort of Queen Victoria, by Marochetti. The statue form- 
erly stood on the site now occupied by that of King Edward 
VII (p. 31). Its unveiling was the first public function 
performed by Queen Victoria in her widowhood. 

Not far away, in Union Terrace, is a Statue of Robert 
Burns, by Henry Bain-Smith, one of the sons of Aberdeen. 

Continuing along the Viaduct, one is led into Schoolhill, 
which owes its name to having been the site of the original 
Grammar School. On the northern side of the thoroughfare 
is — 

Robert Gordon's College, 
named after its founder, Robert Gordon, a Danzig merchant,, 
who died in 1731, leaving a sum of /io.ooo for the carrying 
out of his purpose. The institution received a further large 
endowment in 1821 under the will of Alexander Simpson of 
Collyhill. Many stories are told illustrative of the rigid 
economy by means of which Robert Gordon accumulated 
the funds which produced the school. One is to the effect 
that, rather than buy candles, he was accustomed, when he 
wanted to read at night, to make use of the light that came 
Aberdeen (c) 



34 GORDON'S COLLEGE 

through a hole in the floor from a shoemaker's shop below. 
Gordon provided for the maintenance and education within 
the Hospital he founded of a limited number of sons or grand- 
sons of burgesses of Aberdeen ; but the institution has far 
outgrown the original scheme. In 1881 the "hospital 
system " was abolished and the buildings were converted 
into a College — virtually, a secondary day school — with 
which, latterly, a Technical College has been combined, in- 
struction being now imparted to many hundreds of scholars. 

The College occupies the site of the old Blackfriars' Monas- 
tery, and stands in pleasant grounds. In a niche over the 
doorway is a marble statue of the founder. In the grounds 
are a couple of cannon captured at the fall of Sebastopol. 

On each side of the arched gateway of the College is a 
range of modern buildings in the Grecian style. That 
on the west is the Art Gallery, with a fine selection of sculp- 
ture casts. In it the Artists' Society hold their exhibitions 
and there is frequently on view a selection of antiquities and 
works of art from South Kensington. But the permanent 
collection is of itself worthy of a visit. (The gallery is open 
free daily. On Sundays the hours are 2 to 5.) In 1920 im- 
portant extensions were projected, including a Lecture Hall 
and Art Museum, for which Lord and Lady Cowdray gave 
^20,000, and a War Memorial Court to be erected by public 
subscription. The eastern building is Gray's School of Art. 
It was presented to the town by Mr. John Gray, a magistrate, 
and covers the site of the old Grammar School to which 
reference has been made. 

In front of the College gateway is a bronze Statue of General 
Gordon, erected in 1888 by the subscriptions of members of 
the clan Gordon ; and on the opposite side of the street is 
the Central Higher Grade School. By turning to the right at 
the end of Schoolhill, the visitor passes the East and West 
Churches of St. Nicholas, and so regains the great artery of 
the city. 

3.— THE CIRCULAR TRAM ROUTE. 

By making use of this, the visitor who has but limited time 
may obtain, with the minimum of expense and trouble, a 
good general idea of a considerable portion of the city. 

The car selected should be one that travels via Albyn Place 
and Rosemount Place. These leave the Municipal Buildings 
at short intervals, and the route thence is westward along 



VICTORIA BRIDGE— BRIDGE OF DEE 35 

Union Street, passing the various objects already described 
on pp. 30-32. 

At Queen's Cross the car turns to the right along Fountain- 
hall Road, a residential district beautified by rows of trees. 
At the farther end of the road the outskirts of the city are 
reached and a glimpse of the country is gained. By Beech- 
grove Terrace and Rosemount Place (in the vicinity of 
Victoria Park and the Westburn Park), the car goes eastward, 
leaving the residential thoroughfares for the quarters mainly 
devoted to business. From the middle of Rosemount Place 
it turns to the right into South Mount Street, which is con- 
tinued by Rosemount Viaduct (p. 32), and out of that it turns 
into Union Terrace, which brings one again to Union Street, 
the main thoroughfare. 

4 — BRIDGE OF DEE, DUTHIE PARK, AND THE FISH 
MARKET. 

The Dee at Aberdeen is crossed by three bridges, besides 
that which carries the railway. The Victoria Bridge, a fine 
granite structure, forms a continuation of Market Street. It 
was completed in 1880. The immediate cause of its erection 
was an accident to the ferry boat, resulting in the loss of 
thirty lives. From its northern extremity the Esplanade 
extends right and left. Up the river this road reaches to 
Allenvale Cemetery and Duthie Park, while on the other 
side of the Dee Victoria Road leads to the Balnagask Golf 
Links and the Girdleness Lighthouse. 

Then there is the Wellington Suspension Bridge, a short 
half-mile up the river, connecting the Ferryhill and Torry 
districts. 

Lastly, there is the — 

Bridge of Dee, 

dating back to the sixteenth century. 

It is reached from the west end of Union Street by way of 
Holburn Street, the chief thoroughfare connecting the city 
with the South. Holburn Parish Church is on the right, and 
farther along is St. Nicholas United Free Church. A short 
distance beyond Holburn Street Station is Ruthrieston 
Parish Church. Away in the front and on the left may be 
seen the heights of Kincorth, while on the right are the tree- 
clad slopes of Banchory-Devenick. 



36 BRIDGE OF DEE 

At the Bridge of Dee there is no romantic scenery as in the 
case of the old bridge over the Don. All the attraction is 
in the structure itself and its associations. It is one of the 
oldest bridges in the country. It was begun by Bishop 
Elphinstone and completed by the next bishop but one, 
Bishop Gavin Dunbar. To the latter the sole credit is given 
by an inscribed stone which makes the bridge say, " Gavin 
Dunbar, Bishop of Aberdeen, caused me to be built over the 
river Dee, a.d. 1525." It took the place of a bridge which is 
known to have been standing in 1384, but which in later 
years had fallen. Its arches are seven in number, and as they 
were becoming unsafe in the early years of the eighteenth 
century, they were rebuilt by the Town Council between 
1719 and 1723, as is duly set forth in a Latin inscription on 
the west side of the bridge. In 1 842 the bridge was widened 
to 28 feet to meet the necessities of modern traffic. 

At the northern end used to stand a chapel dedicated to 
the Virgin Mary, and containing an image of " Our Lady of 
Bon Accord." To save the effigy from destruction at the 
hands of the Reformers, it was carried over to Dunkirk, and 
thence conveyed to the Netherlands. It is still in existence, 
and may be seen in a chapel that was specially built for it 
in Brussels in 1852. A facsimile of this statue has been 
placed in St. Peter's Church, Justice Street. 

At the south end of the bridge was a gate and watch-tower 
which served not only to guard the city against surprise 
by a hostile band, but also to prevent the ingress of persons 
likely to introduce pestilence. The remnants of this structure 
were swept away in 1773. 

In 1589 the bridge was held by the Earl of Huntly against 
the royal army ; and in 1639 Viscount Aboyne attempted 
to hold it against the Marquis of Montrose, but after the 
struggle had lasted two days he was obliged to yield possession. 

From the bridge, a pleasant walk can be taken along the 
riverside to the beautiful Allenvale Cemetery, in which are 
buried Archibald Forbes, the famous war correspondent, 
who was an alumnus of King's College, and William Broom- 
field, composer of the sacred air, St. Kilda. 

Duthie Park ■ 
was presented to the city by Miss Duthie of Ruthrieston, and 
opened by Princess Beatrice in 1883. It is about a mile 
from Market Street, but the Ferryhill car can be taken to 



DUTHIE PARK— FISH MARKET 37 

the farther end of Whinhill Road, in the immediate vicinity 
of both the Park and Allenvale Cemetery. The Park com- 
prises 44 acres, and in addition to cricket pitches and tennis 
courts contains several miniature lakes and rockeries, and 
a winter garden which is well worth a visit. Near the en- 
trance on the south side are a Museum and a refreshment 
room. The former is open free every weekday. Near the 
east gate stands a granite memorial of those of the ist Bat- 
talion Gordon Highlanders who died in Egypt and the Soudan 
in 1882—84 '• a memorial to men of the regiment who fell in 
the Indian Frontier campaign of 1898 stands near the west 
gate. In 1898 a Monument of Hygeia, the Goddess of Health, 
was erected in the grounds and dedicated to Miss Duthie. 
The park also contains a fine obelisk of Peterhead granite to 
the memory of Sir James M'Grigor (removed here from the 
quadrangle of Marischal College), one of the old water reser- 
voirs of the city (re-erected), and a collection of stone carvings 
from former buildings. 

Leaving the Park by the gate on the south, turning to 
the left and following the Esplanade Road, the visitor passes 
under the railway bridge, and by continuing along the river- 
side will reach first the Suspension Bridge and then the 
Victoria Bridge, where Market Street may be entered and a 
visit paid to — 

The Fish Market, 

which is built around the Albert Basin. It has been enlarged 
again and again to meet the growing needs of the district and 
is now the largest and finest building of the kind in the country. 
It is also reputed to be the cleanest and best kept. 

But to see the Market at its best, the visitor must be up 
betimes. Here in the early morning the steam trawlers and 
liners deposit what they have gathered of the harvest of 
the sea, ready for the sale that takes place daily at 8 o'clock. 
Such a sight as is presented at that hour can be witnessed 
in few places in the kingdom, for 700 tons of fish are often 
landed in one day and occasionally there are more.. Even 
when the catch has been far less great, so numerous are the 
rows of cod, skate, ling, hake, and other large fish, and so 
many are the boxes of haddock, whiting, and other smaller 
fish, that the visitor probably wonders where it will go and 
how it can all be profitably sold. As the clock strikes eight 
the voice of the salesman is heard, and in a period so short 



38 THE KIRK OF NIGG 

that it must be measured by seconds rather than by minutes, 
and with words and phrases understood only by fisher-folk 
and dealers, rows and piles change hands and are transferred 
to the lorries waiting to convey them to the neighbouring fish- 
curing establishments, to be immediately cleaned and packed 
in boxes. Stalwart women rival men and boys in their efforts 
to effect a speedy clearance of the market, and their bare 
or white-capped heads and short skirts, together with the 
jargon that greets the ear, give quite a foreign air to the 
scene. So expeditious are the proceedings, and so admirable 
the arrangements to facilitate transport, that fish landed 
alive at Aberdeen one morning will be on sale in London in 
the early morning of the next day. Sometimes a shark, seal 
or gigantic kingfish may be seen among the catches of the 
night. 

5.— THE OLD KIRK OF NIGG AND GIRDLENESS 
LIGHTHOUSE. 

Tramcars run every few minutes from Bridge Street to 
Torry, on the south side of the Dee, a fishing village that 
is now incorporated in the municipality of Aberdeen. A 
few hundred yards beyond Balnagask, a road on the right 
leads to the ruins of- — 

St. Fittick's, 

the old parish church of Nigg, situated near the Bay of Nigg. 
Nigg means nook, and is here applied to the peninsula between 
the Dee and the sea. The church is an interesting building 
dating from pre-Reformation days, for it was granted by 
William the Lion to the Abbey of Arbroath. Near the door 
at the west end may be seen three or four links of the appara- 
tus by which " scolds " and other disturbers of the peace 
were publicly exposed to the scorn of quiet and law-abiding 
subjects. Near the south-east corner of the ruin is a fiat 
gravestone to the memory of one " William Milne, indweller 
of Kincorth," whose occupation and status are probably indi- 
cated by the representation of the clapper of a mill and a 
star, and the cause of whose death is set forth in a Latin 
inscription which tells that " One whom piety, probity, 
and the Sacred Covenant of God made happy, is fallen by the 
sword of a savage Irishman." The date is 1645, so that 
the " savage Irishman " was doubtless one of the allies of 
Montrose when the latter sacked Aberdeen. In the north 




Photos by] [Hardie and Helmrfch. 

OLD BRIDGE OF DEE THE BEACH AND BATHING STATION 

NEW BRIDGE OF DON. 
A berdeen. I i 





P/io/.is 5v] [Hardie and Hehnrich. 
GIRDLENESS LIGHTHOUSE THE FISH MARKET THE HARBOUR. 



GIRDLENESS LIGHTHOUSE— BLUE HILL 39 

wall was a leper's window, a small aperture now closed but 
still traceable. The greater part of the walls was erected by 
Bishop de Burnham, but the belfry dates only from the 
eighteenth century. 

From the summit of the cliffs there is a good view, but 
there is, of course, a much finer prospect from— 

Girdleness Lighthouse, 

which can be entered by the gate on the north-west and is 
open to visitors from n a.m. to i p.m., except on Saturdays 
and Sundays. It was built in 1 833 and is situated off a sunken 
rock known as the Girdle. Its extreme height is 120 feet 
and the summit is reached by 189 steps. There is a double 
flash every twenty seconds, the light being visible 19 miles. 
The visitor who would prefer to vary the return route may 
continue along the road by the shore of Greyhope Bay, until 
he is past the South Breakwater, and then follow the road 
by the battery until he arrives at the ferry a little distance 
short of Torry Harbour Lighthouse. Thence he may pass 
to the eastern extremity of the Esplanade, which will lead 
him to Victoria Bridge ; or he may be carried to the northern 
shore of the Harbour in the vicinity of the North Pier, and 
thence make his way back by the quays to the^centre of the 
city. 

6.— THE BLUE HILL. 

One of the best view-points in the neighbourhood of Aber- 
deen is the Blue Hill, situated south-south-west of the city. 
Paul Blouet (Max O'Rell) wrote of it in his book on Scotland, 
Friend Macdonald, as one of the treasured memories of a 
delightful tour. It may be approached either by way of the 
Bridge of Dee or by the Victoria Bridge. Those who pass 
over the former will go southward rather more than a mile 
and a half from the river to the entrance to the village of 
Charlestown, where there is a cross-road connecting Nigg 
with Auchlunies. This should be followed to the right, and 
Blue Hill will be found on its south side, about three-quarters 
of a mile from the turning. 

If the city be left by Victoria Bridge, the high-road is fol- 
lowed to Nigg Church (the church now in use, not the " old 
kirk "), and there the road to Auchlunies should be taken. 

Near Charlestown is Loch Loirston, which has gradually 



40 BLUE HILL 

been reclaimed, and now comprises only some twenty-seven 



acres. 



Blue Hill rises to the height of 467 feet above sea-level 
The prospect from the summit includes a splendid view of 
the city ; the sea-coast from Dunnottar Castle in the south 
to Buchan Ness in the north, a distance of about fifty miles ; 
and the valley of the Dee with its mountains and hills as 
well as other great heights in the district. The most distant 
mountains seen are Cairn Toul (near the source of the Dee) 
Ben Bhrotain (pronounced Vrottan) (just south of Cairn 
Toul), Ben Avon (at the head of Glen Avon), and Ben-a-Bourd 
(to the south-west of Ben Avon). Lochnagar, Bennachie 
and the Hill of Fare are among the more or less familiar 
eminences included in the prospect. The most distant obi ect 
that can be distinguished towards the south is the Tower of 
Johnson, on Garvock Hill, near Laurencekirk. 

nr 5 some Blue Hill mil be interesting from its connection with the 
Ordnance Trigonometrical Survey. " In 1817 a base line (s miles 
100 feet) was measured by chain on Belhelvie ■ Links-an opera ion 
that took six weeks to perform-and the actual length was ElS 
be only three inches less than the computed length. The latter 
length was founded on a base line measured on Hounslow Heath 
and the computed length of the sides of a triangle farmed by the" 
measured line as a base on Belhelvie Links, and the extremities of 
it, Tarbathie and Leyton, with the Blue Hill." CAliemiues 0I 



PERTH AND THE EASTERN HIGHLANDS, 




WARD. LOCK. & CO.. Ltd.. Warwick House, Salisbury Square, LONDON. 



EXCURSIONS FROM ABERDEEN. 

AMONG the many places of interest easily visited by 
Great North of Scotland Railway from Aberdeen 
are : — 

Speyside. From Dufftown to Boat of Garten (see pp. 98-1 18). 

Deeside. From Drum to Ballater (see pp. 55-88). 

Moray Firth Coast. Banff, Portsoy, Cullen, Buckie, Spey 
Bay, Garmouth, Elgin, Lossiemouth (see pp. 124-150). 

Vale of Alford. Kemnay, Monymusk, Tillyfourie, Alford 
(see pp. 9i-3)- 

Bennachie. Pitcaple and Oyne (see pp. 98-100). 

Donside. Kinaldie, Kintore, Inverurie (see pp. 89-91). 

Buchan. Newmachar, Udny, Ellon, Hatton, Cruden Bay, 
Longhaven, Boddam (see pp. 45-50). 

The places south of Aberdeen to which excursions are 
principally made are Stonehaven and Dunnottar Castle, 
and Laurencekirk, Fettercairn and Edzell — all reached by 
the Caledonian Railway. 

Several of these places may also be reached by Public 
Motors. 

From Aberdeen, too, may be taken the Three Rivers Tour, 
by rail and road, occupying two days and embracing the Dee, 
Don and Spey. 

The G.N.S.R. also offer a Day Tour from Aberdeen to 
Deeside and Donside, thus : Aberdeen to Dinnet or Ballater 
by rail ; thence motor to Strathdon and to Alford ; and rail 
to Aberdeen. Or the route may be reversed. 

Instead of completing this tour in a single day, and the 
Three Rivers Tours in two days, holders of the tickets may 
break their journey at any place on the route. The tickets 
are valid for two months. 

TO STONEHAVEN AND DUNNOTTAR CASTLE. 

By rail, 16 miles; by road, 15 miles. 
Stonehaven lies to the south-west of Aberdeen, and for 
three-fourths of the way the line connecting the two places 
runs close to the coast. 

Soon after leaving the city the traveller has on his left 
41 



42 STONEHAVEN— DUNNOTTAR CASTLE 

Girdleness Lighthouse and the ruins of St. Fittick's, already 
described. Near Portlethen station (8 miles) is the fishing 
village of Findon, or Finnan, famed for its smoked haddocks — 
" Finnan haddies." Muchalls (nj miles) is coming into 
prominence as a health resort, and here may be seen some of 
the finest rock scenery on the north-east coast of Scotland. 
An immense cave in the rocks, formerly a haunt of smugglers, 
is worth inspection. A little distance short of Stonehaven is 
a long, high viaduct, from which the town may be seen to 
great advantage. 

Stonehaven, 

the county town of Kincardine, stands in a narrow valley on 
the rivers Carron and Cowie. It owes its name to a rock 
in the harbour, a natural basin, enlarged and deepened in 
1912, adjacent to the streets forming the " old town," which 
is of early origin. In the new town are a spacious square, 
and wide, regular streets named after members of the Barclay 
family of Urie, one of whom was the founder. 

The pure and bracing air, the bold line of coast, the rock 
caverns, and the extensive beach, affording excellent bathing, 
make the little port an attractive health resort. There is 
a golf course of 1 8 holes beautifully situated on the cliffs, for 
anglers there is both sea and river fishing, while the facilities 
for lawn tennis are probably unsurpassed in the country, 
there being no fewer than sixteen courts. 

About 1 \ miles south-west are the ruins of — 

Dunnottar Castle, 

long the stronghold of the powerful Keiths, Earls Marischal 
of Scotland. It stands on the summit of a cliff washed on 
three sides by the sea, while on the fourth it is almost separ- 
ated from the mainland by a deep chasm, from which the 
ascent is steep and rugged. The ruins cover about three 
acres, and consist of the great square tower, which is almost 
entire, broken towers and turrets, remains of the palace 
and the chapel, long ranges of roofless buildings and broken 
arches, and many dismal halls, vaults and chambers. 

The castle was taken from the English by Wallace in 1296. 
To the church which then stood on the crags some of the 
English soldiers fled for sanctuary, but only to find death'in 
awful forms. 



DUNNOTTAR CASTLE 43 

" Wallace in fire gart set all hastily, 
Burnt up the kirk and all that was therein. 
Attour the rock the lave ran with great din. 
Some hung on crags, right dolefully to dee, 
Some lap, some fell, some fluttered in the sea. 
No Southron in life was left in that hold, 
And them within they burnt to powder cold." 

Forty years later Edward Balliol garrisoned the castle with 
English soldiers, but it was again re-taken. In 1645 it was 
besieged by Montrose. Among those in it were sixteen Cove- 
nanting ministers who urged the Earl Marischal to be firm 
in its defence and to come to no terms with Belial, as they 
styled their foes, assuring him that the smoke of his farm- 
steads and villages burning on the mainland would be " a 
sweet smelling incense in the nostrils of the Lord." Six years 
later the castle was besieged by a Parliamentary force, and 
as starvation threatened to compel surrender, the ancient 
Scottish regalia, which had been sent to it for safety, were in 
danger of being lost. Feminine boldness and ingenuity 
rescued them. Mrs. Granger, wife of the minister of Kinneff, 
having obtained permission to visit the Governor's wife, 
brought the crown away among some wearing apparel, while 
her maid brought away the sceptre and sword of state in a 
bundle of flax on her back. It is said that the blockading 
officer himself helped the lady to mount her horse, and saw 
her ride away without suspicion. 

The last of the cruel memories attached to Dunnottar is 
of the treatment of imprisoned Covenanters in 1685. Con- 
fined in one dungeon in the height of summer were 167 men, 
women and children. Some died, others were killed in at- 
tempting to escape by clambering down the rocks, and some, 
recaptured, died of the tortures inflicted as punishment. In 
the Whigs' Vault, as the dungeon is called, there are still to be 
seen in the walls the holes in which the outspread hands of the 
prisoners were secured by wedges. In this agonizing position 
women as well as men were kept standing for days together. 
The remains of the prisoners released by death were interred 
in the churchyard, where the Covenanters' Stone recording 
their names may still be seen. It was while clearing the 
inscription on this stone that Robert Paterson, the original 
of " Old Mortality," was seen by Sir Walter Scott, who was 
passing the night in the manse. 

George, the last Earl Marischal, having taken part in the 



44 LAURENCEKIRK— FETTERCAIRN 

Rebellion of 1715, was attainted, and Dunnottar, passing 
from his hands, fell to ruin. 

TO LAURENCEKIRK, FETTERCAIRN AND EDZELL. 

This is a combined rail and road excursion. Train is 
taken via Stonehaven to — 

Laurencekirk, 

a town once famous for the manufacture of snuff-boxes. It 
was founded and fostered by Lord Gardenstown, who one 
morning found the following lines in the visitors' book at the 
inn : 

" From sma' beginnings Rome of auld 

Became a great Imperial city ; 
'Twas peopled also, we are tauld, 

By spendthrifts, vagabonds, banditti : 
Quoth Thomas then, the day may come 

When Laurencekirk will equal Rome." 

From Laurencekirk the route is continued by road through 
the cultivated lands of the Howe of the Mearns, interspersed 
with wooded country. In the forefront the Grampians stand 
out in bold relief against the sky, all the way to Fettereairn, a 
distance of 5 miles. Fettereairn is a peaceful village which 
cherishes the memory of a visit of Queen Victoria and the 
Prince Consort, who spent a night in the Ramsay Arms Hotel 
in 1 861 . The furnishings of the rooms they occupied remain 
as at that time, and spanning the high-road is a triumphal 
arch erected to commemorate the visit. Another object of 
interest is an octagonal pillar which is believed to have been 
the market cross of the extinct town of Kincardine. Upon 
the shaft is marked the length of the old Scottish ell. In the 
neighbourhood of Fettereairn is Fenella's Castie, the scene 
of the strange murder of Kenneth III by means of an infernal 
machine invented by Lady Fenella — a brass statue which 
threw out arrows when a golden apple was taken from its 
hand. ' 

From Fettereairn the road runs past Balbegno Castle 
and through beautiful woods to Gannoehy Bridge, where 
many visitors alight to enjoy the view and take the lovely 
walk of a mile or so along the river bank to Edzell. The 
road onward passes through the village Commonty, an ideal 
spot for a picnic. On the right a road goes off to the keep 
and round tower of Edzell Castle, formerly the seat of a 



EDZELL— ELLON 45 

younger branch of the Lindsays, Earls of Crawford, and 
now the property of the Earl of Dalhousie. 

Edzell, 
a small sunny village in the valley of the North Esk, is coming 
into high repute as a health resort, helped largely by the 
exceeding beauty of the surrounding district. It contains 
two hotels, has a fine public hall and library, and a golf course 
of 1 8 holes. 

BY THE BUCHAN LINE. 
ELLON, CRUDEN BAY, AND THE BULLERS OF BUCHAN. 

With the exception of Ellon, these places are on the coast 
to the north of Aberdeen, and by rail are all reached by the 
Buchan Line of the Great North of Scotland Railway- This 
branch leaves the main line at Dyce Junction, six miles from 
Aberdeen. Eight miles from the junction is Udny station. 
The little village (2^ miles) is used as headquarters by anglers, 
who fish the open portions of the Bronie, or Udny Burn, 
the Tarty and the Foveran Bum. 

Visible above the trees on the left as one approaches Udny 
is Udny Castle, rebuilt in the latter half of the nineteenth 
century, in good keeping with the ancient tower. 

About 20 miles from Aberdeen is — 
Ellon. 

Angling. — Permission can be obtained for fishing the Ythan. Its tributary, the 
Ebrie, may be fished from the south bank ; another tributary, the Forvie, 
3 miles distant, is preserved only near Auchmacoy House, and the Tarty, 
which falls into the estuary of the Ythan, is nearly all open. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

This is a very pleasant village on the Ythan, which has a 
course of 31 miles, and is nearly all available for a day's fish- 
ing on application to the proprietors. Besides salmon, sea 
trout, lake trout, brook trout, whitling, a few grilse and pike, 
it contains pearl mussels, and pearl fishing is still carried on 
in it, although to a less extent than formerly. One of the 
largest gems in the ancient crown of Scotland was obtained 
from this stream. 

Fyvie makes a convenient headquarters for the upper 
Ythan, Methlick for the middle reaches, Ellon and Newburgh 
for the lower part. Guests at the Udny Arms, Newburgh, 



46 ELLON— COLLIESTON 

may fish 4 miles of tidal water. The Tarty is also at hand. 
Newburgh is connected with Aberdeen (13 miles) by a ser- 
vice of motor 'buses. 

In the neighbourhood of Ellon are interesting walks and 
drives. About ten minutes' walk from the village is Ellon 
Castle, on the terrace of which is an ivy-clad remnant of the 
original building. A footpath follows the river through very 
pleasant scenery. At the end of about a mile tnere are crags 
on each side of the stream, rising in places to a height of a 
hundred feet, and covered with underwood and wild flowers. 

About six miles to the north-west is Haddo House, in the 
Palladian style of architecture, the principal seat of the 
Marquis of Aberdeen and Temair, who made considerable 
alterations to it in 1880 and erected a private chapel, designed 
by G. E. Street. It stands in a beautiful park, to which 
visitors have free access, but permission to enter the house 
must be obtained of the factor. Occasionally motor chars-a- 
bancs run to it from Aberdeen. The extensive grounds 
contain a granite obelisk to Sir Alexander Gordon, who fell 
at Waterloo, and on a hill is a colossal urn in memory of the 
fourth earl. 

At Ellon is the junction of the Buchan line with — 

THE CRUDEN RAILWAY. 

The first station is Auchmacoy. It is about half a mile 
from the mansion house of that name and is the nearest 
station for — - 

Collieston, 
a quaint and primitive fishing village. The caves and rock 
scenery in the vicinity are the principal attractions. It has 
a small beach sheltered by lofty cliffs, on which some of the 
cottages are perched, while others stand at the water's 
edge, all placed without the slightest semblance of order or 
design. 

The best of the caves is Cave Arthur, a singular underground 
dwelling consisting of a number of chambers. These can 
all be explored, but visitors must be provided with lights. 
The entrance is hidden from the sea by an embankment. 

A little to the south of Cave Arthur is' a creek where the 
Santa Caterina, one of the ships of the Armada, was wrecked 
in 1.588. 

Adjoining Collieston on the south is the sand-blownparish 



CRUDEN BAY 47 

of Forvie. It extends from the village to the north bank 
of the Ythan, a distance of nearly four miles. Not far from 
the centre of the sands are the foundations and portions of 
the walls of a building supposed to have been the parish church. 
The catastrophe is said to have happened in 1688 (legend 
says in fulfilment of a " maiden's malison "), and to have 
been caused by a furious storm that continued for nine days. 

Slains Castle and other points of interest immediately north 
of Collieston are described on pp. 48-50. 

Hatton station, the third from the junction, serves the 
village of Hatton of Cruden, the business and shopping centre 
of a large agricultural district. 

The next station, the principal one on the line, is at — 

CRUDEN BAY. 

Bank. — North of Scotland and Town and County. 
Distances. — -Aberdeen, 30 miles ; Peterhead, 8. 

Golf. — A course of 18 holes, which attracts players from all parts. Conveyance 
from station (i mile) by electric tram. Ladies' course of 9 holes. A 9-hole 
putting green adjacent to the first tee, and an 18-hole putting course close 
to the Cruden Bay Hotel. Visitors staying at Railway Company's Hotel, 
2s. 6d. per day; 15s. per week; 40s. per month; Sundays, 3s. 6d. Other 
visitors, 5s. per day; 20s. per week ; 60s. per month ; Sundays, 5s. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship, with hours of Sunday services — 
Parish Church (ij miles) — n. 
St. James's (Episcopal) (i£ miles) — n and 6. 
Congregational, Main Street, Port Errol — n and 5.30. 
United Free (3J miles) — 11.30 and 5.30. 
Recreation. — Bathing (coaches are provided), golf, angling in the Cruden Burn, 

boating and sea-fishing, tennis, croquet, bowls. 
Pos:, Telegraph and Telephone Office. — -Adjoining the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel. 

Cruden Bay is situated in the very centre of the most 
picturesque part of the Buchan Coast, noted for " its bold 
and precipitous cliffs, its fantastically shaped rocks, and its 
numerous caves." 

The bay itself is fringed with a clean hard sandy beach, 
over two miles in length, admirably adapted for bathing, 
and backed by an extensive stretch of sand dunes on which 
are the Golf Course of eighteen holes and one of nine holes 
for ladies. The full-sized course is nearly 3^ miles long. 
Its greens are a special feature. Visitors are conveyed be- 
tween the station and the Cruden Bay Hotel and the golf 
links by electric tramway. 

The hotel and the station stand on part of the site on which 
was fought the final battle between the Scots and the Danes. 
It took place in 10 12 and resulted in the complete defeat of 
the invaders, who were led by Canute. The relics found 



48 CRUDEN BAY— SLAINS CASTLE 

include a neck chain and a battle-axe that have been deposited 
in the museum at Peterhead. 

On ArdifTery Farm, near the station, is a mound called 
Moat Hill, which is said to have been the seat of justice in 
feudal times. 

To the south of the beach is a long low promontory off 
which is a reef of sunken rocks called the Scaurs, or Skerries, 
running far into the sea. Over them the waves break at 
high water in misty foam, and upon them many a gallant 
ship has been wrecked. About the middle of the bay is a 
lofty headland, called the Hawklaw, from which there is a 
magnificent prospect, the view including many miles of the 
ocean and the coast from Girdleness on the south to Buchan- 
ness Lighthouse on the north. 

Aulton Road, on which are finely situated villas, connects 
the hotel and the links with the village of Port Erroll, which 
lies along the Cruden Burn and has a harbour that can accom- 
modate a large number of fishing boats. Here pleasure boats 
can be hired. 

On a granite headland above Port Erroll is — 

Slains Castle, 

formerly the residence of the Earls of Erroll. Of the situation 
of this mansion no better description can be given than that by 
the late Mr. Ferguson, of Kinmundy : " The castle is almost 
insulated, a strip of sea running round to the north, and 
wending so far west as to leave only a narrow isthmus by 
which to obtain access to the castle. This arm of the sea 
is called the Longhaven, and is quite narrow. It is, in fact, 
a mere rent or fissure on a large scale. It contains deep 
water, and its sides are so perpendicular and so high that, 
in looking up from below, the eye does not perceive a much 
greater breadth of sky than, looking down, it perceives 
breadth of water. Seaward the cliffs are equally high and 
equally precipitous. It is said that from the library or 
drawing-room window a stone dropped falls directly into the 
water. A carriage-way formerly ran round the castle, but 
this has now disappeared, owing to the fall of a large portion 
of rock. Looking from these windows nothing is to be seen 
but the sea and sky." 

The Castle was built in 1836-7 to replace an edifice two 
centuries older. 




1 6 



DUN BUY— BULLERS OF BUCHAN 49 

The scanty remains of a still older Castle of Slains can be 
reached by a walk of about three miles southward from 
Cruden Bay. It was destroyed in 1594 as a punishment of 
the eighth earl for taking part in the rebellion against King 
James VI, who personally visited the spot to see that his 
orders were obeyed. 

Less than a mile from the ruins is the fishing village of 
Collieston (p. 46). 

Near the modern Slains Castle is a remarkable rock known 
as the Twa Een, from the two openings in it. Farther north- 
ward along the coast is the Dun Buy, or Yellow Rock. To 
the natural attractiveness of this is added the interest im- 
parted by Sir Walter Scott, who introduced the rock into 
The Antiquary. "'Are ye mad?' said the mendicant; 
' Francie o' Fowlsheugh, and he was the best craigsman that 
ever speeled a heugh (mair by token, he brak his neck on 
the Dun Buy of Slains), wad na hae ventured upon the 
Halket-head Craigs after sundown.' " 

Not far from the Dun Buy is a cave that on account of 
its peculiar formation has received the name of Hell's Lum 
(lum = chimney). It has two openings. One is to the sea 
and is below high-water mark ; the other is a considerable dis- 
tance inland. The inflow of the waves creates a current of air 
strong enough to expel light articles that are thrown into 
the inland aperture, while an easterly gale drives the water 
into the cave with such force that a continuous column of 
spray is emitted from the upper opening. 

A little farther along the coast (if miles from Port Erroll 
by road, rather more than 2 miles by the cliffs) are — 

The Bullers of Buchan, 
a huge circular cavern open to the sky. It is in a promontory 
on the north side of a narrow creek, at the head of which are a 
few cottages. At the extreme point is a narrow arched open- 
ing. The sides of the cavern are perpendicular walls of rock 
that in places are less than a couple of yards wide. In calm 
weather it is possible for those w-ho have strong nerves to walk 
round the cauldron, but during storms the sea dashes quite 
over the lofty sides, and any human being in its way would 
be swept to destruction. A story is told of a man who, when 
intoxicated, laid a wager that he would gallop round the open- 
ing on horseback. This most perilous feat he accomplished 
in safety, but on becoming sober, and conscious of what he 
had done, he died of fright at the danger in which he had been. 
Aberdeen (d) 



50 BULLERS OF BUCHAN— WHINNYFOLD 

A strong east wind dashes the sea through the natural arch 
with terrific force and sets up within the cave a furious agita- 
tion of the confined water. From its appearance on such 
occasions the name is supposed to be derived — " Bullers " 
being believed to be a corruption of " boilers." In good 
weather and at certain states of the tide, the cave can safely 
be entered by a boat. 

Dr. Johnson in his " Northern Tour " was taken into it. 
He says : 

" We entered the arch which the water had made, and 
found ourselves in a place which, though we could not think 
ourselves in danger, we could scarcely survey without some 
recoil of the mind. The basin in which we floated was nearly 
circular, perhaps thirty yards in diameter. We were enclosed 
by a natural wall, rising steep on every side to a height which 
produced the idea of unsurmountable confinement. The 
interception of all lateral light caused a dismal gloom ; round 
us was perpendicular rock, above us the distant sky, and 
below an unknown profundity of water. If I had any malice 
against a walking spirit, instead of laying him into the Red 
Sea, I would condemn him to reside in the Buller of Buchan." 

In close proximity to the Bullers is a railway platform, 
to and from which the train can be taken. The nearest sta- 
tion is Longhaven, not far from the terminus of the line at 
Boddam. This is a fishing village of which the chief objects 
of interest are the ruins of Boddam Castle and the Buehan- 
ness Lighthouse. Adjoining Boddam is the village of Stirling, 
occupied by workers at the neighbouring quarries. 

Conveyances run between Boddam and Peterhead in connection 
with the principal trains. 

At the opposite end of Cruden Bay, in addition to the 
village of Collieston and the ruins of the old Castle of Slains, 
there are curious caves and the village of Whinny fold. 

The best known of the caverns is the Lion's Cave. It has 
an arched entrance about 20 feet high, and can be thoroughly 
explored at low water. 

Whinnyfold is about 2J miles by road from the Cruden 
Bay Hotel, but less than 2 miles by way of the sands or the 
golf course. Picturesque thatched cottages in a sheltered 
position form the older portion, while -perched on the very 
edge of the cliffs are modern dwellings suitable for summer 
visitors. Whinnyfold is much favoured by picnic parties, 
and " spelding " teas are a specialty. 




A berdeen. 



17 




F. W. Hardie,] 



[Aberdeen. 



PETERHEAD. 




F. W. Hardie,] 



FRASERBURGH. 



[A berdeen. 



ABERDEEN TO PETERHEAD 51 

TO PETERHEAD. 

Route. —By rail direct from Aberdeen or by rail to Boddam, and 
thence by road ; conveyances meet the principal trains ; fare, 6d. 

The railway runs from Aberdeen to Ellon and thence north- 
ward to Maud Junction, where the line again divides, one 
branch passing eastward to Peterhead, the other northward 
to Fraserburgh. (Refreshment room at Maud station.) 
The village at the junction, formerly known as Bank, is now 
called Maud. It is a centre for cattle sales for the Buchan 
district, and is near the Culsh Burn, which is open to anglers. 

The branch to Peterhead passes through Mintlaw station, 
a mile short of which stood, on the right, the Abbey of Deer, 
which became part of the spoil with which the founder of 
Marischal College was enriched. It belonged to the Cister- 
cians, and was founded early in the thirteenth century. 
The early history of the Abbey is told in the MS. Book of 
Deir preserved in the Library of the University of Cambridge. 

The next station is at Longside, where John Skinner, author 
of Tullochgorum, The Ewie wV the Crookit Horn, and other 
favourite Scottish poems, was minister of the Episcopal 
church. The last station before Peterhead is Inverugie, 
of interest from its proximity to the ruined Castle of Inverugie, 
situated about a quarter of a mile above the turnpike road 
bridge on the north bank of the river. The Castle was prob- 
ably erected near the close of the sixteenth century by George, 
Earl Marischal of Scotland, the founder of Marischal College, 
Aberdeen. Next to Dunnottar, it was the principal seat of 
the family, and was probably the birthplace of Frederick the 
Great's famous general referred to on p. 52. It was forfeited 
by the Keiths in consequence of their rebellion in 171 5. 

A little farther up the Ugie, but on the opposite bank of 
the river, are the remains of Ravenscraig Castle, an interesting 
fort dating from the twelfth century. 

Inverugie is distant only 2 miles from — 

Peterhead. 

Angling. — In the Ugie for river trout, sea trout, grilse and salmon. Tickets 
per month — -March, £1 ; April, July, August and September, £1 ios. 
May and June, 15s. ; October, £2 ; Season ticket, £5. 

Baths. — Daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Outside 
and inside swimming ponds of sea water, slipper baths, Turkish, Russian, 
Pine, Sulphaqua and Nauheim baths. The institution is of comparatively 
recent construction and the tariff is very moderate. 

Boating and Sea Fishing. — In the land-locked South Bay. 

Bowls, Croquet and Tennis. 



52 PETERHEAD 

Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Goll. — The Peterhead Links, 9 holes, half a mile from the centre of the town, is 

free to visitors. The Craigewan Course, 18 holes ; one mile from the town. 

June to September inclusive — Gentlemen, is. a da}*, 5s. a week, 12s 6d. a 

month; ladies and juniors, is., 3s 6d., 7s % 6d. Other months — Gentlemen, 

is., 3s. 6d., 10s. ; ladies and juniors, is., zs. 6d., 5s. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 
Library and Museum. — Queen Street, part of a long thoroughfare between the 

station and the Town House. 
Population. — 14,300. 
Post Office. —Marischal Street, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. 

This town is situated on a peninsula projecting into the 
North Sea, and is the most easterly point of Scotland. It is 
44 miles by rail from Aberdeen, but only 33 by road. The 
town is mainly built of red granite obtained from quarries 
near Longhaven station on the Cruden Bay branch railway. 
The principal streets are wide and clean. Three hundred 
years ago Peterhead was famed for the medicinal water from 
its " Wine Wells," and was known as the Tunbridge Wells of 
Scotland. At various periods since it has been esteemed as 
a health and pleasure resort, and in this respect it is once 
again enjoying a growing reputation. Its chief trade is con- 
nected with the herring fishery, Peterhead being one of the 
principal ports in Scotland at which it is conducted. Ship- 
building is carried on and granite is exported. In a bay to 
the south of the town is a great National Harbour of Refuge, 
constructed by convict labour. Near it is the Convict Prison 
for Scotland. 

In the graveyard around the ruins of the old Parish Church 
are some interesting monuments. 

In front of the Town Rouse is a bronze copy of the statue 
which Frederick the Great erected to the memory of Field- 
Marshal Keith. It was presented to the town in 1869 by the 
then King of Prussia. The Field-Marshal was the brother 
of the last Earl Marischal of Scotland, and was banished 
from Britain for taking part in the rebellion in favour of the 
Stuarts. He became one of Frederick's ablest generals, and 
fell at Hochkirch in 1758. 

A prized possession of the town is, a Recreation Park, where 
cricket and football are played, and in which cycle gymkhanas 
and athletic competitions are frequently organized during 
the summer and autumn. 

Some seven miles south of Peterhead are the Bullers of 
Buchan (pp. 49-50). 



FRASERBURGH 53 

TO FRASERBURGH. 

Fraserburgh is the terminus of a branch of the Buchan 
line of the Great North of Scotland Railway. This branch 
leaves Dyce Junction, six miles from Aberdeen, and has 
already been described as far as Maud Junction, thirty-two 
miles from the city. 

A short distance from Maud, and before reaching Brucklay 
station, Brucklay Castle may be seen on the left. It is not 
known when or by whom the original portion was built. A 
lofty central tower was the principal feature, but considerable 
alterations and additions have been made at various times. 

A mile from Brucklay station is the Brnxie, in which brook trout 
are abundant. Written permission to fish it can be obtained from 
Col. Ferguson's factor, Pitfour. 

The next station is at Strichen, the principal village on the 
line, from which public vehicles run to Banff and New Aber- 
dour. 

Close to the village is the Stricken, or North Ugie, open to the 
public for fishing. Fair baskets of trout can be made. 

Beyond Strichen the line winds round Mormond Hill, which 
has the figure of a white horse, made in 1700, on one slope, 
and the figure of a stag, made in 1870, on another. 

Fraserburgh. 

Distance from Aberdeen, 47J miles. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 
Golf. — An 18-hole course. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Fraserburgh was founded in 1570 by Alexander Fraser, 
ancestor of the Saltoun family, whose seat, Philorth House, is 
but two miles south of the town. Its population is increased 
during the fishing season by several thousands of fish workers. 
Fraserburgh has become one of the principal centres of the 
herring fishing industry in Scotland, and for a number of 
years in succession it occupied the premier position. It has 
large and commodious harbours. The number of boats 
engaged is about 450, nearly all of which are steam drifters 
and motor-boats. 

To the east is a bay with a beautiful sandy beach, affording 
good facilities for bathing. 

On Kinnaird Head, to which the town extends from the 
station, are the remains of a Castle, surmounted by a light- 
house. The castle was built by Sir Alexander Fraser in 1570. 



54 FRASERBURGH— PITSLIGO CASTLE 

Near it is the Wine Tower, a building the origin and use of 
which are unknown. It has no outer entrance except on the 
upper storey, but the wooden stair leading up to this is 
modern. The tower is over a cave called Selch's Hole. 

A light railway connects Fraserburgh with St. Combs, 
5 miles south-eastward. There is an intermediate station at 
Cairnbulg, and there are platforms at Kirkton (for the golf 
course) and Philorth Bridge (for Cairnbulg Castle). 

A road running near the coast connects Fraserburgh and 
Macduff, 25 miles westward. It passes through Rosehearty 
(4 miles) and Aberdour (8 miles), but being very hilly and 
having steep gradients is not much used, travellers preferring 
the inland road via Byth, Crudie and Longmanhill. 

At Rosehearty are the ruins of Pitsligo Castle, once the resi- 
dence of Alexander Forbes, Lord Pitsligo, who, after the 
battle of Culloden, lived in the neighbourhood for several 
years as an outlaw. One of his haunts was the Cave of Cows- 
haven, or Lord Pitsligo's Cave, two miles west. Motor 
omnibuses from Rosehearty meet all trains at Fraserburgh. 



DEESIDE. 

BANCHORY— ABOYNE— BALLATER— BALMORAL— BRAEMAR. 

THE frequent residence of Queen Victoria in the region 
contributed not a little to make Deeside a popular and 
fashionable resort. For weeks in the spring and autumn the 
Court Circular was dated from Balmoral, which nestles on the 
banks of the Aberdeenshire Dee, and thus the sparkling river 
and the beautiful valley were brought much before a world 
far removed from both, and became known to those who never 
saw them. King George V and his family have also shown 
their appreciation of their beautiful Scottish home. 

The Dee rises 4060 feet above sea-level on the summit of 
Braeriach, one of the loftiest heights of the Cairngorms, and 
has a winding course of about 87 miles. Sjo little of its 
volume comes through peat-moss that it is everywhere 
remarkably clear. By anglers it is held in high esteem, for it 
is one of the best salmon rivers in the country. The valley 
through which the river flows, and the glens that hold its 
tributaries, exhibit some of the best of Highland scenery, 
and the whole district is blessed with the purest and most 
bracing air in Britain. 

In addition to its natural attractions there is the charm 
derived from its historical associations. " What stories the 
limpid stream could tell, what dramatic events it might relate 
had it a tongue as silvery as its face ! You may jump the 
centuries with all despatch, but you will never find Deeside 
without its stage of history, its endless roll of romance." 

Briefly, the Dee is a river of which the least that can be 
said is that it is one of the most beautiful and interesting 
streams in Scotland, while there are ardent partisans who 
stoutly maintain that it is superior to any other in the country. 

The Deeside Railway closely follows the banks of the river 
for more than three-fourths of the length of the line. Some- 
times it is nearly on a level with the stream ; sometimes 

55 



56 CULTS— CULTER 

high above it ; now it winds through groves of firs and anon 
stretches across moors bare of everything but heather ; some- 
times an ancient castle comes into view ; sometimes a vener- 
able bridge, a waterfall, or rapids. The total length of the 
line is 43^ miles. The first eight of these may be said to lie 
through the suburbs of Aberdeen, for it is not until Culter is 
passed that one gets beyond the villas of the wealthier 
citizens. 

Shortly after starting, Duthie Park and Allenvale Cemetery 
are passed, and a good view is obtained of the old Bridge of 
Dee. 

About 4 miles from the city is the large suburb of Cults, 
overlooking the valley of the Dee, which here also is spanned 
by a bridge, a convenience the inhabitants did not enjoy 
until 1837. But they were then few in number, and a 
" parish boat " served to convey worshippers from this side 
of the stream to their parish church of Banchory-Devenick on 
the opposite bank. On the south side is Biairs College, a 
Roman Catholic institution for the education of young men 
preparing for the priesthood. The college tower, surmounted 
by the Papal tiara, is a prominent object. 

About five and a half miles from the city is Murtle station, 
near which is the Tor-na-Dee Sanatorium. Half a mile 
farther along the line is Milltimber station, and then comes 
the station at the village of Culter, celebrated for its paper 
works, situated just below the bridge that spans the Culter 
Burn. On a high ledge of rock facing the bridge is a coloured 
Statue of Rob Roy, and above the bridge is a picturesque glen 
named after the village. At the junction of the Burn of 
Culter with the Dee stands Peterculter Church (Peterculter 
is the name of the parish), and about a mile south-west are 
the remains of a Roman Camp, locally known as Norman- 
dykes. 

Culter House was once deemed worthy to be described as 
" one of the most beautiful and best-finished gentlemen's 
seats in the North." In front is an avenue called the Lovers' 
Walk, and at the back are the Bride's Ward and the Bride's 
Well. 

We next come to Drum, ten miles from Aberdeen. About 
a mile north-west of the station, and within sight of the rail- 
way, stands Drum Castle, a royal residence in days gone by. 
The oldest portion is a massive tower, with walls 12 feet 
thick, said to have been erected by William the Lion at the 



THE NORTH-EAST OF SCOTLAND 




DRUM— CRATHES 57 

end of the twelfth or beginning of the thirteenth century. 
'• The well in the dungeon, the thickness of the walls, the 
vaulted roofs, the windows few, small, and far from the 
ground, no entrance lower than the first floor, which was only- 
reached by steps originally removable in times of danger, all 
show that it was built for security and defence." It is just 
over 60 feet in height, and contains four vaulted chambers, 
each occupying an entire storey. The main portion of the 
castle is in the Scottish Baronial style, and was built in 161 9, 
a date that appears above the windows. 

A grant of the land and forest of Drum was made by 
Robert the Bruce to William de Irwine, or Irvine, in 1324, 
ten years after the battle of Bannockburn, and the property 
has remained in the possession of the Irvine family ever 
since. 

On approaching Park station, but a mile from Drum, a 
small tower may be seen on a tree-covered knoll. It was 
built by the tenantry of Durris in 1825, to commemorate 
a successful lawsuit that transferred the estate to the last 
Duke of Gordon. 

Next comes — 



Crathes, 

a pleasantly-situated village that is attracting an increasing 
number of summer and autumn visitors. On the slope of a 
wooded hill to the right, about a mile west of the station, 
stands Crathes Castle, the family seat of the Burnetts. It is 
in the midst of beautiful grounds, to which the public are 
occasionally admitted. The older portion of the building 
dates from 1528, and consists of a square tower with turrets. 
To this additions have been made from time to time. " It has 
the usual Flemish characteristics of turrets and dormer win- 
dows, while the lower storeys, for safety's sake, are plain and 
dark." A gap in the woods discloses a very fine view of the 
Castle a short distance beyond Crathes station. 

On the left, about two miles south of Crathes, is Tilquhillie 
Castle, which was built in 1576, and is now a farmhouse. It 
is a very interesting specimen of the semi-fortified smaller 
houses of the gentry of the sixteenth century. 

" Tilquhillie stands on the old, old lands, 
And the name of the Douglas is there." 



58 BANCHORY 

A cadet of Douglas of Dalkeith settled in Tilquliillie about 
I479- 

Banchory. 

Angling. — The Tor-na-Coille Hotel has stretches of the Dee to let for salmon 

and trout fishing. The proprietors and tenants of the lower reaches of the 

Feugh occasionally grant permission to fish for trout. Many bums in the 

neighbourhood provide good sport for yellow trout. 
Banks. — North of Scotland and Town and County, Union Bank of Scotland. 
Distances by road. — Aberdeen, 17! miles ; Ballater, 24 ; Braemar, 40J ; Aboyne, 

12J ; Stonehaven, 16. 
Early Closing. — Thursdays. 
Golf. — An 18-hole course, nearly 3 miles in length, by the banks of the Dee, 

within 5 minutes' walk. Visitors' fees : day, 2s. ; week, 7s. 64. ; fortnight, 

12s. 6d. • month, 25s. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship, with hours of Sunday services — 
Parish Church — 11.30 and 6. 
United Free Church — ir.30 and 6. 
St. Tertian Episcopal — ir.30 and 6. 
Population. — 1,633. 
Post Office, High Street. — Weekdays, 8 to 7 ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. (telegrams 

only). 
Reading' Room and Library. — Town Hall Buildings. 
Recreation Ground, Dee Street. — Bowling green, tennis courts and croquet 

lawn. 

Banchory is one of the prettiest spots on Deeside. It is a 
favourite holiday resort of Aberdonians and its lodging houses 
let readily in the summer months. A considerable share 
of the favour shown to it must be attributed to its climate, 
the site of the town being open towards the south and shel- 
tered from cold blasts from the north by the Hill of Fare 
(1,545 feet). 

The town is modern, although as early as the fourteenth 
century there were a few houses near the Church, which 
stood in the churchyard until 1824, and was then rebuilt 
in its present position. The station is at the eastern end 
of the town, and at the western end is the Town Hall. At the 
western end also is Burnett Park, a public park named in 
honour of its donor, the late Sir Robert Burnett. 

Springs on the hill of Kerloch furnish an ample supply of 
excellent water ; the town is well drained, and the streets 
are well lighted. 

The Dee at Banchory is crossed by a bridge. At the south- 
ern end is the entrance to a modern residence called Blackhall 
Castle. From this point there is no public road westward 
along the south side of the Dee until -near the Bridge of 
Potarch. 

In a beautiful wood, a mile and a half from the town, is a 
large and much appreciated sanatorium for consumptives, 



EXCURSIONS FROM BANCHORY 59 

called Nordrach-on-Dee, charmingly situated between river 
and wood. The whole of the immediate neighbourhood is 
richly wooded. 

EXCURSIONS FROM BANCHORY. 

Within a radius of ten miles there is a large choice of walks 
through varied scenery. One of the first to be taken, and 
to be taken again and again, is to — 

The Bridge of Feugh, J mile from the middle of the town. 
The scenery at the bridge is one of the greatest charms of the 
neighbourhood, and is as fine as any on lower Deeside. There 
is nothing remarkable in the bridge itself, which is but a plain, 
three-arched structure a short distance from the confluence 
of the Feugh with the Dee. But above and below the bridge 
the water tumbles and rushes among huge rocks, and in 
summer and autumn the attempts of the ascending fish to 
leap the cascades form an attraction that never stales. The 
Feugh has a course of about twenty miles. 

By the Left Bank of the Feugh, through the village of 
Straehan, 3J miles south-west of Banchory, to Whitestone, 
six miles, once a great halting-place for drovers. Above 
Whitestone the river is practically all open to anglers. 

Along the North Side of the Dee and across the " shooting 
greens " to Whitestone, and return by the Bridge of Feugh. 
This is one of the best and most popular walks. Total 
distance is about 15 miles. 

Along the South Side of the Dee. In places the road is very- 
like that from Braemar to Old Mar Lodge. The best plan is 
to take train to Crathes station (10 minutes) and walk back. 

Hill Climbing. 

For visitors who can enjoy hill-climbing there are several 
heights. They include — 

Scoltie, crowned by a tower erected in memory of General 
Burnett of Banchory ; two miles to the summit. 

Tilquhillie, a mile from Eslie farmhouse ; two miles to the 
summit from Banchory. 

Kerloch (1,747 feet), 4% miles to the summit, from which 
may be seen the Bass Rock, St. Abb's Head and the Pent- 
lands. 

The Hill of Fare (1,545 feet), some five miles to the north. 

Clachnaben (1,900 feet) is situated between the Aven 
or A'an and the Dye, tributaries of the Feugh. It may be 
approached from the Bridge of Dye, eight miles from the 
Bridge of Feugh, or from the Feughside Inn (Whitestone), 



60 TORPHINS— KINCARDINE O'NEIL 

5 J miles from the Bridge of Feugh. The latter is the route 
usually followed. Clachnaben signifies " stone of the moun- 
tain." The stone to which the name refers is a great project- 
ing rock that has been exposed by the wearing away of the 
softer material around. According to tradition, however, 
embodied in a poem by the minister of Birse (near Aboyne) in 
the latter part of the eighteenth century, the stone originally 
lay " low in a plain " whence it was taken by the Devil to 
be hurled at his dame, who has since lain entombed beneath 
it. 

On leaving Banchory the railway line diverges from the 
river, sweeping in a northerly direction by Glassel and Tor- 
phins to Lumphanan, where it turns to the south again, and, 
meeting the river at Aboyne, keeps company with it to the 
terminus at Ballater. 

A short distance to the right of Glassel station is Glassel 
House, by the side of the Burn of Canny. Between the 
stations of Glassel and Torphins, two and a half miles apart, 
the line runs through a level tract of meadow land alongside 
the Burn of Beltic, which is only the Burn of Canny under 
another name. This streamlet drains an extensive area, and 
was subject to such violent and frequent floods that it was 
necessary to incur much expense in protecting the low-lying 
lands. 

Torphins is a rising village that has come into favour as a 
summer resort for Aberdeen people. Its station is generally 
used by visitors coming from the east to the village of Kin- 
cardine O'Neil, which is situated about three miles to the 
south-west amidst very pleasant scenery. Life here now is 
in striking contrast to what it was in olden days. Formerly 
it was a very busy place. All the traffic on the north side of 
the Dee passed through it, and it was a halting-place for 
drovers on their way to the south. But now Kincardine is 
very quiet and quite retired from the bustle and turmoil of 
the trading world. The road between Torphins station and 
Kincardine O'Neil runs within a quarter of a mile of the ruins 
of Maud Castle, of which there is no authentic record extant. 
North-east of Torphins is Craigmyle, the seat of Lord Shaw 
of Dunfermline. 

For some distance beyond Torphins the line continues 
parallel to the Beltie Burn, and then crosses it at a spot 
where the water flows in a deep hollow, popularly known as 
Satan's Den. 



LUMPHANAN— PEEL BOG 61 

Lumphanan, a pretty village, 27 miles from Aberdeen, has 
been called into existence by the railway. It is picturesquely 
situated on a tree-clad slope, and is interesting on account 
of its possession of the Peel Bog, and because the death of 
Macbeth took place within the bounds of the parish, and not 
as related by Shakespeare. 

Wyntoun's Chronicle gives a detailed account of the tragic 
event. It tells how — 

" Over the Mounth J they chased him then, 
Intil the woods of Lumphanan. 

Thus Macbeth slew they then, 
Intil the woods of Lumphanan." 

Near the church, which is about half a mile south-west of 
the station, is a spring called Macbeth's Well, and a quarter 
of a mile to the south of that is the farm of Cairnbathie, where, 
tradition says, the fugitive king was wounded, the actual spot 
being marked by Macbeth's Stone. His enemies finally 
closed with him on Perkhill, and, having killed him, cut off 
his head, which they carried to Malcolm Canmore, who had 
remained at Kincardine O'Xeil. The body is said to have 
been buried under a cairn set up on the spot where he fell, 
which is about a mile from Cairnbathie. The stones having 
been utilized in the erection of farm buildings, the site was 
subsequently planted and enclosed. 

The Peel Bog, or Peel Ring, is a circular earthen mound sur- 
rounded by a moat and a dyke. The mound is about fifteen 
feet high and forty yards in diameter. The works were 
probably constructed in the twelfth or thirteenth century, 
and it is believed that the mound was originally surmounted 
by a wooden fort. 

From Lumphanan the fine goes southward to Dess {see 
p. 63), a small station 29 £ miles from Aberdeen, and the 
nearest to Kincardine O'Neil, being only two miles from it. 
Just beyond the station the line runs by the side of the Loch 
of Aboyne, and a glimpse may be had of the turrets of Aboyne 
Castle, situated towards the north-west and not visible from 
any other point on the railway. 



1 The range of hills forming the watershed on the right bank of 
the Dee was anciently called " The Mounth." 



62 ABOYNE 

Aboyne. 

Angling. — Six miles of the Dee are rented by the Huntly Arms Hotel. Boats 
are let to boarders at the hotel. During July and August visitors may 
obtain permission to fish the hotel water free of charge. 

Bank. — North of Scotland and Town and Comity. 

Distances. — -Aberdeen, 32J miles ; Ballater, 11J ; Balmoral, 19J ; Braemar, 28. 

Early Closing. — Thursdays. 

Golf. — An iS-hole course 3 miles long, 5 minutes from the village. Visitors' 
fees : day, August and September, 2s. 6d. ; October-July, 2s. ; week, 
7s. 6d. ; fortnight, 12s. 6d. ; month, 25s. ; two months, £2 2s. ; season, £2 10s. 

Hotel. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Parish Church, United Free Church, Episcopal and Roman 
Catholic. 

Post Office. — Opposite the Green. Week-days, 8 to 8 ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. 

Reading Room and Library. — In the Public Hall. 

Tennis Courts. — Day, is. 6d. ; season, 21s. 

Aboyne is a neat Highland village fringed by woods and 
hills. It is about four hundred feet above sea-level, and lies 
chiefly on the north side of the Dee, which is crossed at the 
south-west end of the village by a fine Suspension Bridge. 
The climate is bracing, and there is an excellent water supply. 
A conspicuous feature of the place is the large village Green, 
of triangular shape. It is used as the market stance and 
as a public recreation ground, and upon it are held the Aboyne 
Highland Games, the sporting event of the summer season. 
On the south side of the green is the Public Hall, containing 
library, reading-room and billiard-room. At the top of the ' 
green is the Parish Church, dating only from 1862. The 
United Free Church is on the east side of the village and is 
distinguished by its spire and clock. 

The village is properly Charlestown of Aboyne, having 
been called Charlestown in honour of the first Earl of Aboyne. 
Aboyne chiefly consists of villas and terraces to the west and 
north-west of the railway station, and is deservedly a favourite 
resort of summer visitors. 

A few yards from the station and the hotel is the chief 
entrance to the grounds of — 

Aboyne Castle, 

the residence of the Marquis of Huntly. It is a large and 
massive structure of different dates, and is said to have been 
once a royal residence. The centre and the right wing were 
rebuilt a few years ago. The garden is some little distance 
from the Castle, and is approached by a private avenue and 
grassy path. 

Near one of the bridges spanning a burn in front of the 



ABOYNE 63 

Castle is an ancient boat that was recovered from the bed of a 
lake, and on a knoll in an oak plantation is a sculptured 
stone, shaped like a coffin, and six and a half feet in height. 

It formerly stood near the Loch of Kinord, and probably 
served as a market cross for an annual fair held there. During 
the fervour of the Reformation period the stone was thrown 
into the loch, possibly because there was a cross upon it. 
After many years it was recovered and set up on the shore. 
There it remained until it was carried off by a Donside laird, 
whose possession, however, was of brief duration, for the 
Earl of Aboyne, hearing of its removal, caused the stone to be 
returned and erected upon its present site. 

The Castle was one of those surrendered to the English 
King Edward in 12 91, and it was then garrisoned by an 
English force. After various vicissitudes it came into the 
possession of the Gordons before the close of the fourteenth 
century. 

The Hill of Mortlich (1,248 feet) was formerly surmounted 
by a monument to the 10th Marquis of Huntly, who died in 
1 863, but the monument collapsed a few years ago. 

Between the village and the hill is the Loch of Aboyne, 
an artificial sheet of water having an area of about 32 acres. 
Its surface is broken by several picturesque wooded islets. 
It is noted for the curling contests that take place upon it. 

EXCURSIONS FROM ABOYNE. 

Through the Fungle Glen. This is a particularly delightful 
walk. The glen skirts the Auld-dinnie Burn, which enters 
the Dee a short distance west of the Suspension Bridge. To 
reach it, cross the bridge, turn to the right, and then take the 
first road on the left. From a resting-place constructed by 
the late Sir William Cunliffe Brooks there is a magnificent 
view. 

To Kincardine O'Neil and the Bridge of Potarch. This is 
a lovely drive. The village, already described, is between 
four and five miles eastward of Aboyne. 

A mile and a half short of the village the road crosses the 
Dess Burn. A little to the north of the bridge is a waterfall 
called the Slog of Dess. It is picturesque but small, being 
only 15 feet in height. Eastward of the bridge, near the 
27th milestone from Aberdeen, and on the north side of the 
road, stands Desswood House, which is said to command 
"' perhaps the most extensive and varied view of mountain, 
wood and water, which is to be seen from any place on the 



64 GLEN TANNER 

banks of the Dee." On the opposite side of the river, in 
another excellent position, is Carlogie House. 

But the most interesting feature of the district is in the 
vicinity of Potarch Bridge, spanning the Dee just over six 
miles from Aboyne. Sixty or seventy yards above the bridge 
the river flows through a rocky channel, which at one point is 
only 15 feet wide. This spot is known as Caird Young's Loup, 
or Leap, from the fact that a tinker named Young, who had 
killed a gipsy chief, leaped across it in his attempt to escape 
the consequences of his crime. 

To Glen Tanner (sometimes modernized as Tanar), a highly 
picturesque glen running towards the south-west from the 
vicinity of Aboyne Suspension Bridge. Above the mansion 
(now the property of Lord Glentanar) several lovely lakes 
formed for salmon culture considerably enhance the natural 
beauties of the locality. 

The Water of Tanner is a considerable tributary of the Dee, 
and has a course of some 12 miles. The confluence of the 
streams is about a mile south-west of Aboyne. The Glen 
is reached by following to the west the road that is struck 
after crossing Aboyne Suspension Bridge. This leads over 
the Auld-dinnie Burn, and, at the end of rather less than two 
miles, to the Bridge of Ess, spanning the Tanner. Here the 
bed of the stream is rocky, the banks are lined with trees, 
while the bridge is guarded by a square tower covered with 
ivy. Southward is the heather-clad Red Craig of Craigen- 
dinnie. Following the road along the west side of the water 
for nearly two miles, the pedestrian comes to the Bridge of 
Tanner, a narrow, high-centred structure erected by that 
great road and bridge-maker in the Scottish Highlands — 
General Wade. Here comes into view the mansion, the 
greater part of a mile higher up the stream, and beyond that 
the road is private. 

On the opposite bank stands an Episcopal Church, one of 
the many buildings reared by Sir William Cunliffe Brooks, the 
former owner of Glen Tanner. It occupies the site of the 
mansion house of Braeline, which had fallen into ruin. An 
ornamental archway which had formed part of a ruined for- 
tification, the materials of which had been used by the 
builders of the old house, has been re-inserted in the church. 

In days gone by the Glen was .celebrated for its firs, and 
pine woods still adorn the hillsides. It was also notorious 
for smugglers, there being frequently as many as fourteen 
illicit distilleries at work. 

Mount Keen. This stands at the head of the deer forest of 
Glen Tanner. It has an elevation of 3,077 feet, and there is 
no peak to the east of it so high. The ascent is a good moun- 
tain excursion from Aboyne, from which the topmost point, 



MOUNT KEEN— LOCH KINORD 65 

a well-defined cone, is distant about a dozen miles. The 
Tanner is followed to the site of the old farm-steading of 
Coirebhruach, at the point where the stream is crossed by the 
Fir Mounth path, and thence a track leads almost to the 
summit. Queen Victoria crossed it in 1861 in her " Second 
Great Expedition," and thus described it : " Mount Keen 
was in great beauty before us, and as we came down to Coire- 
bhruach and looked down Glen Tanner, the scenery was grand 
and wild. Mount Keen is a curious, conical-shaped hill, with 
a deep corrie (corrach) in it." 

Westward of Aboyne the line runs through a flat heathy 
tract called the Muir of Dinnet, on which, at a distance of 
four and a half miles from Aboyne, is Dinnet station, which 
is frequently used as a starting-point for the ascent of Morven 
(see p. 70), away in the north-west behind Culblean Hill. 

About two miles west of the station is Loch Kinord, and 
almost as far again is Loch Davan, or Dawain. The former 
is the larger, having an area of 225 acres. 

On Loch Kinord (or Ceander, as it is sometimes called) are 
several islets, some of which have certainly been artificially 
formed. It is said that King Malcolm Canmore had a castle 
on the westernmost island, and that the easternmost was the 
site of a prison. It is also said that the islands are joined to 
the mainland by a causeway that has become submerged 
through the water of the loch having risen since the road 
was constructed. 

Loch Davan, or Dawain, is a pretty sheet of water fringed 
with woods. It contains a small, round, green island tufted 
with trees, and a smaller island bare of vegetation, and pro- 
duces aquatic plants in great abundance. 

Both lochs, as well as the surrounding district, have yielded 
interesting relics of long past days, among the antiquarian 
treasures being articles of stone, bronze, and iron, several 
canoes, and the piles on which stood crannogs, or lake dwell- 
ings. 

Flowing into the west side of Loch Kinord is the Burn of 
the Vat, so named from a kind of cave in its course formed by 
rocks whose position suggested the name. At the spot, 
which is about £ mile from the lake, the rocks are about 60 
feet high on one side but are lower on the other, while the 
passage between is almost blocked by a mass of rock, so that 
the water is held back in times of flood, and by its swirl has 
formed a cavity in the lower part of the rock on either side. 
.The Vat is sometimes called Rob Roy's Cave, but this is an 
erroneous designation. 

Aberdeen (e) 



66 CAMBUS O'MAY— BALLATER 

Dinnet is generally regarded as marking the eastern bound- 
ary of the Deeside Highlands. Two and a half miles beyond 
it is the station of Cambus O'May, perhaps the most pic- 
turesque on the line. It stands amid birch trees and heather 
on the side of a hill, while on the south side of the line the 
river is but a few feet distant. Immediately above the station 
are granite quarries. The stone is of a fine pinkish red, and 
can be obtained in blocks of great size. At this pretty spot 
there is in view some glorious mountain scenery. Westward 
the prospect includes Lochnagar, the Coyles of Muick, Craigen- 
darroch, and other less familiar heights. 

On the south side of the river, and less than two miles in a 
straight line from the station, is Ballaterach, where Lord 
Byron lived for a time when a boy. The place is just off the 
high road that runs between Ballater and Aboyne, and from 
Cambus O'May is reached by a wire suspension footbridge. 
Byron was taken to Ballaterach when recovering from a 
fever, and made his home with the household of a family 
named Robertson. The second daughter was the Mary of 
whom he sings in the beautiful poem, " When I roved a young 
Highlander." She was buried in the churchyard of the 
ruined church of Glen Tanner, her tombstone recording that 
she died in Aberdeen, March 2, 1867, aged 85 years. 

From Cambus O'May the line runs through the plain of 
Ballater, and, in about a mile, passes on the left a birch- 
covered knoll surmounted by a lofty, slender, granite obelisk 
in memory of one of the Farquharsons of Monaltrie, who 
died in 1828. Monaltrie House is beautifully situated at 
the foot of Craigendarroch and the entrance to the Pass of 
Ballater. 

Four miles from Cambus O'May and 43J from Aberdeen 
the line terminates at' — 



Ballater. 

Angling. — Unlimited trout fishing. 

Banks.— North of Scotland and Town and County, Union Bank of Scotland. 

Distances. — By road : Banchory, 24 miles ; Aberdeen, 42 ; Balmoral, 8 ; 
Braemar, 16J. 

Golf. — The course is one of 18 holes, quite near the town. It " combines land 
both arable and heath, with enough but not top much of bank and bunker 
hillock, whin and shingle." There is a handsome pavilion. Visitors' 
fees : day, 2s. ; week, 7s. 6d. ; fortnight, 10s. ; month, 15s. ; season 
(single or family), terms on application. • 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 



BALLATER 67 

Places of Worship,' with hours of Sunday services — 

Established Church — n and 6. 

United Free — n and 6. 

Episcopal — ii, 3 and 6. 

Roman Catholic — n and 6. 
Post and Telegraph Office. — Opposite the station. Week-days, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; 

Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. 
Recreation. — Bowling green and tennis courts, golf, angling, etc. 

Ballater, "the gateway of the Highlands of Deeside," is 
beautifully situated on the north side of the Dee, on a small 
plain closely confined by mountains. It is 660 feet above 
sea-level, an elevation that gives it the advantage of fine 
bracing, healthy air. It is well drained, and is supplied with 
an abundance of good water. It is in the centre of a district 
in which a large number of excursions can be made, and, as 
the result of its many attractions, is yearly increasing in 
favour as a holiday resort. 

The streets are clean and wide ; there are fine business 
premises and many attractive villas built for the accommo- 
dation of visitors. 

Opposite the railway station is a large and imposing block 
of public buildings given to Ballater by the late Mr. Alex- 
ander Gordon, a wealthy brewer of London, a native of Glen- 
muick. The central portion, known as the Gordon Institute, 
contains reading rooms, a public library, and a billiard room. 
Other portions of the block comprise the Post Office, the Albert 
Memorial Hall and the Victoria Hall, both let for public meet- 
ings, concerts, dances, etc. 

At Ballater the Dee is crossed by a handsome granite 
bridge that was opened by Queen Victoria in 1885. Some 
2\ miles west, at Polquhollick, or Pollholliach, the river is 
spanned by a wire suspension bridge for foot passengers. 
A round of the two bridges makes a delightful walk. 

EXCURSIONS FROM BALLATER. 

Brakes and other vehicles run daily to various places of 
interest. 

A motor-car runs to and from Ballater on the Three Rivers 
Tours and the circular tour embracing Strathdon, Alford 
and Aberdeen. 

There is a motor omnibus service from and to Ballater, 
Abergeldie, Crathie, Balmoral and Braemar, in connection with 
the principal trains. 

Round the Pass of Ballater, a deep, narrow gorge between 
Craigendarroch and Creag-ant-Seabhaig. From near St. 
Saviour's Church there is a right of way to Monaltrie Gardens, 



68 EXCURSIONS FROM BALLATER 

thence along the Pass to the Foot of Gairn. The return may 
be made by the abandoned track of a proposed railway to 
Braemar or by Darroch Brae. 

Ascent of Craigendarroch, a huge granite mound clad with 
pine, oak, birch, and aspen, rising on the north-west of the 
town. The summit is thirty to forty-five minutes' walk from 
the station, and is 1,250 feet above sea-level, but not half that 
height above Ballater. It affords a grand view of the valley 
of the Dee, Glen Gairn, and Glen Muick. At the foot is 
Monaltrie House, and on the western side is Craigendarroch 
Lodge. 

The easiest ascent is by the Braemar road to the middle of 
Darroch Brae. The descent may be made by a path to the 
east round the south-east shoulder of the hill below the cliffs, 
and coming out near the United Free Church. 

Ascent of Craig-Cailleach, a wooded height on the south 
side of the Dee, immediately beyond the bridge. It was 
opened up to the public by the late Sir Allan Mackenzie, Bart., 
of Glenmuick, who did much to improve the amenities of the 
neighbourhood of Ballater. He made a road to the hill, and 
caused seats to be placed here and there upon it for the con- 
venience of visitors. By some the view from the top is 
considered superior to the prospect from Craigendarroch. 

It is approached through a gateway at the south end of 
Ballater Bridge. Go first to the left, then to the right. Turn 
up the hill by the well-beaten track at the first seat. Keep 
the path to the summit and return by the same. 

To Pannanich Wells, a small watering-place with an hotel, 
on the high-road on the south of the Dee, about midway 
between Ballater and Cambus O'May. The former really 
owes its existence to the wells, as these became so favoured 
a resort by persons in search of health that greatly increased 
accommodation was called for and houses were erected on 
the site of Ballater. The wells are not now so high in favour 
as they were, but the hamlet is still a very pleasant retreat. 

The Linn of Muick is a fine perpendicular cascade about 
six miles from Ballater, in the midst of delightful scenery. 
The stream that gives its name to the Glen and also to the 
Linn is one of the principal tributaries of the Dee, and enters 
the main stream on the right bank, about half a mile above 
Ballater Bridge. 

Having got to the south side of the Dee, the visitor should 
follow the south road for a short distance to the Bridge of 
Muick, which must be left on the right, and the road followed 
along the eastern side of the Glen. There is a carriage-road 
on each side, but the greater part of that on the west is private. 
Proceeding along the eastern side of the Glen, one soon passes, 
on the left, a small Episcopal Church and then Glenmuick 




A berdeen. 



GLEN GAIRN 69 

House, which occupies a commanding position, and is in the 
Tudor style of architecture. A little farther along the Glen 
stands Birkhall, on the opposite side of the stream. A short 
distance beyond this the road begins to run less near the 
river, but gets quite close to it at the falls. 

Glen Gairn affords delightful walks and drives. The Gairn 
is the largest feeder of the Dee, into which it comes from the 
summit of Ben Avon by a course that is 20 miles in length. 
The main stream receives this affluent about a quarter of a 
mile below the Bridge of Gairn, a fine single-arched structure 
that carries the north road, and is about a mile and a half 
from Ballater. Just below it are the remains of the old 
parish church of Glengairn, and not far above it are lead mines 
that cannot be made to pay. Some half a mile to the north, 
east of the bridge is a small knoll on which are the ruins of 
Gairn Castle, once a hunting-seat of the Forbes family. 

There is a road on each side of the Glen, but the western is 
the more important. It is connected with the north road a 
short distance to the west of the bridge. In two miles it 
passes the mouth of Glen Finzie, on the opposite bank of the 
stream, and about a mile and a half farther it passes Dalfad, 
the site of an old burial-ground and the remains of a Roman 
Catholic Church. These are on the same side as Glen 
Finzie. In another mile and a half — five miles in all from 
the bridge — is Gaimshiel Lodge, on the river side. Here the 
stream is crossed by a bridge, and just below that, on the 
left bank, is Glengairn Church. A long mile farther the road 
forks, the left-hand branch winding round Geallaig Hill (2,439 
feet) to Balmoral, about six miles from the lodge, while the 
right-hand branch, after crossing the Coulachan Bam, returns 
to the Gairn, and continues along its right bank to Daldownie, 
where another road comes in from Balmoral. There it 
crosses first the Duchrie Burn and then the Gairn. It keeps 
close to the left bank of the latter past Corndavon Lodge, a 
shooting-box on a slope of Brown Cow Hill, io£ miles from 
Gairn Bridge, and nearly three miles farther reaches Loch 
Builg, at the southern end of which is a cottage, occupied only 
during the shooting season, and notable as the remotest 
dwelling in the Glen. 

By the east road one passes Candacraig on the right, a 
couple of miles from the Bridge of Gairn. It stands on the 
Lary Burn, and was formerly the site of a Roman Catholic 
Chapel. The burn must be crossed, and about half a mile 
beyond the road divides, the right-hand branch going to 
Morven Lodge, about two miles to the north, on the western 
slope of the mountain after which it is named, while the road 
on the left almost at once enters Glen Finzie. By crossing 
the Finzie as soon as it is reached, and then following the road 



70 MORVEN— BRIDGE OF TULLICH 

westward, Dalfad will be reached at the end of about a mile 
from the stream. There the Gairn can be crossed {see above), 
and the return to Ballater made by the western road. 

The Ascent of Morven (2,862 feet). The summit can be 
most easily reached by driving to Lary by the Gairnside road, 
but those who make the ascent usually walk all the way. 
The pedestrian route from Ballater is by a right of way starting 
near St. Saviour's Church, passing Monaltrie stables and 
running along the Pass road to the first gate on the left. 
Thence the route is along the hill path round the east slopes 
of Scarbuie Hill, and then the slope above the Tullich Burn 
direct to Morven. 

The return may be made by Tomnakiest road, a little 
farther east ; by Glenbardie to Gairnside on the west ; or 
by the gamekeeper's lodge to Lary and thence by the Gairn- 
side road. The total distance up and down is about six miles. 

Morven consists of horn-blende rock. The lower portion 
is thickly covered with juniper. There is a remarkable 
absence of heather, the mountain for the most part having a 
smooth, grassy surface. 

Queen Victoria ascended it in 1 859, and in her Leaves said : 
" The view is more magnificent than can be described, so 
large, and yet so near everything seemed, and such seas of 
mountains with blue lights, and the colour so wonderfully 
beautiful." In the " seas of mountains " the most noticeable 
are Lochnagar to the south-west ; Mount Keen, almost due 
south ; Bennachie in the north-east, and the Eastern Cairn- 
gorms away in the west. 

Byron sings of the time when he — 

" roved a young Highlander o'er the dark heath, 

And climbed thy steep summit, O Morven of snow ! 
To gaze on the torrent that thundered beneath, 

Or the mist of the tempest that gathered below." 

The Bridge of Tullich is one of the most charming view- 
points in the whole of Deeside. It is on the north road, two 
miles north-east of Ballater. Before the eyes of the spectator 
stationed there, and looking westward, " Hills rise above 
hills, with Lochnagar crowning them all. Craigendarroch 
occupies the foreground, with Monaltrie at its base. On the 
right is the narrow gorge called the Pass of Ballater, to the 
left the valley of the Dee, along which the new road winds 
round the Craig, meeting the road through the pass at Gairn 
on the other side. The opening to the left, in the throat of 
which lies the village of Ballater, is Glen Muick, and, shadow- 
ing it in the far distance, rise the mural-like precipices of 
dark Lochnagar. On a summer evening before sunset this 
view is surpassingly beautiful." 



LOCHNAGAR— CLOVA— KIRRIEMUIR 71 

Those who return by way of the Pass of Ballater will regain 
the north road rather more than a mile on the western side 
of Ballater. The road through the Pass is about two miles 
in length. 

The Ascent of Lochnagar (3,786 feet). For miles around 
" the magnificent mountain mass of Lochnagar is the domi- 
nant feature of the scenery. It may not be the. king of 
Scottish mountains, but it is the mountain monarch of Dee- 
side ; there are higher mountains, but mere height does not 
of itself constitute supremacy. Its surrounding lower emi- 
nences cluster around it in a succession of beautiful green 
ranges, and help to ' compose ' its broad and picturesque 
mass." 

The mountain takes its name from a small lake beneath 
its northern precipice, called Lochnagar, or the Goat's Lake. 
The ascent is usually made from Braemar, but it can also 
be conveniently made from Ballater, and, at certain times, 
from Balmoral. The summit is 16 miles from Ballater, 9 
of them being over a carriage-road, which ends at a shooting 
lodge, called " The Hut." This carriage-road is along Glen 
Muick [see also pp. 68-9). " When you emerge from the wood 
at the cascade you enter the upper glen, bare, and scarcely 
showing any traces of habitation." " The Hut " is on the 
western side of the Glen, and the road to it crosses a stream 
some two miles above the falls. The public path to Loch- 
nagar turns off to the right short of the stream. 

Except for a short distance, at a point known as " the 
Ladder," the climb is not difficult, while the view from the 
top of the Ladder is indescribably grand. 
Guides can always be obtained at Ballater. 
To Clova (19 miles) and Kirriemuir (34 miles). The route 
at first lies along Glen Muick to Loch Muick, nine miles from 
Ballater, and this portion is practicable for carriages. From 
the loch there is a well-defined path, the course of which may 
be followed by the eye for miles over the moor, as the route 
is indicated by poles about a quarter of a mile apart. There 
must be no wandering from the track, as there are swamps 
on either side. The route leads over Mount Capel to the head 
of Glen Clova, where a path will be seen running off on the 
right to Braemar. The glen must be descended to the village 
of Clova, where there is a comfortable inn. A carriage-road 
connects Clova with Kirriemuir (" Thrums," the birthplace 
of Sir J. M. Barrie). A coach runs between them daily. 
There is a branch line between Kirriemuir and Forfar Junc- 
tion, eight miles distant. 

To Tarfside (18 miles) ; Edzell (30 miles) ; and Brechin (36 
miles). The route lies through beautiful and varied scenery. 
There is a carriage-road for about 17 miles, and for six of 



72 TARFSIDE— GLEN FINZIE 

these there is also a railway. For the rest of the way there 
is only a bridle track. 

From the south side of Ballater Bridge follow the road to 
the right for three-quarters of a mile, and there, opposite 
Muick Bridge, turn to the left, and follow the road up the hill. 
The road, in time, is succeeded by a track that attains a height 
of i, 800 feet, and then descends to the Water of Tanner. 
Thence the " Mounth Road," which runs almost due south, 
is followed. It ascends from the stream and crosses the ridge 
2,500 feet above sea-level. At this point the summit of Mount 
Keen is half a mile away on the left. The descent is, in the 
words of Queen Victoria, " by a very steep, but winding path, 
called the Ladder, very grand and wild," and leads into Glen 
Mark, where there is the Queen's Well, so called because the 
superstructure was erected in honour of Queen Victoria's 
visit in 1861. A mile or so beyond the well is Loch Lee, and 
thence there is a carriage-road for the remainder of the route. 
At Tarfside, four miles beyond Loch Lee, light refreshments 
can be obtained at the post office. There is no inn or hotel 
between Ballater and Edzell. 

To Tomintoul, 25^ miles via Loch Builg (14^ miles), or 
23 miles via Cock Bridge (13 miles). The longer route as 
far as Loch Builg is described in the Glengairn Excursion. 
Beyond that it is identical with the route from Braemar (see 
pp. 85-6). 

The alternative route is along a rough, hilly carriage-road. 
At first it lies through Glen Finzie, approached by Glen Gairn. 
From the Glen the road continues in the same direction until 
it is within some four miles of Cock Bridge. There it forks. 
The left-hand branch must be followed. In about a mile it 
divides, and again the traveller must keep to the left. Shortly 
the Don will be close at hand on the right, and road and river 
run parallel for more than a mile. Not long after they part 
company the main road will be struck. This must be followed 
towards the left, and the bridge and the inn will be reached 
in less than a mile. From the bridge there is a considerable 
rise. The route lies along the Lecht Road. A mile or so 
from the bridge a branch on the right must be avoided. Be- 
tween four and five miles from the bridge the Conglass Water 
is reached, and the road, making a great bend, follows the 
stream to Tomintoul, the highest village in Great Britain. 

Ballater to Balmoral. 

Balmoral is some eight miles from Ballater, and is therefore 
nearly equidistant between the western terminus of the Dee- 
side railway and Braemar. It can be reached by either bank 
of the river, but the road along the north side is shorter and 



BALLATER TO BALMORAL 73 

better, and is that on which the motor-cars and coaches run. 
The view along the south side is frequently restricted by hills 
and woods, but at the same time the route is highly pic- 
turesque, and the circular drive from Ballater, up the north 
side and down the south side, is very popular. The north 
road is generally considered one of the most picturesque and 
charming in the Kingdom. The sparkling waters of the Dee 
are in sight all the way, and as the road ascends there come 
into view the lofty hill ranges that enclose the valley through 
which the road passes. As one proceeds signs of cultivation 
become less frequent, and the scenery increases in wildness, 
although the lower hills are generally clothed with woods, 
mostly of Scottish fir, birch, and larch. For the greater part 
of the way dark Lochnagar forces itself upon the view. 

The North Road 

begins by winding round Craigendarroch, and leaves that 
height on the right. On the left, as the town is quitted, is the 
United Free Church, and presently there may be obtained, 
through the trees, a good view of Glen Muick (see p. 68), in 
which Glenmuick House is a conspicuous object. In about a 
mile and a half the road crosses the Bridge of Gairn (p. 69) . 

Two miles beyond is Coilacreich Inn, and looking back 
a good view is obtained of Craigendarroch and the Pass of 
Ballater. Farther westward is Geallaig (2,439 feet), more 
prominent than any other hill on the north side of the road. 

At its base, just below the forty-seventh milestone, are the 
ruins of an ancient place of worship known as Chapel Manaar, 
a name which very probably commemorates St. Manaar, an 
early Christian missionary, who is recorded in the Aberdeen 
Breviary as having laboured for the conversion of the pagan 
inhabitants of the district of Mar. A standing stone within 
the ruins, though variously regarded as the old reading-desk 
of the church and as one of a Druidical circle, is most likely 
the door lintel doing duty as a gravestone. Interments are 
known to have taken place in the ruined chapel in the early 
part of last century. 

A little farther is — 

Abergeldie Castle, 

six miles from Ballater. The estate joins that of Balmoral 
and is held on lease by His Majesty. The Castle is romanti- 



74 ABERGELDIE 

cally situated in a fine valley on the south side of the river 
and faces the south road. It seems entirely closed in by the 
mountains, and thus appears to be isolated, though, in fact, 
it stands in the midst of the valley. The original building 
is an old plain, square turreted tower. Considerable additions 
were made by Queen Victoria, and the premises were modern- 
ized and the house made comfortable for the reception of 
guests. It was frequently occupied by King Edward VII 
when Prince of Wales. 

The Geldie Barn, from which the Castle takes its name, 
enters the Dee some two hundred yards to the west. The 
handsome suspension footbridge, by which the Castle is 
reached from the north side of the river, was erected by Queen 
Victoria in 1885. 

Abergeldie has always been celebrated for its birches, and 
is the theme of a well-known song, the tune of which was 
borrowed by Burns for his Birks of Aberfeldy. The original 
song runs : 

" Bonnie lassie, will ye go, 
Will ye go, will ye go, 
Bonnie lassie, will ye go 
To the Birks o' Abergeldie ? 
Ye shall get a gown, o' silk, 
A gcwn o' silk, a gown o' silk, 
Ye shall get a gown o' silk, 
And a coat o' callimankie. 

Na, kind sir, I dare na gang, 
I dare na gang, I dare na gang, 
Na, kind sir, I dare na gang, 
My minnie will be angry ; 
Sair, sair, wad she flyte, 
Wad she flyte, wad she flyte ; 
Sair, sair, wad she flyte, 
And sair wad she ban me." 

Formerly a large market was held at Clachanturn, a once 
populous hamlet on the South Road, three-quarters of a mile 
beyond the Castle. 

Less than half-way between the 49th and the 50th milestone 
is — 

Crathie Church, 

on a low hill on the north side of the road. Here the King 
worships when at Balmoral, the Castle being in the parish of 
Crathie. The Church is quite a modern building, the 



CRATHIE CHURCH 75 

memorial stone having been laid by Queen Victoria in 1893. 
The south transept is reserved for the royal family and the 
royal household. 

On the pillar between the chancel and the south transept 
is a memorial of Queen Victoria, placed there in 1903 by King 
Edward VII. It consists of a beautiful white marble bust 
of the Queen, standing in a niche of red granite, with the 
inscription : 

" In dutiful and beloved remembrance of Victoria, Queen of 
Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India ; this monument is 
erected by her sorrowing and devoted son, Edward R. and I." 

King Edward is commemorated by the communion table 
and a screen, unveiled by King George in 1911. 

The table is of Iona marble, white, with beautiful veining 
in green and black. The top is formed of a solid slab. There 
are three panels in front and one at each end. The screen 
forms the background of the table, rising against the wall to 
a height of about eight feet. It is of oak over 300 years old, 
obtained from a country house in Leicestershire. The carving 
is in the late Scottish Gothic style, after the manner of the 
famous work of King's College Chapel, Aberdeen. The fret- 
work is lace-like in its delicacy. Here and there the rose 
and the Scots thistle appear. Surmounting the four main 
posts are figures of angels holding shields. On the moulding, 
almost on a level with the table, is the inscription : 

" 1910. In Piam Memoriam Edwardi VII., Britt. Omn. Regis, 
Fid. Def. Ind. Imp. Posuit Filius Georgius, R. et I." 

The church which previously served Crathie parish is now 
an ivy-clad ruin situated near the river. In its churchyard 
is a monument erected by Queen Victoria over the grave of her 
" devoted and faithful personal attendant," John Brown, who 
died in 1883. 

Hard by the ruined church is the manse of Crathie, a most 
picturesque old house, embowered in birches and mountain- 
ash trees. 

A suspension bridge over the Dee at Crathie leads to the 
village of Balmoral. 

The first turn of the road after Crathie Church brings the 
traveller in view of — 



76 BALMORAL CASTLE 

Balmoral Castle. 

Neither the Castle nor the grounds are open to the public, but during the 
absence of His Majesty the grounds are open two days a week to those who 
obtain an admission order, application for which must be made by letter to the 
Factor, Balmoral. 

The mansion appears to be in a hollow, although it is nearly 
a thousand feet above the level of the sea. Yet, as M'Gilli- 
vray says, " Were it on a bog or on a sandbank, it would be 
in one sense just as interesting. But it is a beautiful object 
in itself, and receives from the birch forest that stretches far 
around it an increase of beauty. Whether this be one of the 
finest sites on the Dee or not, it is yet by far the most inter- 
esting and perhaps ever will be." 

It stands opposite the fiftieth milestone, on a small level 
tract at the foot of Craig Gowan, close to the Dee, and was 
erected by the Prince Consort in 1854, from plans prepared 
by an Aberdeen architect, though the Prince himself designed 
the principal features. It is of light-coloured granite, in the 
Scottish Baronial style, and comprises two blocks, with 
connecting wings, bartisan turrets, and a projecting tower, 
100 feet high, in which is a clock. The servants' quarters are 
on the north-east of the Castle. During King Edward's 
time they were considerably enlarged, as were also the gar- 
dens. The Castle is approached by a road between tall and 
stately trees. The main frontage faces the south or south- 
east. The west front is more pleasing to the eye, partly 
because the length is in more harmonious proportion to the 
height. 

In the beautiful and extensive grounds are a pretty obelisk 
erected to the memory of the Princess Alice ; a bronze statue 
of her illustrious father ; a tall Celtic cross commemorating 
the Duke of Coburg, the second son of Queen Victoria ; a 
bronze statue of his beloved mother, erected by the royal 
tenantry and household servants ; and a massive granite 
fountain erected by the tenants and servants in memory of 
King Edward VII. There is alsb a row of trees, each of 
which was planted by a member of the Royal family. 

On the hills which form the background to the picture are 
several cairns. One celebrates the purchase of the estate 
by the Prince Consort, another was erected in honour of the 
wedding of Queen Victoria's eldest daughter. Then there 
are the Prince Consort's cairn, of pyramidal form, on the sum- 




Valentine & Sous, Ltd.,] [Dundee. 

UPPER FALLS OF GARAWALT, BRAEMAR. 




/. & J. Bissei,] 



CRATHIE CHURCH. 
24 



[Ballater. 



BALLATER TO BALMORAL 77 

mit of Craig Lurachain, and others commemorating various 
events connected with the royal family. 

The finest view of the Castle and grounds is obtained from 
Birchwood Cottage, on the North Road, where tea may be 
had. 

The estate was purchased from the trustees of the Earl of 
Fife for ^31,500 and bequeathed by the Prince Consort to 
Queen Victoria, who left it as a residence for subsequent 
sovereigns. The royal estate, owned and leased, extends to 
within a mile and a half of Ballater, and in the opposite 
direction takes in Ballochbuie Forest, which was not included 
in the original purchase, but was subsequently bought by 
Queen Victoria. The estate is entirely south of the Dee.] 

The South Road 
between Ballater and Balmoral is a little longer and is less 
frequented by tourists than is the North Road. It is exceed- 
ingly picturesque, however, although in parts the view is 
restricted by the proximity of hills and the density of the 
forest. 

From Ballater the road is entered by crossing the bridge 
over the Dee. Thence to the right. In a short distance the 
Bridge of Muick is reached, and from that the distance to 
Balmoral is 7 J miles. Close to the Bridge is the gate of the 
churchyard of Glen Muick, and near it is a slab inscribed 
" 1596. I.M. 1772." The dates are said to be those of the 
birth and death of a John Mitchell, who lived at Dalliefour, 
about a mile to the north-west ! 

Half a mile or so from the bridge the road divides. The 
right-hand branch is taken, and Knock Castle is almost imme- 
diately passed on the right. Then comes the entrance to 
the road along the west wide of Glen Muick. Some two miles 
beyond is the mouth of Strath Girnock, guarded by a hill on 
each side, that on the east being Creag Phiobaidh (1,462 feet), 
that on the west, Creag Ghuibhais (1,593 feet). In this 
strath, as in the Highland glens generally, the population 
has considerably decreased through the land held by the 
crofters having been thrown into the deer forests. For in- 
stance, the extensive deer forest of Glen Muick includes a 
tract which, till 1870, formed part of one of the finest grazings 
in Aberdeenshire, and whereas there were once fifty farmers 
to take their produce to the old mill still to be seen, the Glen 
cannot now muster more than one-fifth of that number. 



78 BALMORAL TO BRAEMAR 

Descending abruptly to the Dee, west of Creag Ghuibhais, 
is the finely wooded hill of Creag nam Ban. On the summit 
a reputed witch, named Katie Rankie, is said to have been 
burned alive. 

Rather more than two miles beyond the bridge over Girnock 
Burn is Abergeldie Castle, already described, and J mile 
farther is Clachanturn, once a populous hamlet. Another 
J mile brings one to a suspension bridge for foot passengers. 
Southward is the Lochnagar Distillery. A little west of the 
bridge, the neat village of Easter Balmoral is passed on the 
left, and the South Road shortly comes to an end at the 
Bridge Lodge of Balmoral Castle. Balmoral Bridge, erected 
by the Prince Consort, connects the South and North roads_ 

Ascent of Lochnagar. Balmoral is the starting-point of 
the easiest ascent of Lochnagar, but the road is open only at 
certain times, and then only to those who have obtained 
permission to use it. When royalty is resident at the Castle, 
or shooting is taking place, the road is barred. The lower 
portion of the route is a carriage-road along Glen Gelder. 
The road is succeeded by a well-kept pony track, and when 
that fails, the route is indicated by two parallel ruts a few 
yards apart. The start is made from Crathie, and the visitor 
will have no difficulty there in getting directed to the spot 
from which to climb. 

Balmoral to Braemar. 

The first object of interest westward of Balmoral Castle is 
Carn-na-Cuimhne (the Cairn of Remembrance), on the south 
side of the road, just beyond the 51st milestone. Its Gaelic 
name is the slogan of the Farquharsons, and the spot is said 
to have been the rendezvous of the clan when summoned to 
battle. When they were assembled each man contributed a 
stone to the cairn, and on their return each bore one away. 
The number left represented the slain. Opposite the cairn 
is the mouth of the Gelder, a burn that comes from the Loch 
of Lochnagar. 

Near the 52nd milestone is the Invercauld Arms. Behind 
the inn is a tree-clad rock named Craig-na-Spaine. 

For about two miles from the inn the road runs over a 
narrow, level tract, called the Muir of Inver, and passes the 
Forest of Ballochbuie, a steep, pine-covered mountain on the 
left, south of the river. It is said that Farquharson of Inver- 
cauld became possessed of it in exchange for a tartan plaid. 



CRAIG CLUNIE— INVERCAULD HOUSE 79 

In allusion to this tradition, Queen Victoria, when she became 
the owner, erected a stone on which is inscribed : " Queen 
Victoria entered into possession of Ballochbuie on the 15th 
day of May, 1878. The bonniest plaid in Scotland." In 
the heart of the forest is a small royal cottage called Danzig 
Shiel. A private bridge leads to it, just short of the 55th 
milestone. 

Nearly a mile farther, the Dee is crossed by a bridge 
erected in 1752. It is the property of the King, having 
been taken over from the public when a portion of the South 
Road was closed, but visitors to the Falls of Garawalt {see 
p. 84) are allowed to use it. A few yards above the old bridge 
is one that was erected to take its place at the expense of 
Prince Albert. It is known as the Invercauld Bridge, and 
commands a fine view of the river, the bed of which is here 
intersected by a ridge of slaty rock, by which the stream is 
broken into a succession of little falls and rapids. 

The road to Braemar crosses this bridge and then lies 
through a beautiful tract, overhung on the southern side by 
craggy hills and rocks, profusely wooded along their bases 
and even on their summits. Not far above the bridge is an 
immense stone, on the right, called Erskine's Stone, but more 
commonly the Meikle Stane o' Cluny. It has probably fallen 
from Craig Clunie, on the opposite side of the road, and is 
said to have been one of the boundary stones between the 
lands of Erskine of Clunie and Farquharson of Invercauld. 

Craig Clunie is a stately rock rising from the bottom of the 
glen, as straight almost as an arrow. In its precipitous face, 
just beyond the 56th milestone, is a recess some 600 feet 
above the road. This is called the Charter Chest, because in 
it were concealed the Invercauld titles and papers after the 
Rebellion of 1715. And if tradition may be believed it was 
for ten months the hiding-place of the laird himself, whose 
mortification was increased by the sounds of merriment made 
by the soldiers in his house. 

Now the valley opens out, and on a beautiful green terrace, 
swept round by the Dee and backed by plantations ofpine and 
other trees, stands — 

Invercauld House, 
one of the finest mansions in Scotland. It is in the Scottish 
Baronial style, the principal feature being a battlemented 
tower some 70 feet in height. It dates from the fifteenth 



80 BRAEMAR 

century, but was enlarged and partly reconstructed in 1875. 
Here the Jacobites assembled before " going out " in 171 5, 
and from it the Earl of Mar issued his summons to the clans. 

On the south side of the road, opposite the house, is the 
Lion's Face Rock, a lofty cliff, but the leonine shape of the 
upper portion is not now easily seen by reason of the growth 
of trees. From the Lion's Face a road runs off on the left to 
Braemar. It passes round the south side of Creag Choinnich, 
or Kenneth's Crag (named from Kenneth II, who had a hunt- 
ing lodge at Braemar), but is closed to the public from Sep- 
tember 20 to November 30. It is known as the Lion's Face 
Road, and also as the Queen's Drive, as it was one of Queen 
Victoria's favourite drives from Balmoral. 

The main road keeps on the north side of the crag, and 
passes on the right Braemar Castle, whose peaked turrets 
and weather-stained walls accord well with the wild scenery. 
It occupies a fine position on a knoll in the centre of an exten- 
sive park, and is now a private residence. It was built by 
the Government in the reign of George II, and was long used 
as barracks. Half a mile farther is — 

Braemar. 

Angling. — Visitors at the Fife Arms Hotel may fish a part of the " Invercauld 
Upper Water " of the Dee. Permission to go trouting in waters around 
Braemar can be obtained from the proprietors of the waters or the lessees 
of the shootings to whom the fishings are let. 

Bank. — Union Bank of Scotland. 

Golf. — An 18-hole course. The lies are good, the greens large, varied and sport- 
ing. A professional resides at the clubhouse during the summer months. 
Visitors: day, 2s. 6d. ; week, 9s. ; fortnight, 15s.; month, 25s. ; season, 
30s. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. Furnished villas and apartments. 

Places of Worship. — Established, United Free, Episcopal, Roman Catholic. 

Population. — 502. 

Post Office, — Open 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on week-days ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. and 
1.30 to 2.30 p.m. 

Reading and Billiard Rooms. — In the Victoria Hall, Auchendryne. 

Tennis. — Courts in connection with the Victoria Hall, Castletown. 

^Braemar is a village 1,100 feet above the sea, surrounded 
on all sides by well-wooded, lofty hills, which effectually 
shield it from winter winds. It has a dry climate considering 
its position, and its air is remarkably pure and bracing. 
Indeed, Braemar is reputed as having the most bracing 
climate on Deeside, and the most healthy in Great Britain. 
There is a good system of drainage, and excellent water is 
brought down from reservoirs in the hills. 

The village is on both sides of the Clunie Water, a little 



BRAEMAR 81 

above the junction of that stream with the Dee. The portion 
on the east bank is called the Castletown, and that on the west 
Auchendryne, but the whole village is frequently called the 
Castletown of Braemar. It owes the name of Castletown to 
having been the site of a castle erected by Malcolm Canmore. 
Traces of the building may be seen at the east end of the 
bridge that spans the Clunie. Other Scottish sovereigns also 
occasionally resided in this part of their dominion. But 
Braemar to-day is quite modern. The prosperity and favour 
it enjoys are not due to the royal' patronage of other days, 
but to the opening up of Deeside to tourists. At the begin- 
ning of the nineteenth century it was one of the meanest of 
Highland clachans. Now it has two palatial hotels and 
numerous substantial private residences. Most of the houses 
are devoted to the accommodation of summer visitors, but 
during the height of the season it is sometimes quite impossible 
to obtain even the humblest lodging. 

As the village is situated amidst mountain scenery of the 
wildest grandeur, and is the best centre from which to make 
excursions in the Eastern Grampians, it has become a favour- 
ite resort of mountaineers and pedestrians, " while to the 
restful lover of nature and seeker after health, who is content 
to look on and be satisfied with the wondrous pictures of 
mountain and river, sunshine and cloud, which present them- 
selves in never-ending variety, there are few spots in the 
United Kingdom where so much of health and material for 
pleasant retrospect can be found." 

On The Cottage, which stands at the south end of Castletown 
Terrace, is a tablet inscribed : " Here R. L. Stevenson spent 
the summer of 1881, and wrote Treasure Island, his first great 
work." 

The motor omnibuses from Ballater first draw up at the 
Invercauld Arms Hotel, at the east end of the village, partly 
situated on the mound on which the Earl of Mar raised his 
standard of rebellion in 171 5, as is commemorated by an 
inscription on a brass plate in the oriel window of the dining- 
room. On the return journey to Ballater, they start from the 
Fife Arms, on the other side of the Bridge of Clunie. The 
bridge should not be hurriedly crossed. Ben Avon forms 
the background of the view over its northern parapet, and 
near at hand, on the south, is the Mill of Clunie, which has 
been sketched and photographed times without number. 
There are many other lovely bits of torrent scenery on the 

Aberdeen (/) 



82 EXCURSIONS FROM BRAEMAR 

Clunie, which rushes through a rocky ravine fringed with 
beautiful trees. 

Braemar contains a meteorological observatory founded 
by the Prince Consort. 

The Braemar Gathering is held in August annually in the 
Princess Royal Park, and is patronized by the royalties then 
in residence at Balmoral. In addition to the assemblage of 
Farquharson, Duff, and Balmoral Highlanders, Highland 
games and sports are carried on. The meeting is a very 
popular one and attracts large crowds from all parts of Dee- 
side and even from Aberdeen. 



EXCURSIONS FROM BRAEMAR. 

Ascent of Morrone Hill (2,819 feet). A good idea of the 
characteristic features of the district can most conveniently 
be obtained by ascending this height, which overlooks the 
village from the western angle formed by the Clunie with the 
Dee. The distance to the summit is a little over two miles. 
The name is a corruption of Mor Shron, signifying big nose. 

The way to the foot is by the Linn of Dee Road, and the 
ascent is begun a few hundred yards from the village or from 
the golf course. Almost as soon as one begins to climb, 
delightful views open out, while from the summit there is a 
grand panorama. Ben-a-Bourd is seen towering over the 
heights to the north and north-west ; to the left of that are 
Ben Muich Dhui (or Macdhui), Cairn Toul, the Devil's Point, 
and other peaks with less familiar names. To the south 
are the mountains of Glen Shee, and eastward is " dark 
Lochnagar." But the chief delight will probably come from 
the view of the valleys of the Dee and the Quoich, and from 
the contrasts of colour between the wide slopes of purple 
heather, the dark green of the fir woods, and the lighter green 
of the low-lying meads. 

The Linn of Quoich. The Quoich Water rises on Ben-a- 
Bourd and joins the Dee some two miles westward of Brae- 
mar. In the woody glen through which it flows, the stream 
makes a succession of falls between half a mile and a mile 
above the Dee. The best view-point is a foot-bridge. The 
charm of the falls is chiefly due to the narrow rocky gorge. 
The stream rushes along with great force and has worn in the 
rocks a number of cup-like cavities which give the rivulet its 
name, quoich, or quaich, being the Gaelic equivalent of cup. 
One of the cavities is known as the Earl of Mar's Punch Bowl, 
and tradition says it was so named because the Earl of Mar 
made punch in it when he raised the standard of rebellion in 




/. & J. Bisset,] 



[Ballater. 



THE LINN OF PEE. 
26 



CORRIEMULZIE— LINN OF DEE 83 

Braemar. It could not be used for such a purpose now, for 
the swirling water has worn away its bottom. 

Carriages can usually cross the Dee by a ford about a mile 
west of the village. The Victoria Bridge, 3^ miles west, 
is sometimes open to pedestrians ; when it is closed they 
must go eastward to Invercauld Bridge and then follow the 
road that runs past the back of Invercauld House. To pre- 
vent disappointment the best available route should be 
ascertained before leaving the village. 

The Linn of Corriemulzie, the Colonel's Bed, and the Linn 
of Dee. These all lie west of the village, the Corriemulzie 
Falls being three miles distant, the Linn of Dee six, and the 
Colonel's Bed about midway between the two, but a mile and 
a half off the high-road. They are reached by following the 
road along the south side of the river, through scenery of the 
most charming description. 

The Falls of Corriemulzie are the finest on Deeside — though 
somewhat spoiled now by the diversion of some of the water 
in connection with an electric light service for Mar Lodge. 
They are reached by a path entered through a wicket on the 
north side of the road. The stream rushes through a narrow 
ravine that is almost hidden by overhanging birch trees, and 
carpeted with ferns and wild flowers. It is a most delightful 
retreat on a hot day. 

About half a mile beyond the burn is the Victoria Bridge, 
mentioned above. It was opened by King Edward VII in 
1905. and replaced an earlier structure bearing the same 
name. 

A little to the west of the bridge, low down on the opposite 
side of the river, will be seen Mar Lodge, a spacious residence 
erected by the late Duke of Fife in place of New Mar Lodge, 
which stood to the south of the road between Corriemulzie 
Burn and the Victoria Bridge, and was destroyed by fire. 
The new mansion, completed in 1898, occupies a lovely 
position, near the river, with a background of wooded hills. 
At the rear of the mansion is a beautiful chapel, in the 
Xorman style. 

Midway between the Falls of Corriemulzie and the Linn of 
Dee is the hamlet of Inverey, standing, as its name implies, 
on the Ey Water. A road runs up the Glen, and by following 
it for a mile and a half one reaches the Colonel's Bed, a cave 
in a picturesque gorge, and only a few feet above the water's 
edge. After the battle of Killiecrankie it was, for several 
months, the hiding-place of Colonel Farquharson of Inverey. 

Continuing along the high-road for a mile and a half beyond 
the hamlet, the Linn of Dee is reached. Here the river, at a 
height of 1,243 feet above the sea, rushes through a deep and 
narrow channel in the rocks some eighty yards in length and 



84 FALLS OF GARAWALT— LOCHNAGAR 

in one place not more than four feet in breadth. The force 
of the water has smoothed and polished the sides of the gorge, 
and ground out cup-like cavities. On escaping from the 
rocks, the water falls into a pool which, in the popular idea, 
is bottomless, but is really only some forty feet deep. Flowing 
thence, the river increases in breadth, and has a comparatively 
untroubled course. 

The Linn is crossed by a granite bridge that was opened 
by Queen Victoria in 1857, and took the place of " an alpine 
wooden bridge " which some thirty years before had been 
substituted for a plank that had been used by those who 
could not or would not jump across. 

The Falls of Garawalt. This excursion is a pleasant walk 
of eight miles there and back, but the falls can be visited 
only on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, between the 
hours of ten and three, and when the Court is at Balmoral 
a pass is required. Follow the Ballater road to a point 
a few yards below Invercauld Bridge, and there pass through 
a gateway on the right, across the old Bridge of Dee, beyond 
which the route lies through His Majesty's private grounds, 
and is clearly indicated. The return may be made by the 
Queen's Drive (or vice versa). On the return it would be 
entered from the main road by a footpath on the left, about 
a mile west of the bridge. It is a grassy road at a slightly 
higher level than the main road. The falls are three in num- 
ber. The lowest is the largest. -Although the volume 
of water is not large, the cascades are very beautiful and are 
much frequented by tourists. 

To Loch Callater. About five miles from Braemar. It 
is on the route to the summit of Lochnagar, as described 
below. Visitors who cannot ascend the mountain should 
try to get as far as the loch, as the route lies through char- 
acteristic Highland scenery. 

Ascent of Lochnagar (3,786 feet). The route from Braemar 
is more interesting and more used than either of the others, 
but is rougher. A carriage can be taken five miles. The 
time required for the ascent is from four to five hours. Ponies 
and guides can be obtained. 

The route begins by running southward from Braemar 
along the Blairgowrie high-road, which lies on the east side 
of Clunie Water. In a couple of jniles the Callater Burn, a 
tributary of the Clunie, is reached, and after crossing it, the 
course of the affluent is followed. Between one and two 
miles from the bridge the road goes over to the eastern side 
of the burn and continues to the foot of Loch Callater, from 
which the summit of Lochnagar is distant about seven miles. 
At the Loch the carriage-road ceases, and a track goes off on 
the left towards Cairn Taggart (3,430 feet). It turns to the 



BRAEMAR TO BLAIRGOWRIE 85 

right to round this, the ridge being crossed half a mile south 
of the summit, and then there comes into view on the right 
a desolate glen fitly named Dubh Loch, i.e., Black Water. 
After crossing the stream which flows through this glen the 
road runs in a fairly direct line to the summit of Lochnagar, 
which lies away to the north-west by west. The only spot 
at which there is any probability of the track being missed 
is where the turn to the right must be made to round Cairn 
Taggart. 

Those who desire to become fully acquainted with the 
topography, history, traditions, geology, and botany of the 
mountain should consult McConnochie's Lochnagar. 

To Blairgowrie (35 miles). This and the route via Ballater 
are the only through carriage routes to and from Braemar. 
Motors run on certain days during the summer. 

The tour is one of the finest drives in Scotland. Motorists 
who use this road should be prepared for rough going ; they 
should also be ready to negotiate the steep Devil's Elbow. 
Leaving Braemar, the road runs along the eastern side of the 
Clunie Water and in a couple of miles crosses the Callater 
Burn and then continues along Glen Clunie. Ten miles 
from Braemar the highest point on the route is reached. It 
lies between Cairnwell (3,059 feet) on the right, and Glas Maol 
(3,502 feet) on the left, and has an altitude of 2,200 feet. 

From the top of the pass there is a steep descent through 
Glen Beg to the Spital of Glenshee Hotel, the shoulder of the 
Cairnwell being crossed by a zigzag road that falls 200 feet 
in half a mile, and is known as the Devil's Elbow. The 
hotel is at the junction of Glen Beg with Glens Tatnich and 
Lochy, 15 miles from Braemar. Opposite is a tumulus 
known as Diarmid's Tomb. Thence the road is along Glen 
Shee. In about 9 miles it passes on the left Mount Blair 
(2,441 feet), and two miles farther comes to the Percie Inn. 
Three and a half miles below is the Bridge of Cally, which 
affords a fine view of the Eardle, that here unites with the 
Shee, the stream so formed being called the Ericht. Four 
miles from the bridge the Ericht flows through a rocky ravine, 
along one side of which is the road, while on the other stands 
Craighall, which Lockhart tells us was the original of Tully- 
veolan of Waverley, " the habitation of the Barons of Brad- 
wardine." Two miles farther is Blairgowrie, a favourite 
summer resort of tourists, who are attracted by the beautiful 
scenery by which it is surrounded and the excellent fishing 
within easy distance. A branch, 5 miles long, connects 
Blairgowrie with the main Caledonian line at Coupar Angus. 

To Loch Builg (13 miles), Tomintoul (24), and Ballindalloch, 
on the Speyside line of the G.N.S.R. (40), or Grantown (38). 
There is a carriage-road all the way, with the exception of 



86 EXCURSIONS FROM BRAEMAR 

four miles between Loch Builg and Inchrory Lodge. (For 
description of the through road route, via Cock Bridge, see 
p. 95.) Follow the Ballater Road to a point a little beyond 
Invercauld Bridge and there take a road on the left. At a 
fork which soon occurs, keep to the right and the road runs 
in a north-easterly direction towards the Feardar Burn, 
half a mile short of which it divides, and then the left-hand 
branch must be taken. 

The right-hand branch leads to the Invercauld Arms at Inver. 
By proceeding thither and returning to Braemar by the high-road, 
or vice versd, one will make a very pleasant circular excursion of 
fourteen miles. 

The left-hand road leads across the burn and then has a 
zigzag course to the highest point, which has an elevation of 
2,200 feet. The ascent affords fine views of the Dee Valley. 
The descent to Loch Builg is across a dreary moorland. The 
Loch is about a mile in length. It is on the borders of the 
shires of Aberdeen and Banff, and is jointly owned by the 
Duke of Richmond and Farquharson of Invercauld. The 
latter has a shooting-lodge by the side of the Loch, and this 
is the only habitation on its shores, which are uninteresting. 

At Loch Builg the carriage-road ceases and a track runs 
along the eastern side of the loch and continues in a northerly 
direction until it strikes the Builg Burn, about half a mile 
from the Loch, which it then follows along the eastern bank 
to the carriage-road in the vicinity of Inchrory Shooting 
Lodge. Thence there is a good road, following the course 
of the Avon through interesting scenery to Tomintoul, the 
highest village in Great Britain. A mile and a half short 
of the village is the gorge of the Ailnack. The scenery 
here is particularly fine. 

The route between Tomintoul and Ballindalloch, on the 
Strathspey line, is included in the Three Rivers Tour. 
From June to October, motor-'buses run daily between the 
two places, both described on later pages. 

Tomintoul is connected with Grantown by a rough carriage- 
road over which public motors run at stated times. 

To Blair Atholl via Glen Tilt (30 miles). The road passes the Linn 
of Dee and carriages may be taken as far as Bynack Lodge, 14 
miles. If telegraphed for to Blair Atholl a carriage will be waiting 
at Forest Lodge, 8 miles from Blafr Atholl, thus reducing the 
distance that must be walked to 8 miles. There is no house of 
entertainment between Blair Atholl and Braemar. 

The bridge at the Linn of Dee is crossed, and the road to the left 
is followed. Three miles from the Linn the Dee is again crossed 
and the route thence lies along the western side of Bynack Burn 
until after the Geldie Burn has been crossed about two miles from 
the last bridge over the Dee. It then crosses the Bynack Burn, 



EXCURSIONS FROM BRAEMAR 87 

but keeps close to it as far as the shooting-lodge. There, as has 
been said, the carriage-road ceases, and is succeeded by a bridle- 
path that in parts is exceedingly rough. It goes almost due south 
to the highest point, 1,550 feet above sea-level, but only 450 above 
Braemar. This point is about two miles from Bynack Lodge. The 
descent is through Glen Tilt, the track following closely the course 
of the river. 

Cyclists occasionally take this route, but between the Forest 
Lodge and Bynack the machine and the rider must change places. 

Rough as is the route in its central portion, it is, as a whole, 
easier and less rough, as well as shorter by a couple of miles, than 
the route between Braemar and Aviemore. 

To Clova (19 miles), thence to Kirriemuir (34) or to Brechin (42). 
The route at first is along Glen Clunie and then by the side of the 
Callater Burn past Loch Callater. It has been described as far as 
the Loch on p. 84. The track keeps along the north bank of the 
lake, a dark-looking sheet of water nearly a mile long, and thence is 
fairly plain on the north side of the burn to the ridge of the Tol- 
mount (3,145 feet), 9 miles from Braemar. The descent is made to 
the right of the White Water. Although there is a right of way, 
there is not, in all parts, a well-defined track, but by keeping the 
White Water in view on the right, the head of Glen Clova will be 
reached and the carriage-road will be struck 3 miles short of Clova. 
For Clova and the route to Kirriemuir, see p. 71. 

Brechin may be reached from Clova by a rough walk of ten miles 
in an east-north-east direction to Loch Lee, where connection is 
made with the route from Ballater (see p. 72) ; or by crossing the 
South Esk at Cortachy, some three miles short of Kirriemuir, and 
following the carriage-road which runs thence to Brechin. 

To Kirkton of Glenisla (25 miles) and Alyth (31). The route 
follows the Blairgowrie road, already described, for about 8 miles. 
A few yards short of a bridge over the main stream it passes to a 
track that goes off to the left and ascends to a height of nearly 
3,200 feet between Cairn-na-Glasha on the left and Glas Maol on the 
right. This point is about 2 miles from the spot where the Blair- 
gowrie road was left. From it the track proceeds to Monega Hill 
(2,917 feet) and from the ridge of that follows a small stream (the 
Glas Burn) to the Isla. The course is then along the latter, and 
in a mile is the shooting-lodge of Tulchan, while a couple of miles 
farther down the glen are some picturesque falls near the confluence 
of the Cally Burn with the Isla. Three miles lower the traveller 
passes the ruins of Forter Castle, a property of the Earl of Airlie. 
Thence the route is along the left-hand side of the stream, and at the 
end of 4 miles it reaches Kirton of Glenisla, where there is a com- 
fortable hotel. (A mail coach runs between Glenisla and Alyth.) 

From the hotel a track leads in about two miles to a high-road near 
the summit of the Druim Dearg [Red Ridge), 1,487 feet high. 

Alyth is the centre of some pleasant excursions, particulars of 
which are given in our companion Guide to the Highlands. The town 
is connected by a short branch with the main line of the Caledonian 
Railway. 

To Aviemore, on the Highland Railway (30 miles), and Lynwilg 
(32), lid the Larig Ghru Pass. The central portion of the route 
is extremely rough. At various points finger-posts have been 
erected by the Right of Way Society, but the roads in the Rothie- 



88 EXCURSIONS FROM BRAEMAR 

murchus Forest, at the latter end of the route, are very bewildering. 

From Braemar the route is to the Linn of Dee and across the 
bridge there. Pedestrians may go direct to the Bridge of Lui, about 
a mile up the stream, but carriages must go a quarter of a mile down 
by the Dee and then up by the side of the Lui Water. The Bridge 
of Lui is crossed and the road is followed up the stream to Derry 
Lodge, about 12 miles from Braemar. This is the farthest point to 
which carriages can be taken. 

The route thence is across the Derry Burn and along the north 
side of the Lui Beg Bum. Just beyond the bridge that spans the 
Derry Burn a road runs off on the right to Speyside, while on the 
south side of the Lui Beg Burn is the keeper's cottage, at which 
simple refreshment can be obtained. The traveller will not see 
another house for 16 miles. 

The route lies along the north side of the burn for a couple of miles 
and then crosses the stream. (The track that continues with the 
burn goes over Ben Muich Dhui, or Macdhui.) It keeps its west- 
ward direction for a mile or so and then inclines towards the north, 
and leads into Glen Dee opposite the Devil's Point (3,3°3 feetl. It 
crosses the Dee about half a mile above the inflow of the Garachory 
Burn, an important feeder that comes from the west between Cairn 
Toul and Braeriach. After crossing the Dee, the traveller must keep 
close to its western side and will then soon come to the Pools of 
Dee— four tiny tarns. Just beyond them is the summit of the pass, 
from which the way is over boulders to the left side of the stream, 
and along that bank the route lies for a short 2 miles. Then it passes 
to the other side and keeps to that to the confluence of the stream 
which has been followed (the Allt-na-Leirg) with a large stream 
from the south (the Allt-na-Beinne-Moire). Having crossed near 
the confluence, the traveller has the choice of two routes. He may 
continue by the side of the burn for a couple of miles to Coylum 
Bridge, and thence by the high-road to Aviemore station, 2 miles 
distant, or he may take the carriage-road westward to Loch an Eilean 
(2 miles), and then take either the first or the second road on the 
right past that, turning to the left when it joins the road from 
Coylum Bridge, and to the right after passing under the railway. 
The latter route is about a mile longer than the former. 

At Lynwilg there is a comfortable hotel. It lies about two miles 
to the south of Aviemore station. 

In going to Braemar by this route the walk can be shortened by 
driving past Loch an Eilean to the Allt-na-Leirg, and by wiring to 
Braemar for a carriage to be in waiting at Derry Lodge. 

To Kingussie, on the Highland Railway (30 miles). The first 
part of the route is that to Blair Atholl till the Geldie Burn is reached, 
when a road on the left bank of the Geldie is taken. The journey 
may be accomplished in a carriage to Geldie Lodge. Shortly after 
passing Geldie Lodge, a good path leads to Glenfeshie Lodge, where 
a carriage from Kingussie can be in waiting. 



DONSIDE AND THE VALE OF ALFORD. 

THE Don rises not far from the headsprings of the Dee, to 
which in its course of eighty miles it runs parallel. 
The scenery of its valley is less attractive than that of the Dee, 
and differs greatly from it, the points of contrast being tersely 
indicated in two popular distichs. One asserts that — 

"Ae rood o' Don's worth twa o' Dee, 
Unless it be for fish or tree." 

The other declares — 

"The river Dee for fish and tree, 
The river Don for horn and corn." 

In spite of these sayings good fish are to be got from the 
Don. Indeed, as a trout stream it is unsurpassed, and it 
would doubtless rank high as a salmon stream but for the 
pollutions from factories and the number of dams and other 
obstacles in the last few miles of its course. As it is, the river 
has some first-rate salmon pools. 

The railway route as far as Dyce Junction, 6 miles from 
Aberdeen, has been described in connection with the Buchan 
Line. About i£ miles west of the Junction are the Standing 
Stones, twelve in number, forming the largest Druidical circle 
in Aberdeenshire. 

Taking a north-westerly direction from this point, the line 
enters a wider valley of the Don — an agricultural and wood- 
land district, well-tilled fields alternating with clumps of 
wood and plantations. Some 8£ miles from Aberdeen is the 
roadside station of Pitmedden, where, on the left, is Pitmedden 
House, built by Mr. George Thompson, sometime M.P. for 
the city of Aberdeen, and founder of the celebrated Ab erdeen 
line of clippers and steamers. 

Next comes — 

Kinaldie. 
Here the Don flows through low-lying " haughs " that are 
often under water when the river is in flood. 

89 



90 KINTORE— INVERURIE 

About half a mile below the station the Don receives the Kinal- 
die Bum, about 5 miles in length and nearly all open to the public. 
The sport is poor. 

After Kinaldie station comes — 

Kintore, 
the junction for the Alford Valley Railway, which follows in 
part the course of the Don. Kintore is an ancient place, 
with a quaint town hall. A mile to the west are the ruins of 
Hallforest Castle, said to have been a hunting tower of King 
Robert the Bruce. The building was inhabited as late as 
1639. The forest and castle were given by Bruce to Sir 
Robert Keith, whose descendant is Earl of Kintore at the 
present day. In the vicinity of Hallforest is the nesting- 
ground of vast numbers of sea-gulls. When the birds are 
in residence the spot is a very interesting sight. 

Three miles from Kintore (16 J from Aberdeen) is Inverurie 
Junction, from which a line, some six miles in length, runs 
off on the right to Old Meldrum, in the midst of romantic 
scenery, and possessing a golf course of 9 holes, while on 
the left are the engineering and locomotive shops of the 
Railway Company. 

Inverurie 

is a pleasant little town in a fine agricultural district. Per- 
mits to fish portions of the Don and the Urie are granted by 
the local magistrates, free of charge. About a mile and a 
half distant is Keith Hall, the seat of the Earl of Kintore, 
modernized to make a comfortable residence. The first 
Earl was Sir John Keith, a son of the sixth Earl Marischal. 
He is said to have assisted in secreting and preserving the 
Scottish regalia, when the Castle of Dunnottar, to which they 
had been sent for safety, was besieged by a parliamentary 
force. His share in the transaction is not very clear, as the 
regalia, as is well known, were stealthily conveyed from the 
Castle by the wife of the minister pi Kinneff, assisted by her 
servant, and were buried by them under the pulpit of Kinneff 
Church. Sir John, however, was accused of conveying the 
jewels to France, and as he admitted the charge the search 
for the royal insignia was not further prosecuted. After the 
Restoration he was created Earl of Kintore and was put in 
possession of the lands of Keith Hall. 



THE VALE OF ALFORD 91 

Between the Don and the Urie, which meet at Inverurie, 
is a conical, flat-topped mound called the Bass of Inverurie, 
supposed to have been the site of an ancient castle. It is the 
subject of one of Thomas the Rhymer's prophecies, which 
says — 

" When Dee and Don run both in one, 
And Tweed shall run in Tay, 
Ye little river of Ury 
Shall bear ye Bass away." 

Westward rises the summit of Bennachie, a landmark from 
all the high ground of east and north-east Aberdeenshire. 

It was in the neighbourhood of Inverurie that Robert the 
Bruce overthrew his great rivals the Comyns. During a 
campaign against them, he was lying sick in Inverurie when 
he heard that his outposts had been driven in. At once he 
rose from his sick-bed to go to the field of battle, meeting 
the remonstrances of his followers with the assurance that 
the temporary success of his foes had driven away his illness. 
The fight ended in a complete victory for the Bruce, and 
though less noted in history than his successes over the 
English, it had great influence on the course of events. 

At Inverurie the main line leaves the valley of the Don and 
follows that of the Urie. 

THE VALE OF ALFORD. 

Leaving Kintore, where the river Don disappears for a 
time, the traveller passes through some rather uninteresting 
scenery to Kemnay, 4,\ miles from the junction. Here may 
be obtained, on the right, a good view of Fetternear, once 
the country seat of the Bishops of Aberdeen. A little short 
of the station the river again comes in sight. Near the 
village are extensive granite quarries. The stone is of a fine 
grey colour, and of excellent quality for building purposes. 
It was used for the Forth Bridge and the Thames Embank- 
ment. 

Almost due south of the station, and about three miles 
from it by road, is Castle Fraser, " one of the finest specimens 
of the Flemish style of architecture in Scotland." It is a very 
ancient building, but is in perfect repair. The walls of the 
more modern parts were erected, as is shown by the dates 
upon them, in the years 161 7 and 161 8, but a square tower 
to the west is believed to belong to the fifteenth century. 



92 THE VALE OF ALFORD 

Throughout the edifice the walls are from 6 to 10 feet thick. 
The whole stands upon arches. 

The next station is at Monymusk, three miles farther. 
Immediately to the north is Monymusk House, one of the 
finest places in the county. It is in the midst of an extensive 
park, through which flows the Don, and is sheltered by trees 
of great age and size. It dates from the Reformation, and 
the older portion is largely composed of the materials of a 
priory that stood near. The Parish Church of Monymusk is 
also said to have been built from the same source. 

Close by the high-road, at the farm of Nether Mains (about 
a mile and a half east of the village), is the Monymusk Stone, 
which bears a well-carved cross, and is supposed to have 
been a landmark on the Priory property. 

Rather more than a mile to the south is Cluny Castle, a seat 
of the Gordons. It is said to have been founded in the 
fifteenth century, but was rebuilt in 1836. It is an imposing 
structure. 

From Monymusk the Don makes a curve to the north, while 
the line sweeps round in the opposite direction, the two coming 
together again in the vicinity of Alford. 

The next station to Monymusk is Tillyfourie, the site of 
granite quarries. 

The line then passes between the Red Hill of Corrennie, 
a good two miles to the south-west, and a part of the Menaway 
range on the right, and enters the Howe, a fertile tract enclosed 
by hills. The mansion called Whitehouse, standing on the 
right, is passed shortly before reaching Whitehouse station. 

Nearly three miles to the north the Don is crossed by the 
high road, and just beyond the bridge there stands on the 
right Castle Forbes, close to the village of Keig. The site 
is beautifully wooded, and the Don passes through the 
grounds. " Rising immediately from the river, and sur- 
rounded by extensive woodlands, the lawn slopes gradually 
to its banks, and the view from the house, being uninter- 
rupted, is varied and extensive. The building is modern, in 
a castellated style of architecture,' and forms a striking and 
picturesque object from all points of the valley beneath." 
It was formerly called Putachie. 

Beyond Whitehouse the ruins of Balfluig Castle, built in 
1556, are passed on the left, about half a mile short of — 



ALFORD 93 

Alford. 

Angling. — The guests at the hotels can fish reserved portions of the Don. 

Bank. — North of Scotland and Town and County. 

Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Episcopal. 

Alford, the terminus of the Alford Valley section of the 
Great North of Scotland Railway, is a pleasant and compara- 
tively modern village in one of the most highly cultivated 
districts of Aberdeenshire. In the vicinity of the village are 
some fine stone circles. The upper valley of the river, Don- 
side, or Strathdon, as it is alternatively called, presents much 
delightful scenery, and the roads around Alford are ideal for 
cycling. 

The Three Rivers Tour to and from Tomintoul, Speyside and 
Deeside includes Alford, Kildrummy and Strathdon by motor-car. 

EXCURSIONS FROM ALFORD. 

To Terpersie or Dalspersie Castle, a small fortified house in 
a sequestered spot, about five miles to the north. It con- 
sists of three storeys with but one room in each. On one 
of the window-sills is the date 1561, and above is the Gordon 
crest — a boar's head. 

Craigievar Castle, in a fine situation about six miles to the 
south, is generally shown on application. It is seven storeys 
high, and is a capital example of the Flemish Castellated 
style. The hall has a particularly fine roof and a huge fire- 
place. Over the staircase is a coat of arms with the date 1668 
and the injunction " Doe not vaiken sleiping dogs." Much 
of the furniture belongs to former centuries. " In few places 
in the kingdom can so accurate a comparison be drawn 
between the rough garniture of the baronial castles of former 
times and the comfort combined with elegance of modern 
decoration." 

Kildrummy Castle, on the north bank of the Don, ten 
miles west of Alford. Interesting from its connection with 
the old kings of Scotland and the history of Bruce. It was 
besieged by Edward I in 1306, and on obtaining possession he 
cruelly put to death Bruce's youngest brother, who had 
gallantly defended it, as graphically described in Barbour's 
great poem. Unfortunately the greatest ruin has overtaken 
the parts that were finest. The most ancient, most import- 
ant, and noblest portion of the castle was the Snow Tower, 
which stood at the north-west corner of the quadrangle, and 
that has suffered more than any other part. The eastern 
front of the castle, including the towers, is 180 feet in length, 



94 EXCURSIONS FROM ALFORD 

while the northern is nearly half as long again. The date 
of foundation of the castle is uncertain, and the earliest 
authentic record of additions and alterations has reference 
to the building of seven towers by St. Gilbert, Bishop of 
Caithness, in the reign of Alexander II. 

To Aboyne, on the Dee, 18 miles nearly due south. The 
route passes near Craigievar Castle, and not far beyond that 
joins the main road from Aberdeen. This must be followed 
westward to Tarland, a village some six miles to the north- 
west of Aboyne. About a mile from the junction of the 
Alford road, the Aberdeen road passes Corse House on the 
right and the ruins of Corse Castle, the latter dating from 
1581. At Tarland the road turns sharp to the left and passes 
near the ruins of Coull Castle, situated on a rocky eminence 
near Coull Church. 

Alford to Tomintoul and Ballindalloch. 

From near Alford a pleasant road runs along the north 
bank of the Don. At the old toll of Mossat it joins the main 
road from Gartly station, turning to the left to Kildrummy. 
Thence the road lies through the narrow sylvan Den of 
Kildrummy, and the Deeside height of Morven (p. 70) is seen 
ahead. About 12 miles from Alford is the Glenkindie Arms 
Inn, not far from Towie Castle, the scene of the pathetic 
Scottish ballad Edom 0' Gordon, if it was the castle burnt by 
Adam Gordon, brother of the Earl of Huntly, in 1571, when 
the wife and children of Alexander Forbes, its owner, perished 
in the flames. 

The Kindy Water is crossed, and not far beyond is Glen- 
kindie House. In the second field on the right beyond that 
is a Picts' House containing two chambers. A little farther 
westward the road crosses the mouth of the Bucket, which 
flows for seven miles down a wild glen, in which are 
Badenyon, famous in song, and Glenbucket Castle, the latter 
built in the sixteenth century, and situated near the 
main road. 

In the next three miles there are first the farm of Buchaam, 
with a Picts' House in the garden, and then Castle Newe. 
About two miles beyond the latter Strathdon is entered. 
One of its objects of interest to visitors is Colquhonny Castle, 
in ruins. Indeed, the Castle is said nev«r to have been com- 
pleted, because during its construction three of the lairds fell 
from the top and were killed. Hard by is the Doune of 
Invernochty, a once fortified mound. The road rises rapidly, 




Valentine & Sons, Ltd.,] 



[Dundee. 



CRAIGIEVAR CASTLE. 




Valentine & Sons, Ltd.,] 



CORSE CASTLE. 



[Dundee. 



TOMINTOUL 95 

and passes Corgarff Castle, which contests with Towie the 
repute of the tragedy of the Forbes family and household 
in 1571. 

At Cock Bridge, 1,400 feet above sea-level, is the Allargue 
Hotel, for which its proprietor claims the distinction of being 
the highest permanently inhabited hotel in Scotland. 

Cock Bridge to Ballater (13 miles). A rough hilly carriage- 
road running in a fairly straight line. The route is described 
in the reverse direction in connection with Ballater (p. 72).- 

Cock Bridge to Braemar (23 miles) via Inchrory, which is 
situated in the valley of the Avon, six miles to the west of 
Cock Bridge, and is reached by following the road that runs 
close to the south side of the Don. The road from Inchrory 
Lodge to Braemar is described in the reverse direction on 
p. 86. 

Motor-cars run daily during the tourist season between New 
Hotel, Strathdon, and Dinnet and Ballater in connection with the 
Three Rivers Tour. 

At Cock Bridge the road leaves the Don and goes north- 
ward across the Lecht into Banffshire, at a height of 2,048 
feet. Five miles farther (37 from Alford) it reaches — 



Tomintoul. 

Angling. — Parts of the Avon, which affords fair salmon fishing and good trouting, 
and of the Conglass, which has plenty of small trout and sometimes a few 
salmon, can be fished by residents. There is excellent trout fishing in 
seven streams within easy access of the village. 

Bank. — North of Scotland and Town and County. 

Golf. — A g-hole course ; fee for the season, ios. 6d. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Motor-car service, daily, July to September, to Ballindalloch (15 miles), where 
is the nearest railway station ; also at stated times to Grantown-on-Spey. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free and Roman Catholic. 

Public Library. 

Tomintoul is the highest village of any size in Scotland and is 
probably farther from the sea than any other village in the 
country. It stands on a tableland overlooking the Avon, at an 
elevation of 1,161 feet above sea-level, being about 25 feet 
higher than Braemar. As it has a bracing air, is exceedingly 
healthy, is surrounded by fine scenery, and is in a district 
abounding with trout streams, it is a growing favourite with 
holiday-makers, and accommodation at the hotels and in the 
houses and cottages is booked up quite early in the year. 
In the neighbourhood are most delightful walks and drives. 



96 GLENLIVET 

Tomintoul to Ballindalloch. 

The road descends the pleasant wooded valley of the Avon, 
passing the mouth of Glenlivet, best known for its distillery, 
but of historical interest as the scene of a fierce battle in 1594 
between two Scottish forces, one being commanded by the 
Earl of Huntly, the other by the Earl of Argyle. The Earl 
of Huntly, having murdered the " Bonnie Earl of Moray " 
and entered on an attempt to overthrow the Protestant cause, 
the King commissioned Moray's brother-in-law, the boy- 
Earl of Argyle, to bring him to account, but the avenging 
army was defeated with a loss of 500 men, while the loss on 
the other side was trifling. 

Farther down the stream Ballindalloch Castle (see p. 105) 
is passed. 



STRATHSPEY. 

CRAIGELLACHIE — ABERLOUR — BALLINDALLOCH — GRANTOWN — 
NETHYBRIDGE— BOAT OF GARTEN— AVIEMORE. 

STRATHSPEY is the delightful and extensive district 
through which the Spey flows below the " Stand Fast 
Craigellachie " Rock, near Aviemore, to another rock called 
Craigellachie, at the village of the same name. Like Bade- 
noch, or Upper Speyside, it is rapidly increasing in favour 
with tourists, and most deservedly so. Accessibility by rail, 
a salubrious climate, wonderful scenery, streams and rivers 
for anglers and mountains for climbers are among its posses- 
sions. To none of these are holiday-makers ever indifferent. 
In combination their attractiveness is irresistible. 

The air of Strathspey is pure and bracing, and the climate 
is remarkably dry, the clouds both from the north and the 
south-west being exhausted by the mountains that intercept 
their course. But the mountains do not closely hem in the 
chief centres of population. On the contrary, there is a 
wide sweep of open country around the principal settlements. 

Briefly expressed, the scenic beauties of the district are 
diversified and picturesque landscapes, grand and imposing 
mountain scenery within easy reach, and some of the best 
lake scenery in the Northern Highlands. In relation to 
health, the merits of Strathspey are summed up in the words 
of Sir Andrew Clark, the famous physician, " It is the sana- 
torium of the British Isles." 

The Spey 

takes its rise in a small loch some sixteen miles from Fort 
Augustus and at a height of 1,143 feet above sea-level. Its 
outlet is on the Moray coast. It is 98 miles long, and, in 
point of length, is the second river in Scotland. It flows at 
some parts with great impetuosity and was, in consequence, 
at one time reckoned the most rapid of Scottish rivers ; but 
Aberdeen (g) 97 



98 STRATHSPEY 

it has no falls, nor anything worth the name of a rapid, and 
in its middle reaches it is always slow and often sluggish. 

The breadth of the Spey when unflooded varies very little. 
On an average, below Grantown, it is perhaps mostly confined 
within 70 or 80 yards, with a depth of about 3 feet. This, 
of course, is speaking generally, for there are fords on Spey 
which a man may cross on foot when the water is very low, 
and there are pots in the river nearly 30 feet deep. 

The Spey is the wildest and most capricious of all the large 
rivers of Scotland, its alternations of emptiness and flood 
being more complete and more sudden than those of any 
other Scottish stream. 

As a salmon river,, the Spey takes high rank. It also 
contains both sea and river trout, eels, pike, finnocks or 
whitling, and in that part of it known as Loch Insh there are 
char. Further particulars are given on succeeding pages in 
connection with the holiday resorts on the banks of the river. 

Access By Rail. 

Strathspey is served both by the Highland Railway and 
the Great North of Scotland Railway. The former touches it 
at Aviemore, Boat of Garten, Broomhill (for Nethybridge), 
and Grantown. 

On the Great North of Scotland line there are stations at 
Craigellachie, Aberlour, Carron, Knockando, Blacksboat, 
Ballindalloch, Advie, Cromdale, Grantown, Nethybridge and 
Boat of Garten. 

TO SPEYSIDE FROM ABERDEEN. 

Speyside is reached from Aberdeen by the main line of the 
Great North of Scotland Railway, which runs through Dyce, 
Kintore and Inverurie. As far as the last-named place the 
route has been described on preceding pages. 

As the journey is continued from Inverurie there comes 
into view on the left the Mither Tap, the most remarkable 
in appearance of the six peaks of<Bennachie (bennahee). It 
is 1,698 feet above sea-level, and is surmounted by a cairn. 
All the six summits of the ridge, which extends for 4 \ miles, 
command an extensive view. Oxen Cruig, the loftiest, has 
a height of 1,733 feet. Though the mountain presents a 
perpendicular face to the line, from the south-east side the 
ascent is easy. It is generally attacked from Pitcaple, 05'ne, 



INVERAMSAY 99 

or Insch, the last-named being considered the best point. 
Readers of Sir Walter Scott will remember that Bennachie 
is mentioned in a ballad in The Antiquary as looking down 
on the battlefield of Harlaw, so intimately connected with 
the story of Aberdeen. The site is situated a short distance 
east of the next station, Inveramsay, 21 miles from Aber- 
deen, and is marked by a memorial 44 feet high, erected by 
the Aberdeen Town Council in 1911, the quincentenary of 
the battle. Donald, Prince of the Isles, landed in Ross- 
shire, and at the head of a great horde of Highlanders was 
rapidly advancing southward, leaving havoc and desolation 
behind him and looking forward to the pillage of Aberdeen. 
His force far outnumbered the lowland band that confronted 
him at Harlaw and victory was long in the balance. The fall 
of the Highland prince turned the scale in favour of the low- 
landers, as the invaders then began to retreat. 

" And when they saw that he was deid, 
They turned and ran awa', 

♦ * * * * 

They rode, they ran, and some did gang, 

They were of sraa' record, 
For Forbes and his merry men 

Slew maist all by the road." 

So says an old ballad that continued to be sung in the 
district until the middle of the nineteenth century, and though 
it may exaggerate the duration of the fight, it probably does 
not magnify the slaughter. It thus concludes — 

" On Munonday at morning 

The battle it began : 

On Saturday at gloaming 

Ye'd scarce telt wha had wan. 

And sic a weary burying, 

The like ye never saw, 
As there was the Sunday after that, 

On the muir down by Harlaw. 

And if Hielan' lasses spier at ye 

For them that gaed awa', 
Ye may tell them plain, and plain enough, 

They're sleeping at Harlaw." 

From Inveramsay station the Banff and Macduff section 
runs almost due north, while the main line continues in a 
north-westerly direction to Pitcaple, from which place the 
route to Bennachie passes the Maiden Stone, a relic of ancient 



100 DUNNIDEER— TAP O' NOTH 

days, standing ten feet high, and having on its sides sculp- 
tured figures. 

Prom Pitcaple the line continues to Oyne and Insch. This 
part of the route is through the heart of the Garioch (pro- 
nounced " Geery," the " G " hard), one of the ancient terri- 
torial divisions of Aberdeenshire, celebrated for its exceeding 
fertility. On the right are the beautiful woods encompassing 
the house of Logie. 

The village of Insch lies in a cosy situation about a mile 
north of the station. Beyond it rise the Culsalmond and 
Foudland Hills. The most prominent height is the Hill of 
Tillymorgan. Near the village is Newton House, " the loca- 
tion of the famous Newton Stone, bearing two inscriptions, 
one in the Ogham character (so it is conjectured) and the 
other in Greek — various and conflicting are the attempted 
renderings." 

Just beyond Insch, on the right, is the hill of Dunnideer, 
rising like a pyramid in the midst of the plain. It is about 
600 feet high, and is surmounted by a piece of ragged wall 
composed of the strongest masonry, probably part of a fort, 
one of a chain protecting this portion of the country. Facing 
Dunnideer on the left is the hill of Christ's Kirk, supposed 
to be the place referred to in the old poem Christ's Kirk on 
the Green, ascribed to King James the Fifth. 

As the line proceeds it gets more among the hills. Stations 
are passed at Wardhouse and Kennethmont, and leaving 
the Garioch, the line enters the old territorial division of 
Strathbogie. Appioaching Gartly (35J miles), there is on 
the left a fine view of the Tap 0' Noth (1,851 feet). 

" On the summit is the most remarkable specimen of a 
Vitrified Fort, either as to altitude, extent of area, or preserva- 
tion, extant in Great Britain. The vitrified wall measures 
in some places eight feet from the ground. To this must be 
added the height lost by the accumulation of soil and rubbish, 
and the fallen courses of dry masonry which had raised it 
to its total altitude. The thickness of the wall appears to 
have been about 20 feet. The vitrification must have been 
produced by extreme heat, and in every part of the rampart 
portions of the stone are converted into a glazed substance." 

Those who examine the remains of the fort might extend 
their ramble to Craig Castle, situated in a beautiful spot 
seven miles south-west of Gartly station. It stands on the 
edge of a deep and narrow gorge, through which the Bum of 
Craig flows in a series of delightful cataracts. The original 



CRAIG CASTLE— KEITH 101 

tower was founded in 1510, by Patrick Gordon, the first of 
Craig, who fell at Flodden three years later. 

" From one of the upper floors a narrow, dark passage is 
said to terminate in a well, having an outlet down in the den, 
and tradition asserts that this was a handy way of getting 
rid of tale-telling bodies of slain men. One room was long 
observed to be much lower in the roof than the other rooms 
on the same floor, and the proprietor, sounding over it, found 
that it seemed hollow over an oriel window. Tearing down 
the modern plaster, he discovered a trap-door which led to a 
concealed chamber that was largely filled with decaying 
human remains." 

The next station to Gartly is at the delightful town of 
Huntly, 41 miles from Aberdeen, described on pp. 1 19-123. 

Beyond is Rothiemay and then comes Cairnie Junction, 
from which a line goes off north-eastward to Banff and other 
places on the Moray Firth Coast. Continuing westward, 
the next station is at Grange, which took its name from the 
home-farm of the monks of Kinloss. On the right is Braco . 
Farther westward are Keith and Keith Town stations, only 
a mile apart. 

Keith 

is an important business centre of Banffshire and consists of 
three towns, Keith, Fife Keith and Newmill. An architectural 
feature is a Roman Catholic Chapel with two colossal figures 
of St. Peter and St. Paul surmounting the pediment. In 
the interior is an altar-piece presented by Charles X of France. 

In 1650 the churchyard of Old Keith was the scene of the 
unmanly railing of the parish minister at the fallen Marquis 
of Montrose, who was compelled to attend the service in the 
ragged and unkempt condition in which he was captured. 
Fifty years later it was the scene of the apprehension of that 
noted freebooter, James Macpherson, by Duff of Braco. 
The freebooter and his band were plundering the people 
at Keith Fair when he was attacked by Braco. He re- 
treated into the churchyard, where he tripped over a tomb- 
stone and was made prisoner. The manner in which he 
faced his execution at Banff will be recalled by lovers of 
Burns, the poet having given him immortality in a fine 
ballad containing the lines — 

" Sae rantingly, sae wantonly, 
Sae dauntingly gaed he ; 
He played a spring an' danced it round, 
Below the gallows tree." 



1 02 DUFFTOWN 

Near the churchyard of Fife Keith may be seen the Gaun 
Pot, or Pool, in which witches were drowned. Good baskets 
of trout are taken from the Isla, which flows past Keith and 
is open to strangers. 

Keith is a terminus of the Highland Railway, which gives 
it direct connection with Elgin and Inverness, and a branch 
of the Highland line connects it also with Buckie, on the 
Moray Firth Coast. 

The Great North of Scotland line sweeps on through an 
agricultural district to Auchindachy, thence through more 
interesting scenery to Drummuir, and onwards through a 
still more picturesque district to — 

Dufftown. 

Angling. — In the Fiddich. 

Banks. — North of Scotland and Town and County and Commercial. 

'Buses meet the principal trains (fare, is). The station is about a mile from the 

town. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Golf. — A 9-hole course. Visitors' fees : Week, 55. ; month, 10s. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 
Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Episcopal, Roman 

Catholic. 
Post Office. — Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. 
Recreation. — Tennis courts and bowling green, golf, angling. 

Dufftown is beautifully situated in the valley of the Fiddich, 
a tributary of the Spey, and is famous for its distilleries, of 
which it has no fewer than seven. The town takes its name 
from the family name of its founder, the fourth Earl of Fife. 
It is well laid out, and a number of houses have been built 
in recent years. It is yearly growing in favour with visitors 
on account of its pure and bracing air, the many charming 
walks, views, and drives in the vicinity, and the large number 
of places of interest, archaeological and otherwise, within 
easy reach. 

Between the station and the town may be seen, in a 
clump of trees standing back on the left, the ruins of Balvenie 
Castle, said to be of Danish origin. It was a residence of the 
terrible Wolf of Badenoch, the destroyer of Elgin Cathedral. 
Its various owners also included the Stewarts of Athole, and 
the motto of their house — Furth Fortuin and fil the Fattris — 
is inscribed on a scroll on the front of the building. A new 
Balvenie Castle was built, about half a mile distant, by the 
first Earl of Fife, but was never quite finished. It stands 
between Dufftown station and the river Fiddich, and serves 
as a granary to a distillery. 



EXCURSIONS FROM DUFFTOWN 103 

Dufftown was the birthplace of Lord Mount Stephen, 
the Canadian peer. 

Half a mile south of the town is Mortlach Church, enlarged 
by Malcolm II, who here engaged in a great battle with 
the Danes. Tradition says that as the Scots were being 
overcome Malcolm vowed that if victorious he would add 
three spear-lengths to the church close by. A Runic stone 
commemorates his triumph, and what is said to be the mark 
of his spear is shown on the wall of the church. 

A mile from the church is the Giant's Chair, a kind of 
natural seat overlooking the Dullan, and approached by a 
path alongside the stream. About a hundred yards from 
the chair is a basin in the rock called the Cradle. The scenery 
in the neighbourhood is very pleasing. 

Two and a half miles to the south-east of Dufftown are 
the ruins of Auchindoun Castle. It was the seat from which 
Sir Adam Gordon set out for the burning of the Castle recorded 
in the ballad, Edom o' Gordon. In 1670, Auchindoun itself 
was burnt to the ground by the chief of the Mackintoshes, 
in revenge for some real or fancied wrong, and the sequel was 
his own execution. 

Up one of the glens that converge on Dufftown, making 
it both important and attractive, is Ben Rinnes (2,755 feet). 
The distance to the summit is 7 miles. The ascent presents 
no difficulty. The descent may be made to Aberlour, nearly 
7 miles to the station, or to Ballindalloch station, 8 miles. 

Another of the glens leads to Loch Park, a long narrow 
sheet of water near the source of the Isla. It is shut in by 
wooded heights and is as lovely as it is lonely. 

A third glen takes the Fiddich, the high-road and the rail- 
way down to the Spey. It has romantic scenery all the 
way, and has been classed among the most beautiful in Scot- 
land. It is broad and has hills rising gently all around. 
Above and beyond the farms on the lower slopes " brown 
heath and shaggy wood " meet the sky. There seems to be 
no escape from the valley but over the mountain tops. On 
one side are the Convals, two dome-shaped heights, with 
Ben Rinnes standing like a giant on their farther end ; on 
the other side are the Hills of Glenfiddich and Balloch, while 
Ben Aigan, in front, completes the shutting in of the view. 
At the head of the glen is Kininvie House, said to have been 
visited by King James V in the guise of a gaberlunzie-man. 
Farther down are the ruins of Gauldwell Castle, in which 



104 CRAIGELLACHIE— ABERLOUR 

Edward I is said to have spent a night. At the foot of the 
glen is — 

Craigellachie. 

Angling. — In the Fiddick and the Spey, by permission. 

Church. — Established Church. 

Hotel. — See Introduction. 

Distances. — By road: Archiestown, 4! miles; Elgin, 13; Fochabers, 12; 

Mulben Station, 6| ; Orton, 6§ ; Rothes, 3. 
Post Office. — Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. 

Craigellachie occupies a charming situation on a slight 
eminence overlooking the Spey at the spot where it is" joined 
by the Fiddich. Here, too, that river makes a grand sweep 
round the base of Ben Aigan (1,544 feet), which affords an 
extensive view. The Spey is crossed by a massive and pic- 
turesque iron bridge. It was designed by Telford, and at 
each end are round embattled towers. The farther side of 
the bridge abuts upon the lofty precipitous rock called 
Craigellachie, which forms the boundary in this direction of 
Strathspey, as the more famous Craigellachie Rock, near 
Aviemore, marks the southern end of the Glen. Along the 
face of the rock the road is cut. In both directions the valley 
is extremely lovely, and many delightful walks and excur- 
sions may be made along it and in the surrounding district. 

At Craigellachie passengers for Speyside leave the direct 
line which runs north-westward to Elgin, Forres, Nairn and 
Inverness. 

Leaving Craigellachie Junction, the Strathspey line runs 
between the high-road and the right (or south) bank of the 
Spey, and in a little over two miles reaches — 

Aberlour. 

Banks. — North of Scotland and Town and County, Union Bank of Scotland. 

Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Hotels. — Aberlour, GUnmoray (temp.). 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Episcopal, Roman 

Catholic. 
Population. — 1,272. 

Post Office. — Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays (telegrams only), 9 to ro a.m. 
Recreation. — Fishing, bowling, tennis. 

Aberlour is a long, straggling village on the south bank 

of the Spey. It has wide, airy streets and a spacious square. 

It dates only from 1812, when a number of feus of 4 acres 

were granted. The houses now, however, are nearly all 

modern structures. Among prominent buildings are an 

Episcopal Orphanage, the Fleming Hall and the Fleming 

Hospital. 



ABERLOUR— BALLINDALLOCH 105 

From the village there is a magnificent view of Ben Rinnes, 
the summit of which is nearly 7 miles from the station. 

About a mile up the Burn of Aberlour is the Linn of Ruthrie, 
a cataract 25 feet high. It is a pretty spot much in favour 
with picnic parties. 

In the neighbourhood of the village also is Aberlour House, 
a modern building in the Grecian-Doric style ; " all that 
landscape gardening can do to give beauty and variety has 
been brought to bear on the grounds and policies." 

In a wall of the old house of Aberlour there was found a letter 
dated from Dalnacardoch and running as follows : " My dear Gor- 
don, I am to be at . . . and trust to see you there, with as many 
men as you can raise to rally round the Royal Standard. I am, 
yours faithfully, Chas. E. Stuart." 

It is a short run from Aberlour to Carron, where the line 
crosses the Spey and the most magnificent reach of the river 
begins. From the carriage windows on the left the river 
may be seen flowing in broad sweeps and through birch-clad 
gorges. On the north side of the Spey the line comes first 
to Knockando and then to Blacksboat station, which owes 
its curious name to the spot having been the site of a ferry. 
Near Inveravon Church, on the opposite bank, was a ford 
which in ancient times was used by many a pilgrim on the 
way to St. Peter's Well, famed for its healing power. 

Still amid beautiful scenery, the line goes on to — 

Ballindalloch, 

where passengers alight for the village of Tomintoul (see p. 95), 
included in the Three Rivers Tour. During the season the 
Railway Company maintain a daily service of motor-cars 
between Ballindalloch and Tomintoul. 

Near Ballindalloch the Spey is joined by the Avon (or 
A'an), a river so pellucid as to give rise to the couplet: 

"The water o' A'an it rins sae clear, 
'T would begnile a man o' a hunder year." 

On the right bank of the Avon is Ballindalloch Castle, the 
entrance to the grounds being about two miles from the 
station. This entrance is a very attractive object. The gate 
fills the space between a steep rock and the end of the para- 
pet wall of a bridge over the river. Over the keystone of the 
arch above it are the family arms and the motto, " Touch 
not the cat bot a glove," i.e., without a glove. 



106 BALLINDALLOCH 

The avenue leading to the castle is about a mile long. On 
one side is a rugged and precipitous bank and on the other 
the river Avon. 

The castle is considered one of the finest specimens of 
Baronial architecture in the north of Scotland. The original 
building was a square tower, flanked by three circular towers, 
but large additions have been made from time to time. The 
central of the three towers is the largest, and contains the 
ancient doorway and a spiral staircase. It is surmounted 
by a watch tower called the cap-house, said to have been 
added in 1602. Just above the entrance is an aperture 
through which boiling tar or molten lead might be poured 
upon an attacking party. Over the doorway also are the 
arms of the Macpherson- Grants — the family in occupation — 
and on the lintel is the inscription : " Ye Lord shall preserve 
thy going out and thy coming in," with "Erected 1546 " 
on one side, and " Restored 1850 " on the other. 

Four miles farther up the Avon is the mouth of the Livet, 
and the entrance to Glenlivet, previously noticed. 

At Ballindalloch the line again crosses the Spey, returning 
to its south bank, and the scenery changes, becoming in- 
creasingly wilder and more Highland. About 2 miles from 
Advie, and on the opposite side of the river, is Tulchan Lodge, 
frequently visited by King Edward and King George as the 
guests of the late Sir Edward Sassoon. 

Beyond Advie the river valley becomes much wider, and 
birch and fir woods stretch away from the cultivated low- 
lying land by the riverside to the more distant -hills. Then 
on the left, shortly before reaching Cromdale station, lie 
the Haughs of Cromdale, on which, after the battle of Killie- 
crankie, the Jacobites were surprised and routed. The affair 
was made the subject of a ballad commencing — ■ 

" As I cam' in by Auchindoun, 
A little wee bit frae the toun, 
When to the Heilan's I was boun, 

To view the Haughs o' Cromdale, 
I met a man in tartan trews ; 
I speered at him what \vas the news. 
Quo' he, ' The Heilan ' army rues 

That e'er they cam' to Cromdale.' " 

Soon after passing Cromdale there comes into view in the 
woods on the right Castle Grant, the ancient seat of the 
chiefs of Grant. Not far beyond it is — 



GRANTOWN 107 

Grantown. 

Access. — By the Great North of Scotland Railway or by the Highland Railway. 

The G.N.S. station is ij miles from the centre of the town; the Highland 

station is about half as far away. Hotel 'buses meet the trains. There 

are through carriages on some of the trains from the South. 
Angling. — Permits for salmon and trout fishing in the Spey are issued by the 

Grantown and District Angling Association. 
Banks. — National, Royal, Bank of Scotland. 
Baths. — Victoria Institute, High Street. 
Bowls. — A green adjoins the golf courses. 
Distances. — By rail : Aberdeen, 92 miles ; Edinburgh, 144 ; Glasgow, 159 ; 

Inverness, 48 ; London, 534 ; Perth, 96. By road : Aberlour, 21$ miles ; 

Aviemore, 15 ; Ballindalloch, 13 ; Boat of Garten, 8 ; Carr Bridge, 10 ; 

Forres, 22 ; Inverness, 33 ; Nairn, 23 ; Nethybridge, 6 ; Tomintoul. 14. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 
Golf. — An 18-hole course. The first tee is within five minutes' walk of 

the centre of the town. There is an excellent club-house, where light 

refreshments can be obtained. Visitors' fees : Day, is. ; week, 6s. ; 

fortnight, 10s. ; month, 15s. ; season, £1 is. od. There is also a 

ladies' course, but ladies may play at all hours on the gentlemen's course ; 

charges as for gentlemen. Boys may play only on the ladies' course. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Free, Baptist, Episcopal. 
Post Office. — In High Street, nearly opposite the Palace Hotel. Week-days, 

8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. There is also an office at the 

G.N.S. Station. 
Tennis. — There are capital courts adjoining the golf courses. 

Grantown (occasionally designated Grantown-on-Spey, to 
distinguish it from Granton, near Edinburgh) is in full view 
of the station on the Highland line, but cannot be seen from 
the Great North of Scotland line by reason of the wooded 
rising ground that intervenes. 

From the G.N.S. station, which is by the bridge over the 
Spey, it is a pleasant walk to the town. The telegraph wires 
are followed along the main road by the river-side for some 
distance, and a road through a wood is then taken, this latter 
road entering the town about the centre of High Street. 

The town stands in Morayshire, upon a plateau having an 
elevation of 712 feet above sea-level. On the south side 
the site slopes gently to the Spey, while on the opposite side 
there is a valley separating it from the mountains that shelter 
it from northern storms. 

Looking south, the grandest feature of the landscape is 
the Cairngorm range, about 12 or 14 miles distant in a 
direct line, while to the right and left the valley of the Spey 
is seen for many miles, with all its varied sylvan and romantic 
scenery. 

The town takes its name from its founder, Sir James Grant, 
and is a comparatively modern place, the first houses having 
been erected in 1766. It runs parallel with the Spey, and 



108 GRANTOWN 

has been built on regular lines. In the centre is a spacious 
Square, with rows of trees on each side, and containing the 
principal public buildings. From each end of the Square 
broad streets extend. The buildings are mainly of granite, 
and the whole place is clean and well-kept and wears an air 
of prosperity. Electric light is used in the streets and 
in many of the houses and shops. 

Grantown is an excellent centre for walks, drives and rail- 
way excursions. It has a bracing climate, the salubrity of 
which is increased by the presence of extensive pine-woods. 
It stands on gravelly soil, and has an abundant supply of 
good water. The average rainfall for twenty years is given 
as 32 inches. With its many advantages as a place of resi- 
dence, there is no room for wonder that as a Highland 
health and pleasure resort it rivals Ballater and Braemar. 

The vogue of the place dates from the incognito visit of 
Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in i860. An amusing 
account of some of the incidents of the visit was given in Her 
Majesty's Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands. 
Since that event Grantown has become so favourite a place 
of resort that during the height of the summer every house 
in the town and every farmhouse in the vicinity is occupied 
by visitors, the more prudent of whom engage their quarters 
early in the year. 

At the head of an avenue proceeding from the Square is 
the parish church, known as the Seafield Memorial Church. 
It was erected by Lady Seafield in memory of her husband 
and son, and was opened in 1886. One of the most interest- 
ing features of the interior is the pulpit, which is mainly con- 
structed of ancient wood-carvings. Another is a piece of 
carved woodwork in front of the Seafield gallery. 

It was discovered during the demolition of an old house at 
Duthil, in 1874, and is thought to have formed part of a pew in the 
old church of Duthil. Upon it are three rows of panels. The 
uppermost are eight in number, each containing the arms of a 
Highland family. Under them is inscribed : 

" Mark the upright man, "and behold the just, 
For the end of that man is peace." 
The middle row also consists of eight panels. They display 
floral and figure designs and are followed by the words : 

"The righteous cry, and the Lord heareth them, 
And delivereth them out of all their troubles." 
In the lowest row there are only seven panels, and the designs 
in them are less elaborate than those above. 



CASTLE GRANT 109 

Beyond the northern end of the town, and near the entrance 
to the Castle grounds, stands the Ian Charles Cottage Hospital, 
named after the eighth earl, who, in conjunction with his 
mother, erected and endowed it. 

EXCURSIONS FROM GRANTOWN. 

Castle Grant. The castle is approached by the north road 
from the Square, from which it is 2 miles distant. It is the 
ancient seat of the chiefs of the Clan Grant, the Earls of Sea- 
field, but the seventh Earl and his son, who succeeded him, 
broke the entail, and the eighth earl, who died in 1884, l ei t 
the estates to his mother. Since then there have been land- 
less chiefs of Grant and Earls of Seafield, but the Dowager 
Countess justified her possession by planting extensive woods 
and in other ways improving the territory. She died in 191 1. 

During the summer of 1920 a great fire destroyed hundreds 
of acres of woodland on the estate. 

The entrance to the grounds is by an imposing gateway 
and lodge, from which proceeds a beautiful avenue. On the 
right is a much admired view of the Cromdale Hills. On the 
west side of the Castle is a very fine lime-tree avenue. 

Although the Castle stands on a high terrace it is so thickly 
surrounded by forests of pine, oak, elm, and chestnut, that 
only the upper part of the tower is visible to the railway 
passenger who is carried past it, and for the same reason it 
does not come into sight of the approaching visitor until it is 
nearly reached. 

Queen Victoria called the Castle, in her Journal, " a very 
plain-looking house, like a factory," and that description 
exactly fits it. The principal entrance is on the north side. 
The south front, four storeys high, is the most modern part. 
The oldest portion is a picturesque tower bearing the name 
of Comyn, and dating from the fifteenth century. The name 
is accounted for by the fact that the Castle was in the posses- 
sion of the Comyns before the Grants became "Lords of 
Strathspey. 

In the entrance hall is a collection of mediaeval weapons. 
There are broadswords and targets, a musket and bayonet 
bearing the date 1434, and, in the roof, a rosette of real 
Scottish spears, the weapons with which — 

"The stubborn spearmen still made good 
Their dark impenetrable wood, 
Each stepping where his comrade stood 
The moment that he fell." 

On the walls of the dining-hall, as well as of other rooms, are 
pictures by Vandyke, Guido, Rubens, Poussin, and other 
famous artists. 



110 WALKS FROM GRANTOWN 

A flight of 144 stone steps leads to the roof of the Castle, 
from which is gained a magnificent view of the valley of the 
Spey, the forest of Abernethy, and the Cairngorm Mountains. 

Visitors who do not desire to return at once to Grantown 
may leave the park at a lodge situated at the spot where the 
railway crosses the road, or at a point half a mile farther 
north, and a mile and a half short of the spot at which the 
main road is left by visitors to Lord Huntly's Cave. 

Lord Huntly's Cave (3J miles). Follow the Forres road 
past the Castle Grant gateway until just beyond the third 
milestone. There take a footpath on the right, guarded by 
a stile. This path leads to the glen, at the bottom of which, 
on the left-hand side, is a cave. It derives its name from a 
tradition that it was the hiding-place of the second Marquis 
of Huntly, who espoused the cause of Charles I, but fled 
at the approach of his brother-in-law, the Earl of Argyll, 
commander-in-chief of the Scottish forces. 

The return to Grantown may be made by following the 
path down the glen for about a mile and then taking a by- 
road on the right that joins the main road some two miles 
north of the town. 

View Point. An excursion occupying an hour or an hour 
and a half and involving only a moderate hill climb. The 
route leaves the town at the east end and after half a mile 
turns to the left under Scorancheek Railway Bridge. The 
return can be made by Dhulach Bridge. The View Point has 
been enhanced by the erection of a useful Mountain Indicator. 

The Ladies' Walk. This is about half a mile from the 
town. It lies through a wood on an eminence overlooking 
the Spey, and commands some of the most charming views 
in the vicinity of Grantown. From the town it is approached 
by way of Spey Avenue, opposite the Royal Bank. When 
the river is reached the route lies through a wicket gate on 
the right. The walk may be included in the route of those 
passing to or from the Great North of Scotland station. 

Inverallan Churchyard, on the left bank of the Spey, ij 
miles above the town. It formerly contained the Parish 
Church. The direct road to it is through the wood below 
the Highland Railway station and then by the second turning 
on the left. About the centre of the area is an ancient memo- 
rial called St. Figat's Stone and also the Priest's Stone. On 
each side is a rudely sculptured Latin Cross. 

Dreggie Hill (1,250 feet). The route passes Inverallan 
Manse, goes under the railway and then to the left for a short 
distance ; then turns to the right for Dreggie farmhouse, 
behind which the hill rises. A well-defined path runs past 
Gorton farmhouse to the summit, from which all the chief 
heights of the Cairngorm range may be distinguished. 



EXCURSIONS FROM GRANTOWN 111 

Glen Beg and Ben More. Follow the Dulnain road (it lies 
to the left of the Highland station) for about a mile. There 
turn to the right at the Allan Burn, pass under the railway, 
and thence up the Glen. The road ends at the buildings of 
Glen Beg farm, about i£ miles from the railway. Thence 
a path on the left leads to the summit of Ben More (1,545 
feet), commanding one of the finest views in the district. On 
one hand is the valley of the Spey, from Ben Rinnes north- 
ward to the Cairngorm range southward ; on the other hand 
is the valley of the Dulnain. 

Cromdale (3 miles). The objects of interest are beech 
trees in the churchyard, planted in 1726 ; the Haughs of 
Cromdale, already mentioned ; and the ruins of Lethendrie 
Castle. 

Dulnain Bridge (3 miles) ; Muekeraeh Castle (4) ; Duthil 
(7) ; and Carr Bridge (10). 

The route runs from the southern end of the town, and for 
about i£ miles lies between the Highland Railway and the 
Spey. Then the road passes under the line, and after skirting 
Gaich Wood comes to Dulnain Bridge, a charming spot, 
where the brawling stream, which next to the Avon is the 
largest tributary of the Spey, rushes along its deep rocky 
bed. 

The road continues on the north side of the river, and half 
a mile from the bridge passes Muekeraeh House, and a little 
farther, on the same side of the road, are the ruins of Muek- 
eraeh Casile, of which the roofless tower is the principal 
remnant. The stronghold was the original seat of the Grants 
of Rothiemurchus. It was built by Patrick Grant in 1598. 
The lintel stone of its doorway has been built into one of the 
walls of the Doune mansion, the residence of the lairds of 
Rothiemurchus, 2 miles up the Spey from Aviemore. It 
bears the date of the erection of the castle, the owner's arms 
(three crowns and three wolves' heads), and the words " In 
God is al my traist." Only a portion of the original structure 
remains. 

The road westward can be followed to the old church and 
churchyard of Duthil. In ancient times the district was 
known as Glencarnie, or Glencharnoch (" Glen of Heroes "), 
from the number of illustrious dead who were laid to rest 
under cairns, many of which remain. 

The churchyard has been the burial-place of the Grants for 
three hundred years, and contains two mausoleums erected by 
them during the latter half of the nineteenth century. The 
history of the church goes back to the thirteenth century. 

The road crosses the Duthil Burn before reaching Carr 
Bridge, a thriving village health resort, situated 850 feet 
above sea-level. It is surrounded by pine-clad hills and is 



112 EXCURSIONS FROM GRANTOWN 

built on a subsoil of gravel, so that the climate is particularly- 
salubrious. Some fifty yards above the bridge which carries 
the roadway over the Dulnain are the carefully-preserved 
remains of a very singular arch, spanning the stream. The 
origin of the old arch was shrouded in mystery until the dis- 
covery of a document in which the people of the district thank 
the Earl of Seafield of two hundred years ago for erecting the 
bridge, and so enabling them to carry their dead to Duthil 
churchyard with more comfort across the often-swollen 
Dulnain water. The two arches are seen to best advantage 
when viewed from below. 

A mile away is Carr Bridge station, on the Highland Rail- 
way. From it the return to Grantown may be made vid 
Aviemore and Boat of Garten. Those who do not avail 
themselves of the railway may return by following the old 
North Road southward for three miles, and then turning 
sharply to the left into the Aviemore road to Grantown. The 
road passes near Boat of Garten and Broomhill stations. 

The Bridge of Brown (10 miles) ; and Tomintoul (14). 

The road from Grantown to Tomintoul runs in a south- 
easterly direction. It is rough, but the scenery is very inter- 
esting. The Bridge of Brown is on the route, in a most 
romantic spot. At the point where the stream is spanned, the 
water flows through a rock channel some 2 feet wide at the 
surface of the stream, and 8 or 10 feet wide at the upper 
surface of the rocks some 40 feet above the water. This part 
of the stream is known as the Linn of Brown. Tomintoul 
may be reached otherwise by train to Ballindalloch and then 
by motor-car (see p. 105). 

Loch-an-Dorb, to the north-west of Grantown, may be 
reached by tramping across the moor, by a carriage-road (10 
miles), or by rail to Dava station on the Highland Railway 
and thence by a walk of three miles. The Loch is a fine sheet 
of water. On an island is a castle that has been the scene of 
many stirring events. In 1303 it was captured by Edward I 
of England. Forty years later it became the prison of 
William Bullock, a favourite of David Bruce, who, being 
suspected of tampering with the English, was starved to death 
in its dungeon. On the eastern side is Craig Tiribeg (Cheere- 
peck), 1,586 feet, one of the heights on which bonfires are 
lighted to celebrate great events in the Grant family. 

For travelling up Strathspey by rail from Grantown to 
Boat of Garten there is a choice of routes. The Great North 
of Scotland line runs by Nethybridge south of the Spey, 
while the Highland line goes to Broomhill on the north side 
of the river. 



NETHYBRIDGE 113 

Nethybridge. 

Angling. — Trout fishing free to guests at the Nethy Bridge Hotel. 

Golf. — A good sporting 9-hole course a short distance from Nethybridge station. 

Visitors' fees: day, is. 6d. ; week, 5s.; month, 10s. 6d. ; season, 15s. 

Family tickets at reduced rates. 
Hotel. — See Introduction. 
Places of Worship. — Established Church, 12 and 6.30, United Free, Episcopal 

Church services in the Drill Hall. 
Post Office. — Near the bridge. Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 

a.m. 
Tennis. — Hour, gd. ; week, 2s. 6d. ; fortnight, 5s. ; month, 10s. ; season, 

15s. 6d. Family tickets at reduced rates. 

The village of Nethybridge is on the edge of Abernethy 
Forest, 700 feet above sea-level. Its residents rejoice in the 
fact that the place has no street. The houses are very scat- 
tered and stand among the trees that form the fringe of 
thousands of acres of pine woods, which load the pure invigor- 
ating air with their delicious odour. 

Nearly opposite the Post Office is a rough road that leads 
to a village called the Causar. It is a short mile from the 
bridge, and consists of wooden houses mainly inhabited by 
workmen employed at the saw-mills. From its vicinity there 
are pleasant views. 

The Nethy is not a large stream, but an extensive beach of 
white, water-washed stones on either side shows that it is 
wild and powerful when in flood. These stones have been 
torn from its banks in its progress from the Cairngorm 
Mountains, and have accumulated here on the level haugh 
until they seem to be higher than the ground on either side. 
The name of the stream signifies " the impetuous washing 
river." And it certainly is impetuous, for in its course, 
which is not more than 12 or 14 miles, it falls more than 
2,000 feet. Half a mile from its source it enters Loch Avon. 
Leaving the loch at a right angle it falls into one of the wildest 
and most romantic mountain passes in Scotland, the Gar- 
vault, which separates Cairngorm from the Ben Baynacs. 

" To one who delights in Alpine scenery of the most rugged 
form, the sight of the Garvault would be an ample reward 
for a day's journey. Cairngorm and Ben Baynac seem to 
have been sawn asunder by the Nethy, leaving sheer preci- 
pices on both sides of about a thousand feet in height. Linns 
of Dee or Ben Nevis burns cannot be compared for a moment 
with the chasm at the bottom of which the Nethy roars 
through huge fragments of granite that have fallen from the 
beetling precipices that rise on both sides of the stream. 

A berdeen (h) 



114 NETHYBRIDGE— BROOMHILL 

Numberless streamlets rush down the face of the precipices 
in perpetual foam, like threads of crystal on the moss-covered 
rocks that overhang the gulf below." 

A mile from the bridge, near the Parish Church, is a ruin 
called Castle Roy, or the Red Castle, standing on a knoll 
close to the road between Nethybridge and Grantown. It 
was a stronghold of the Comyns, when they were Lords of 
Badenoch, but the reason of its name is unknown. The 
massive walls show no traces of having been pierced for win- 
dows. At the corners of the castle there appear to have been 
round towers, which perhaps served for temporary habita- 
tions, " but," says a writer, " the area within the walls is 
evidently too great to make it probable that ever there was 
a roof above it. Most likely it was a strong place in which 
retainers could take refuge with their cattle when powerful 
reivers were expected." 

Nethybridge is favourably situated for excursions to the 
Cairngorm range, particularly to Cairngorm itself, the summit 
(4,084 feet) of which can be seen from the bridge. Both 
Cairngorm and Ben Muich Dhui (or Macdhui) (4,296 feet) 
can be ascended in the course of a single day's outing from 
Nethybridge by driving to the foot of Cairngorm. 

Broomhill, 

the Highland Railway station for Nethybridge, which is 
about a mile from it, stands near the confluence of the Nethy 
with the Spey. From the high-road above the station the 
view towards the Cairngorm range is magnificent. 

Opposite the mouth of the Nethy is Tullochgorum Farm, 
which gave its name to the celebrated air to which the Rev. 
John Skinner of Longside, Aberdeenshire, wrote the song : 

" Come, gie's a sang, Montgomery cry'd." 
It will be remembered that Burns called this " the best Scotch 
song Scotland ever saw." 

Boat of Garten. 

Golf. — Near the station is a 9-hole golf course, with many natural hazards . 

Visitors' fees : day, is. ; week, 5s. ; fortnight, 7s. 6d. ; month, 105. ; 

season, 20s. 
Hotel. — See introduction. 
Places of Worship. — St. Colitmba's Church and United Free Church. 

Boat of Garten is a junction of the Highland Railway with 
the Strathspey section of the Great North of Scotland Rail- 



BOAT OF GARTEN— AVIEMORE 115 

way, which here has its western terminus. It owes its name 
to having been the site of a ferry which has been superseded 
by a substantial bridge. On the breezy, bracing, sunny 
moor through which the Spey here flows, a pleasant village 
has sprung up. On a long straight road running westward 
from the station are shops and private houses, the Post Office, 
the Public Hall and St. Columba's Church. Along a road 
running north and south from the hotel, which stands near 
the station and has been enlarged recently, many villas of 
a good class have been erected. 

From Boat of Garten the mountaineer can take many 
delightful excursions, while visitors who cannot climb great 
heights have within easy reach points which command mag- 
nificent views of the wide valley of the Spey and of the 
mountain ranges by which it is encircled. 

That part of Strathspey which lies above Boat of Garten 
is traversed by the Highland Railway. It has an important 
station at — 

Aviemore. 

Angling. — Trout fishing. 

Distances. — By rail : Boat of Garten, 5 miles ; Carr Bridge, 6| ; Grantown, 

12J ; Inverness, 34J ; Kingussie, nf. By road ; Boat of Garten, 7 miles; 

Carr Bridge, ~J ; Grantown, 15 ; Inverness, 32 ; Kingussie, 12. 
Golf. — A 9-hole course, with modern club-house. It is beautifully situated 

near Inverdruie, about J mile from Aviemore station. Visitors' fees : 

day, is. ; week, 3s. 6d. ; fortnight, 6s. ; month, 8s. 6d. ; season, 12s. 

Family tickets, first two at full rate, the rest at half price. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 
Places of Worship. — 

Aviemore Parish Church — 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

Rothiemurchus Parish Church — 12 noon. 

United Free Church — Rothiemurchus, n a.m.; Aviemore Hall, 6 p.m. 

Episcopal Church — Rothiemurchus, 8.15 and 11.30 a.m., 5.30 p.m. 

Alvie Parish Church — 11.30 a.m. 
Post Office. — Near the Station. Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 

10 a.m. 

Aviemore is a charming summer resort. Pure invigora- 
ting air, fine scenery and delightful walks and drives are among 
its attractions, and as it is the junction of the old and new 
routes to the North there is an exceptionally convenient 
service of trains in all directions. 

It nestles at the base of the famous Craigellaehie Rock, 
from which the clan Grant derives its war-cry, " Stand 
fast, Craigellaehie." Ruskin's vivid description of the rock 
will be recalled, and his reference to the Highland soldier 
in battle. 



116 AVIEMORE 

" There is nothing remarkable in either its height or form ; 
it is darkened with a few scattered pines and birch trees 
and touched along the summit with a flush of heather ; but 
it constitutes a kind of headland or leading promontory in 
the group of hills to which it belongs — a sort of initial letter 
of the mountains ; and thus stands in the minds of the 
inhabitants of the district — the Clan Grant — for a type of 
themselves. Their sense of this is beautifully indicated in 
the war-cry of the clan, ' Stand fast, Craigellachie.' You 
may think long over these few words without exhausting the 
deep wells of feeling and thought contained in them — the 
love of the native land and the assurance of faithfulness to it 
. . . often . . . the remembrance of its gray rocks and 
purple heaths must have risen before the sight of the High- 
land soldier — how often the hailing of the shot and the shriek 
of battle would pass away from his hearing and leave only the 
whisper of the pine branches — 'Stand fast, Craigellachie! " 

The Rock is the best view-point at Aviemore. In the 
panorama from it are three of the five highest mountains in 
the United Kingdom, and they stand within ten miles of the 
spectator. Extending from Aviemore is the great plain 
containing the vast forests of Glenmore and Rothiemurchus, 
always open to the public by reason of the numerous rights 
of way through them. 

Just below the bridge which spans the Spey at Aviemore, 
the river receives the Druie. At the eastern end of the bridge 
is the hamlet of Inverdruie, which contains the United Free 
Church and a Library which the late Dr. James Martineau 
renewed. Between Aviemore station and Inverdruie are 
saw- mills and the Episcopal Church. 

Rather more than a mile southward of Inverdruie is the 
Doune, the residence of the laird of Rothiemurchus, occupy- 
ing one of the finest positions in Strathspey. A short dis- 
tance south of it is Rothiemurchus Church. Visitors desirous 
of knowing something of the history of the house will find 
pleasure in perusing the Memoirs of a Highland Lady. The 
authoress was the sister of Sir John Peter Grant, K.C.B., 
who practically rebuilt the Doune. 

EXCURSIONS FROM AVIEMORE. 

To Loch-an-Eilean and Loch Gamhna vid Inverdruie and 
the Croft, returning vid Polchar and Inverdruie. 

Loch-an-Eilean, " the Lake of the Island," is about three 
miles south of Aviemore station. On a small island are the 



EXCURSIONS FROM AVIEMORE 117 

ruins of a stronghold of the Wolf of Badenoch (Earl of Buchan), 
the scourge of the northern counties. Between the loch 
and Inverdruie Church rises a birch-clad hill called Ord-Bain, 
or the white hill, because it is formed of limestone. 

Loch Gamhna is a small loch at the upper end of Loch-an- 
Eilean. It is adorned with water-lilies, which visitors must 
leave untouched. Polchar was for many years the summer 
and autumn residence of Dr. Martineau. 

To Lynwilg, Kinrara House, and Tor Alvie. 

Lynwilg is a hamlet containing an hotel that may serve as 
the headquarters of pedestrians who wish to explore the 
Grampians. Tor Alvie, or the Hill of Kinrara, is the site of 
a lofty pillar in memory of the last of the old Dukes of Gordon. 
From the monument may be obtained a magnificent view of 
typical Highland scenery. Kinrara House, at the foot of the 
Tor, was the favourite residence of the celebrated Lady Jane 
Maxwell, Duchess of Gordon, the mother of the last Duke. 
Her grave is marked by a granite monument on the site of 
St. Eada's Chapel. 

A Circular Drive by Kincraig. 

The outward route passes through Lynwilg and by Loch 
Alvie. Kincraig has a station, originally called Boat of 
Insh, on the Highland Railway. The ferry which gave the 
place its curious name has been superseded by a bridge. Half 
a mile from the station is Insh Church, which is believed to 
date from Culdee times. It still has a bronze bell of that 
period. Loch Insh is " the home and hold of the big pike — 
of the small ones, too ! — of the Spey." The north-eastern 
corner of the Loch is about midway between Kincraig and 
Feshie Bridge, in the romantic Glen Feshie. 

Round by Boat of Garten, an excursion which takes the 
visitor past Carr Bridge. The return journey is made past 
Kincardine Church, a very old building with a leper window, 
and near the door a rude stone font. Two miles from Avie- 
more station the route passes over Coylum Bridge, the centre 
of very picturesque scenery. 

Ascent of Cairngorm (4,084 feet) (14 miles to the summit). 
Carriages can proceed as far as Glenmore Lodge, and from 
that the summit is only 5 miles. 

Through the Larig Ghru Pass to Braemar (30 miles). The 
route lies along the course of the Druie to the hamlet of 
Coylum Bridge, 2 miles, where is the last permanently- 
occupied habitation that will be seen until the keeper's cot- 
tage is reached in Glen Derry, 10 miles short of Braemar. A 
short distance beyond the summit of the Pass, which has an 
elevation of 2,750 feet, are ice-cold pools, called the Pools 
of Dee, situated 12 miles from Aviemore. Thence the 
path is- followed across and down the left bank of the Dee, 



118 AVIEMORE TO BRAEMAR 

nearly to the opening of Glen Geusachan. There it leaves the 
river and enters Glen Lui, in which is Derry Lodge, at the 
junction of the Derry Bum and the Lui Water. Some 4 miles 
from the lodge the road, after bearing away from the Lui, 
again runs along the bank of the Dee. 

The central portion of the route is extremely rough. The 
walk can be shortened by driving for a few miles, and by 
wiring to Braemar for a carriage to be in waiting at Derry 
Lodge. Finger-posts have been erected by the Rights of 
Way Society. 



HUNTLY. 

Angling. — Permits to fish portions of the Bogie, Deveron, Isla and other streams 
are granted by the Town Council for a nominal fee (see pp. 122-3). 

Banks. — Xorth of Scotland and Town and County, Union, Royal, Commercial. 

Bowls. — A green in the midst of the New Feus. Visitors' fees : week, is. id. ; 
month, 5s. 

Conveyances. — Motor omnibuses run to Aberchirder, carrying passengers also 
to and from Auchintoul, Bridge of Marnoch, Bogniebrae, Cobairdy, Lessen- 
drum, and other intermediate places, in connection with the principal 
trains between Huntly and Aberdeen, Keith, Banff, Elgin, and other sta- 
tions. 

Distances. — London, 521 miles; Aberdeen, 41. By road: Aberdeen, 39 
miles ; Aboyne, 37 ; Banff, 21 ; Craigellachie, 19 ; Cullen, 19J ; Elgin, 27 ; 
Portsoy, 17J. 

Early Closing. — Thursdays. 

Golf. — A 9-hole course, about a mile from the station. 

Hotels. — -See Introduction. 

Library and Reading-Room. — Annual subscription to the Library, 2s. to 10s. 6d. 
Annual subscription to the Reading-Room, 2s. ; non-subscribers, one 
halfpenny per visit. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Congregational, Episco- 
pal, and Roman Catholic — -n and 6. 

Post Office. — The Square. 

Tennis.— Courts near the bowling green. Visitors' fees : week, is. 6d. ; month, 
5S- 

HUNTLY, the largest inland town in Aberdeenshire, has 
deservedly found favour as a holiday resort, and also 
as a place of residence. It stands in the centre of an exten- 
sive agricultural district, in the very heart of the Gordon 
country, and may be called the capital of the old territorial 
division of Strathbogie. It is very prettily situated on rising 
ground at the confluence of the Deveron and the Bogie, in 
the midst of charming scenery. On the north it is bounded 
by the Binn Hill. On and around the hill was one of the largest 
pine forests in Scotland, but it was almost wholly cut down 
during the war. The climate of Huntly is healthy and brac- 
ing, and there is a good supply of pure water from Clashmach 
Hill. From the railway Huntly is seen to greatest advantage 
by those who approach from the south. 

Many of the houses stand in large gardens, and these help 
to give the town the open aspect which is one of its most 
striking characteristics. 

119 



120 HUNTLY 

The principal streets are wide, and there is a spacious 
market Square, containing the hotels, the post office, the 
Brand6r Reading-Room and Library (the gift of a former 
townsman), a fine fountain, and a Statue of the fifth Duke of 
Gordon, the last of the old line. 

On the south side of the town is a large residential building 
known as Scott's Institution, after the name of the founder, 
who provided it for feuars who may be in want after reaching 
the age of fifty. It was enlarged at a cost of some £5,000, 
a portion of a legacy of £60,000 to £70,000 bequeathed to the 
institution by Mr. Morison of pill fame. 

There are a number of pleasant walks, particularly on the 
Battlehill, a wooded eminence near the railway station, and 
at the Meadow Braes, which lead to the ruins of — 

Huntly Castle, 

once the residence of the Gordons, in whose family it still 
remains. The grounds are open to the public daily except on 
Sundays. 

The first lords of Strathbogie sided with the English in the 
wars of Scottish independence. For their unpatriotic con- 
duct their lands were confiscated by Robert the Bruce, who 
bestowed them on Sir Adam Gordon,, a valiant and faithful 
follower, whose descendants became Lords of Huntly, Mar- 
quises of Huntly, and Dukes of Gordon, and were, for many 
generations, all-powerlul through the upper districts of Aber- 
deenshire and Banffshire. For centuries the head of the 
Gordons has been known as " the Cock of the North." The 
nickname is said to have arisen from a remark made to Queen 
Mary by a French nobleman, who, referring to the powerful 
Gordon of that day, expressed the opinion that " this Cock of 
the North should have his wings clipped." As may be 
remembered, a march bearing the name is the regimental 
quickstep of the Gordon Highlanders. 

The entrance to the grounds containing the Old Castle is 
visible from the Square, and is but the length of a street from 
it. The gateway is in a central tower having on either side 
schools " erected in memory of George, fifth Duke of Gordon, 
by his widow. Founded 1839, opened 1841." Within the 
arch are marble busts of the Duke and Duchess, and over the 
point of egress is the inscription : 

" These Memorials of George, Fifth Duke of Gordon, and his 
Widow, Elizabeth, Duchess of Gordon, are placed here in testimony 



HUNTLY 121 

of the respect and affection of an attached tenantry and a faithful 
people." 

At the lodge on the right-hand side of the arch is kept the 
key of the Castle. It can be obtained at any time on appli- 
cation to the lodge-keeper. 

A walk of about 400 yards along an avenue skirted with 
ornamental trees and shrubs brings one to the magnificent 
ruins of the Old Castle, standing on rising ground, with the 
Deveron in its rear, and what must have been a moat in front, 
and with its thick walls and defensive towers in sufficient 
preservation to indicate its original strength. 

On the site formerly stood Strathbogie Castle, which 
was almost entirely destroyed after the battle of Glenlivet in 
1594. Its successor was erected in 1602 by the first Marquis 
of Huntly. Two round towers flank the building on the east 
and west, and between them are the remains of the principal 
apartments. Here, over the upper row of windows, are 
letters forming this inscription in two rows : 

GEORGE . GORDOVN . FIRST . MARQVIS . OF . HV 
HENRIETTA . STEVART . MARQVISSE . OF . HV 

As the wall is broken beyond the Hv, we may reasonably 
surmise that the inscription is incomplete, and that the letters 
" ntlie " followed. 

Over what appears to have been the principal entry is 
much mutilated heraldic sculpture. The dungeon under 
the east tower can be explored by the aid of artificial light. 
In the west tower a spiral staircase can be ascended with 
safety, and from the top there is a fine view over hill and 
dale. In one of the apartments to which the staircase gives 
access is a very elaborate fireplace bearing the date 1606. 

It may be remembered that George MacDonald introduces 
the old castle into his story Alec Forbes of Howglen. 

A short distance beyond the Castle is a bridge leading into 
the grounds of Huntly Lodge, and through these visitors are 
allowed to walk when the residence is not occupied. 

To many Huntly will be interesting as the Birthplace of 
George MacDonald, who sketched it in Alec Forbes, while the 
" Glamour " and the " Wan Water " of which he wrote are 
but the Bogie and the Deveron under other names. 

The house in which he was born is no longer in the same 
condition. It was an old-fashioned cottage, but now appears 
as a modern shop. It stands at the lower corner of the 



122 HUNTLY 

junction of Church Street with Duke Street, the latter being 
the lower portion of a long street leading from the station 
to the square. A little later in life the novelist's home was 
the Farm, as it is called in Huntly, just outside the town. It 
is a plain house surrounded by trees, and has been somewhat 
altered since his time, but it is inhabited by relatives who, as 
far as they can, preserve whatever is connected with their 
illustrious kinsman. The room in which his parents slept 
still contains the old-fashioned bed in the wall, and in a tiny 
room adjoining this is a little square table that belonged to 
them, and is said to be 150 years old. The room in which 
MacDonald slept is at the top of the house. It is lighted by 
a sky-light. The Farm is the " Howglen " of Alec Forbes. 

Within a stone's throw is the cottage in which Annie lived, 
and hard by is the mill described in the story. Also at the 
corner of MacDonald Street, against the pretty little Epis- 
copal Church, is the factory in which Robert Falconer 
surreptitiously practised on the fiddle. 

To reach the Farm, follow Gladstone Road, a long thor- 
oughfare on the left as the town is entered from the station. 
At the end turn to the left and cross a bridge, by the side of 
which is Annie's Cottage. Presently the railway is crossed, 
and the house is just opposite the signal-box named Huntly 
South Cabin. 

Many are drawn to Huntly by the — 

Angling 

which can be enjoyed in its rivers and in water at a short 
distance. Formerly the waters were free for salmon as well 
as trout, but now a small charge is made to meet the tax 
imposed by the Deveron Fishery Board, the cost of removing 
the cruives that were formerly at the mouth of the Deveron, 
and the wages of watchers. The trout are exceptionally 
large. 

Says a writer in The A ngler : 

"To anyone who has fished them, the mere mention of such 
streams as the Deveron, Isla, Bogie, Kirkney, and Ness Bogie is 
enough to recall pleasant reminiscences and days of brilliant sport. 

" The Deveron, to anglers of any experience, near and far, is 
known for the abundance and excellence of its trout, and much of 
it, through the courtesy and generosity of His Grace the Duke of 
Richmond and Gordon, is available to anglers free of charge. 
About 5 miles of lovely water, upward from the pretty little town 
of Huntly, anyone may fish, and, if a fisher of any skill, secure 



EXCURSIONS FROM HUNTLY 123 

capital baskets. April, May, June, and the first half of July, is the 
best season for the trouting, and October for the salmon fishing. 
In addition there is at Rothiemay (next railway station) another 
choice trouting bit of Deveron. 

"The whole waters referred to are lovely, streamy, fly-fishing 
waters ; and in June and the first half of July they yield capitally 
to the clear-water-up-stream wormer. During the whole of both 
months very large trout can be got at night with parr-tail and 
natural minnow. 

" The Bogie contains very fine large trout, and so does the Isla. 
Running up to Gartly with the morning train, one can fish down the 
Bogie to Huntly nicely before night, and with the first train to 
Grange get to and fish the Isla down to Rothiemay, and return home 
by the last up train. The Kirkney is a fine sparkling stream, and 
in the summer months it gives splendid baskets of beautiful small 
trout. 

" All the waters named can be reached from Huntly quite easily 
within half an hour." 

EXCURSIONS FROM HUNTLY. 

Pedestrians should follow the Deveron Road to the Meadow- 
Stile, and thence walk through " the Plantin' " to Little Brig 
and Deveron Bridge. 

Another pleasant walk is along the Deveron Road to the 
Cemetery ; thence along Glass Road (on the left) to Caimford 
Bridge, over the Deveron ; and returning to the town by a 
path alongside the Binn. 

Well worth a visit also is the meeting of the waters of the 
Deveron and the Bogie. It is quickly reached by the road 
which runs past Pirriesmill to Kinnoir Wood. 

Kirkney Glen, 4 miles from the town, is a splendid spot 
for a picnic. It has typical Highland scenery and there is 
no other place in the district like it. 

Among railway excursions that can be conveniently made 
from Huntly are visits to Banff, Portsoy, Cullen, Gordon 
Castle at Fochabers, Elgin and Craigellachie. 



BANFF AND MACDUFF. 

TO these twin towns on the Moray Firth coast there are 
two railway routes from Aberdeen, each a part of the 
Great North of Scotland system. One leaves the main line 
at Inveramsay (p. 99), the other at Grange or Cairnie 
Junction (p. 10 1). 

Inveramsay to Macduff. 

The Banff and Macduff line runs through a district that in 
many parts is most interesting and attractive. Having 
passed Wartle and Rothienorman, the traveller comes to 
Fyvie. Half a mile east of the railway is Fyvie Castle, " one 
of the noblest and most beautiful specimens of the rich archi- 
tecture which the Scottish Barons of the days of King James 
VI obtained from France." Its main features are the towers 
(now five in number), bartisan turrets, dormer windows, and 
high-pitched gables. It stands in beautiful grounds. Ad- 
mission is granted only to those who have obtained a permit. 
On one of the turrets of the Castle is the stone effigy of Andrew 
Lammie, the lover of Mill 0' Tifty's Annie, the heroine of a 
" waeful " ballad showing how the course of true love was 
crossed and broken. It thus concludes — 

" Ye parents grave, who children have, 
In crushing them be cannie ; 
Lest when too late you do repent — 
Remember Tifty's Annie." 

The Mill 0' Tifty is about half a mile north-east of the castle, 
and the churchyard holds Annie's 'grave. 

At 14 \ miles from Inveramsay is Auchterless station, 
where, on the left, now used in connection with a farmhouse, 
is the square keep of Towie Barclay Castle, founded in 
1300. 

About two miles beyond, on a gentle slope to the right, is 
Hatton Castle, a red sandstone building erected about 181 4. 

124 



TURRIFF— EDEN CASTLE 125 

With it is incorporated part of the tower of the ancient Castle 
of Balquholly. 

The next station is at Turriff, a town containing the ruins 
of a church that once belonged to the Knights Templars. 
Near Turriff the Cumineston Burn, or Water of Tvrriff, falls 
into the Deveron. Much of it is open to the public for fishing. 
Passing Turriff, the line runs for a short distance through the 
beautiful valley of the Deveron. On the opposite bank of a 
picturesque bend of the stream is Forglen House, built in 
1440. Then, after Plaidy, comes King Edward station, 
the latter name a corruption of Kinnedar or Kin Edart. 
Near it are the ruins of Eden Castle, the ancient seat of the 
once powerful Earls of Buchan. 

Spence in his Ruined Castles in Banff has preserved a legend of 
the murder, by one of the earls, of the only son of a widow. Accord- 
ing to the story, the laird, at the earnest request of the woman, 
undertook the correction of her son, who had got beyond her con- 
trol. By way of performing his task the laird took the youth down 
to the Deveron and having plunged him into the " pot," held him 
there till he was drowned. Meeting his mother, the laird told her 
what he had done. Resenting his too effective treatment she pro- 
nounced as a curse on his castle the words : " Cauld blaw the win' 
aboot the Hoose o' Eden." In consequence of this imprecation 
there is said to be always a wind about Eden, even on the calmest 
summer day. 

Five miles farther is Banff Bridge station, from which there 
is a fine view of the Deveron, Duff House and the town of 
Banff. 'Buses run between the Bridge station and Banff, 
for owing to engineering difficulties this line has not been 
carried into that town, which is reached directly by the line 
described below. The branch from Inveramsay, however, 
goes into Macduff, which is its northern terminus and is only 
a quarter of a mile from Banff Bridge station. 

The Moray Firth Coast Line 

is one of three railway routes by which travellers can proceed 
from Aberdeen to Elgin, Forres, Nairn, Inverness, and the 
Northern Highlands. 

The other routes are : (a) By the Great North of Scotland Rail- 
way via Keith, Dufftown, and Craigellachie to Elgin. 

(b) To Keith by the G.N.S.R., thence to Elgin by the Highland 
Railway. The first route is 9 miles longer than the second, but 
is much more picturesque. 

The Moray Firth Coast line is also part of the Great North 
of Scotland system. It leaves the main line at Grange, or 



126 BANFF 

Cairnie Junction, 8 miles beyond Huntly (pp. 1 19-122). With 
the exception of Knock Hill (1,409 feet), on the left, about 
4 miles from Grange, there is nothing calling for notice 
until the train reaches Tillynaught Junction, about 10 miles 
from Grange and 59 from Aberdeen. There a short line of 
6 miles runs eastward through Ladysbridge to Banff Harbour 
station, the terminus in— 

BANFF. 

Angling. — There is good sea-fishing. 

Banks. — North, of Scotland and Town and County, Union, National, Commercial. 

Bathing. — On a sandy beach. 

Bowls. — Town and County Club and Banff Bowling Club. 

'Buses meet trains at Banff Bridge and Harbour Stations. A motor 'bus runs 

at frequent intervals to and from Macduff. There is a conveyance thrice 

a day to Whitehills, a village 3 miles west of Banff. 
Distances. — Aberdeen, 50 miles ; Elgin, 38J. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 
Golf. — Duff House course, '18 holes. Visitors' fees : is. per round; day, is 6d. ; 

week, 6s. ; month, 21s. Links Course (along the seashore), 9 holes. Visitors: 

day, is. ; week, 3s. ; month, 6s. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 
Motor-Coach. — To Strichen daily. 
Museum. — High Street. 
Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Wesleyan, Episcopal, 

Roman Catholic. 
Post Office. — Carmelite Street. 
Tennis. — Banff Tennis Club and Town and County Club Grounds. 

Banff, a town of great antiquity, is situated on rising 
ground at the mouth of the River Deveron, here crossed by a 
magnificent seven-arched bridge. Fine woodland scenery 
forms the background of the town. 

In the centre of Banff are the decaying walls of a castle 
which on three occasions was the headquarters of the English 
King Edward I, and was the birthplace of Archbishop 
Sharp, who was so hated by the Covenanters that he was 
murdered at Magus Moor in 1679. The house called Banff 
Castle, which stands on part of the site of the ancient building, 
was erected in 1750. 

In Low Street, the principal thoroughfare, one of the most 
prominent objects is a Fountain that perpetuates the memory 
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Biggar. Mr. Biggar settled in Banff 
in 1 82 1, and was the founder of the Continental herring 
trade, to the great advantage of the fishing community, which 
forms one of the most important sections of the popula- 
tion. 

Low Street formerly contained the Black Bull Hotel, in 
which Dr. Johnson and Boswell spent a night during their 



BANFF 127 

tour in Scotland. It may be remembered that the construc- 
tion of the hotel windows provoked the doctor to write that 
'the necessity of ventilation has not yet been found by our 
northern neighbours." Part of the site of the old Black 
Bull Hotel is now occupied by the Fife Anns Hotel. On the 
opposite side of the street are the County Buildings. To 
make room for them there was removed a plain three-storey 
building in which Lord Byron lived for some time with his 
grandmother and grand-aunt, when he was about seven years 
of age. 

Connected with Low Street is High Street, in which is a 
substantial building containing the Public Library and Reading- 
Room and the Museum. The Museum previously occupied a 
portion of the Grammar School, and its curator for thirty 
years ending December, 1882, was Banff's famous son, the 
late Thomas Edward, the " Scottish Naturalist " of Dr. 
Smiles's well-known work. 

Out of Low Street also one can pass into Carmelite Street, 
a name reminiscent of a monastery for which King Robert 
the Bruce granted the site in 1324. 

Carmelite Street is connected with Church Street, skirting 
the boundary of the old churchyard containing the vaulted 
aisle of the old Parish Church, the burial-place of members 
of the family of Lord Banff . Many of the gravestones belong 
to the seventeenth century, and bear quaint and interesting 
inscriptions. 

Visitors with antiquarian tastes look with interest upon 
the Burgh Cross, which stands on the paved space known as 
the Plainstones, in front of the Municipal Buildings. The 
shaft is supposed to be that of a cross which existed previous 
to the Reformation. The cross originally stood on the spot 
now occupied by the Biggar Memorial fountain, and there, 
if the terms of his sentence were exactly observed, the free- 
booter, James Macpherson, immortalized by Burns in his 
Macpher son's Farewell, was executed in 1700. This was the 
last occasion on which a sentence of capital punishment was 
carried out within the burgh. 

Adjoining the town, and having the principal entrance at 
the end of Low Street, are the grounds of — 

Duff House, 
formerly the seat of the late Duke of Fife. The mansion was 
erected in 1740-5 by William Duff, Lord Braco, who, later, 



128 BANFF 

was created Viscount Macduff and Earl of Fife. It cost 
£70,000. The wings needful to its completion were not added 
on account of a lawsuit that arose between the laird and the 
architect and was decided in favour of the latter. The 
building forms an oblong, four storeys in height. Seen from 
a distance it appears plain and unattractive, but a near 
view discloses much rich ornamentation. 

The two central storeys are adorned with fluted pilasters 
and an entablature of the style of the Temple of Jupiter 
Stator at Rome. A handsome circular stone stairway, with 
carved balustrades, ascends to the principal entrance. At 
each of the four corners of the building is a projection re- 
sembling a tower with a domical roof. In 1883 King Edward 
VII, then Prince of Wales, resided in the mansion for a few 
days as the guest of the late Duke of Fife. 

In 1906 the late Duke gave to the twin towns of Banff and 
Macduff this palatial mansion and the grounds surrounding 
it, covering an area of about 140 acres, together with the 
gardens, stables,, two lodges, and the rod fishings attached 
to the land. This magnificent gift was for the purpose of 
affording the two towns the means of recreation, particularly 
in view of a movement to render Banff more attractive as a 
seaside health resort. 

The mansion and the grounds, with the exception of a 
portion known as the Canal Park, have been leased to a 
syndicate, by whom the house has been converted into a first- 
class sanatorium. A golf course has been laid out and bowling 
greens and tennis courts formed. The reserved portion has 
been opened as a recreation park for the community, and in 
recognition of the gift, in which Her Royal Highness shared, 
is now styled the Princess Royal Park. 

The public also have the privilege of walking along the 
main roads of the sanatorium grounds. One of the avenues 
leads to the Bridge Of Alvah, two miles, where the Deveron 
has scooped for itself a deep channel, the surface of the water 
being forty feet below the bridge. This is, perhaps, the 
prettiest spot in the neighbourhood of Banff. 

A mile from the house, on the bank of the river, is the mauso- 
leum of the Fife family. According to an inscribed slab built 
into the external wall, it "is erected on the place where 
stood a chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin by King Robert 
Bruce, MCCCXXIV." A relic of the chapel has been built 
into the back of the mausoleum. It is an arched vault with 



I? 




Valentine & Sons, Ltd.,] 



HUN'TLY CASTLE. 




Valentine & Sons, I td.,] 

THE BRIDGE OF ALVAH, BANFF. 
Aberdeen. 29 



[Dundee. 




3° 



BANFF— MACDUFF 129 

the recumbent effigy of King Robert Bruce in armour. In 
the vicinity are a spring of cool water, protected by a stone 
building and called St. Mary's Well, and a flat-topped hill, 
traditionally said to be " the result of labours performed 
in penance by members of the old Catholic Church." 

An earlier gift of the late Duke to the people of Banff 
was the Fir Wood, which has an area of 14 J acres, and is 
a very popular resort. 

Montcoffer House, a part of the Fife estates near Banff, 
has been acquired by Prince Arthur of Connaught. It is an 
old residence occupying a picturesque situation on the east 
bank of the Deveron, overlooking the Bridge of Alvah. The 
river at this point passes through a deep gorge which is spanned 
by a high bridge. The rocky banks overhang with magnifi- 
cent trees and the scene is one of the most beautiful and 
romantic in the north of Scotland. 

Visitors who desire to get the best view of Banff and its 
vicinity should climb to the top of the Hill of Doune, on the 
Macduff side of the Deveron. The hill is surmounted by a 
dome-covered structure erected for the purpose of ornamenta- 
tion. It is known as the Temple of Venus, as at one time it 
contained a statue of the goddess. 

The village of Whitehills, to which a conveyance runs from 
Banff, is about 3 miles to the west of the town. The road 
passes the churchyard of Boyndie, containing the ruins of the 
old church and some interesting tombstones, and closely 
associated with episodes in the life of Thomas Edward, the 
naturalist. Whitehills has a harbour constructed by the 
Scottish Fishery Board in 1900, the accommodation of the old 
harbour having proved insufficient. 

MACDUFF. 

Banks. — Xorth of Scotland and Town and County, Union. 

Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Golf. — -See under Banff. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Congregational. 

Recreation. — Bathing, boating, sea and river fishing, golf. 

Macduff is on the eastern side of the small bay on which Banff 
stands, and eastward of the Hill of Doune. The towns are 
about a mile apart. The road between runs along the base 
of the Hill of Doune and over the seven-arched bridge that 
spans the Deveron. 

As a town Macduff dates only from 1783, when through 

Aberdeen (t) 



1 30 MACDUFF 

the influence of the second Earl of Fife with King George 
III the existing hamlet of Doune was made a burgh under 
the name of Macduff, Viscount Macduff being one of his lord- 
ship's titles. When the question of what name the new town 
should bear was under discussion, Lord Fife wrote to his 
factor : " If I changed the name of Down I would alter it 
altogether, as, if we were to say Down Duff, wits would ex- 
plain it as knocking Down my family. You may do in it as 
you incline, but I think if any change is made, it should be 
Macduff, for when I held that title I worked more in the 
Harbour with my own hands than ever you did in all your 
life." 

The institution of the new town is commemorated by 
a Cross opposite the Parish Chureh. Incorporated in this 
cross is a small portion of Macduff's Cross, in Fifeshire. 

The growth of the town has been due to successive im- 
provements of its harbour, which is now one of the safest 
and most convenient on the Moray Firth. Fishing is the 
chief industry. 

The more modern part of the town is well planned and 
contains many houses built for the accommodation of visitors, 
as for more than a century Macduff has been a seaside resort. 

About a mile to the east is Tarlair, which has a chalybeate 
spring, formerly much frequented by the country people, 
for whose convenience the well-house was erected by the 
Earl of Fife in 1780. Nowadays the rock scenery on the 
coast is more attractive. Conspicuous by its peculiar shape 
is the Needle's Eye Rock, which stands by itself close to the 
water's edge. 

For several miles eastward of Tarlair the coast is rocky 
and precipitous. The district has been of great interest to 
students of geology since Hugh Miller graphically portrayed 
it in his Rambles of a Geologist. 

Specially conspicuous features in the contour of the coast 
are three promontories — Gamrie Head (or Mhor Head), 
Troup Head and Pennan Head. 

On Gamrie Head are the ruins, of Gamrie Church, said to 
have been built in 1004, in fulfilment of a vow made during 
a Danish raid. 

The story runs that the invaders had been defeated at 
Aberlemno, and having regained their 'ships hoped to reach 
the coast of Moray, then in possession of their countrymen. 
Their design was frustrated by a tempest, and at length they 



GAMRIE HEAD— GARDENSTOWN 131 

anchored off the coast of Buchan to await a favourable wind. 
They were detained so long that their provisions became 
exhausted. Being faced with starvation, 500 of the boldest 
landed to procure food or to die bravely. They did both. 
They found large herds of cattle grazing and drove them 
towards the sea, but, before they reached the coast, the Thane 
of Buchan with a multitude of the country people got between 
them and their ships. Their retreat being cut off, the mar- 
auders withdrew to Gamrie Head, from the top of which they 
hurled stones upon their assailants. So desperate was the 
defence that the Buchan men began to lose heart. Then 
their chief vowed to Saint John to build him a church upon 
the spot if he would aid in overcoming the heathen. In full 
confidence of success the Scots continued their attack, reached 
the summit of the head and put every Dane to the sword. 
When in fulfilment of the vow the church was built the three 
skulls of the leaders were placed in apertures in the walls 
and were visible there until a comparatively recent date. 
Another memorial of the fight is the name of a spot on the 
brow of the hill above the church : to this day the place is 
known as the " Bloody Pits." The present Parish Church 
is about two miles inland from the old church. 

In a narrow bay on the eastern side of the Head is the 
fishing village of Gardenstown, named after its founder, Mr. 
Alexander Garden, of Troup. It presents a very picturesque 
appearance, as it slopes up from the shore and clings to the 
steep side of an overhanging hill. The descent to it from 
the road above is by a succession of steep zig-zags. Its 
Main Street is so very narrow as almost to realize the descrip- 
tion of the auld brig of Ayr, " where two wheel-barrows 
tremble when they meet." From the shore it is reached by 
a path along which ascent is facilitated by steps, after the 
manner of Clovelly's quaint " Up Along." 

Another rough footpath at the base of the cliffs connects 
Gardenstown with the smaller fishing village of Crovie. 

" The view from the heights of Gamrie on a summer even- 
ing is exceedingly fine. The sea ripples beneath you. Far 
away it is as smooth as glass. During the herring season the 
fishing boats shoot out from the rocky cliffs in which the 
harbours are formed. Underneath are the fishing boats of 
Gardenstown, to the right those of Crovie. Eastward you 
observe the fleet of Fraserburgh vessels creeping out to sea. 
Westward are the fishing boats of Macduff, of Banff, White- 



132 TROUP HEAD 

hills, Portsoy, Cullen, Sandend, Findochty and the Buckies, 
all making their appearance by degrees. The whole horizon 
becomes covered with fleets of fishing boats. Across the 
Moray Firth, in the far distance, the Caithness Mountains 
are relieved against the evening sky. The hills of Morven 
and the Maiden's Pap are distinctly visible. The sun as it 
descends throws a gleam of molten gold across the bosom of 
the Firth. A few minutes more and the sun goes down, leav- 
ing the toilers of the sea to pursue their labours amidst the 
darkness of the night." 

Troup Head, a mile from Gardenstown, is the most nor- 
therly projection on the coast. Hereabouts is " a rugged 
mass of broken hills, forming a cluster of remarkably wild 
glens, rich to exuberance in plants and flowers — a very garden 
of delights to the botanist." In the vicinity of the Battery 
Green a narrow opening on the slope of the hill bears the some- 
what common name of Hell's Lum. From it a subterranean 
passage, nearly ioo yards in length, extends to the sea, and 
along this, on the occasion of a storm, the spray is forced 
till it finds its escape by the lum, or chimney, in the shape of 
dense smoke. Not far from Hell's Lum is another subterranean 
passage called The Needle's Eye. It is some 15 to 20 yards 
long, exceedingly narrow, and terminates in a large cavern 
called the Devil's Dining-Room, supported by huge columns 
of rock, and facing the sea, which runs into it. 

Pennan Head protects a small harbour and the quaint little 
fishing village of Pennan. 



THE MORAY FIRTH COAST 

BANFF TO ELGIN. 

WESTWARD of Banff the Moray Firth Coast line of 
the Great North of Scotland Railway runs through 
a succession of villages and small towns that are mainly 
engaged in the fishing industry ; but some also rightly claim 
to be health resorts. The first of these is — 

Portsoy. 

Banks. — Xorth of Scotland and Town and County, Union. 

Early Closing.— Wednesdays. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Episcopal, Roman Catholic. 

Recreation. — Sea-bathing, sea-fishing, bowls and tennis. 

Portsoy takes its name from Loch Soy, a sheet of water 
beside the station. The surplus water of the lake is carried 
off by the Soy Burn, and on the estuary of this the town is 
situated. Besides dealing with the fish brought in by its 
own fishermen, it receives large quantities from the villages 
along the coast. Tons of salmon are received daily during 
the height of the season. Portsoy is also important as the 
centre of imports and exports for a large and fertile area. 

Its inhabitants have the reputation of being exceedingly 
genial and friendly towards visitors, and, being desirous of 
developing the town as a health resort, the amenities have 
received much attention of late years. Among the im- 
provements is the acquisition of a Public Park. 

The climate is bracing and healthy, the coast is bold and 
rocky, the beach is of shingle, and the bathing from it is safe 
and comfortable. 

Within a few minutes' walk of the town is found the beau- 
tiful serpentine known as Portsoy Marble, so highly prized 
for ornamental purposes. 

To the east of Portsoy are the fine remains of Boyne 
Castle. To the west is the picturesque fishing village of 
Sandend, overlooked by the ruins of Findlater Castle. 

133 



134 CULLEN 

Five miles west of Portsoy is — 
Cullen. 

Banks. — North of Scotland and Town and County, Union. 

Distances. — By rail : Aberdeen, 65 miles ; Inverness, 40. By road : Banff, 

13 J miles; Elgin, 21 ; Peterhead, 48J. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 
Golf. — 18-hole course, is. 6d. per round ; day, 2s. ; week, 60. ; fortnight, 

10s. Ladies and juveniles, is., is. 6d., 4s. 6d. and 7s. 6d. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Wesltyan, Episcopal. 
Post Office. — Seafield Street. Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 

a.m. 
Reading and Recreation Rooms. — Adjoining the Town Hall. 
Recreation. — Angling in a neighbouring burn ; sea-fishing, boating, bathing ; 

golf; cricket, bowls and tennis in grounds off Seafield Place. 

Cullen stands where there is a break in the high cliffs 
and the land slopes gently down to the sea, which forms a 
crescent-shaped bay with a mile-long expanse of sand. 

The little town will be found a very suitable place in which 
to spend a holiday. It is clean and regularly built, the latter 
feature being due.to modern planning, for Cullen has occupied 
its present site barely a century. It originally stood near 
Cullen House. From that position it was removed between 
1 812 and 1830 that the policies of the mansion might be 
extended. Nothing of the old town remains but the Parish 
Church. 

On the higher portion of the present site are the hotels, 
the shops and the houses in which visitors find accommoda- 
tion. Below these, and adjacent to the Harbour, is the 
fishing quarter, the Seatown so happily pictured by George 
MacDonald in his story of Malcolm, in which, as well as 
in the novel entitled the Marquis of Lossie, Cullen and Cullen 
House appear as Portlossie and Castle Lossie respectively. 

Rising from the sands, a little to the west of Seatown, 
are three great rocks called the Three Kings of Cullen. Near 
them is the golf pavilion and the beginning of the course. 
The royal game has been played here from time immemorial, 
and with reference to it there is the following piquant entry in 
the Kirk Session records of 1641 : ' 

" James and George Duffus and George Stevinson convict by 
the Kirk Session in break of the Sabboth for playing at the golff, 
efternoone in time of sermone, and therefor ar ordayned, evrie ane 
of them, to pey halff a merk, and mak their repentance the next 
Sabboth." 

If compared with any average seaside resort Cullen will 



CULLEN 135 

be found in nowise inferior ; but it is placed far above many 
rivals by the grounds of — 

Cullen House. 

The grounds are thrown freely open to the public on Tuesdays 
and Fridays until 6 p.m., and on every other day up to 10 a.m. 

Cullen House is the seat of the Seafield family. It was 
founded in the year 1600, but extensive additions have been 
made to the original building, and since its final enlargement 
in 1 861 the mansion has been a noble specimen of Scottish 
Baronial architecture. It stands on a steep rock at the foot 
of which flows the Cullen Burn, and is connected with the 
grounds by a high stone bridge. The house contains wood 
carvings by Grinling Gibbons, ancient tapestry, and many 
valuable pictures. In the new dining-room is a splendid 
fireplace of Portsoy serpentine and Italian marble, and 
panelling of light and dark bog oak. 

The grounds have an undulating surface, and are beauti- 
fully wooded. They are nearly 3 miles in length, with a 
width as great, and are traversed by 50 miles of carriage 
drives. At the entrance to the grounds are two small bronze 
cannon of Queen Mary's time. 

One of the points which should be visited is the summit 
of the Castle Hill, which lies to the right of the drive leading 
from the main entrance to the house. It commands a magni- 
ficent view. On it stood for half a century the Burgh Cross, 
and sculptured stones still remain there. 

Farther west is a temple with a figure of Fame. 

The Parish Church and churchyard are on the left-hand 
side of the drive, which is entered from the principal street 
of the town. They are about three minutes' walk from 
the factor's house and stables. 

The oldest portion of the church, the Chapel of St. Anne, 
was erected in 1539. The remainder was built four years 
later. Carved inscriptions on the walls are considered to ex- 
hibit the finest examples of ancient lettering in Scotland. 
There are several notable monuments, including one of 
Alexander Ogilvie of Findlater, the founder of the church. 
On the north side of the site of the high altar is a fine " Sacra- 
ment house " — a recess for the reception of the Host — one 
of the few still to be seen in the country. Another notable 
object is the Seafield gallery, which was erected when the 
family removed from the Castle of Findlater to Cullen House. 



136 EXCURSIONS FROM CULLEN 

Half a mile or so up the drive mentioned above, in connec- 
tion with the site of the church, is a gateway, on the left, 
giving admittance to the Grannoch Hill Wood. 

EXCURSIONS FROM CULLEN. 

The Bin of Cullen (1,050 feet) is said to command a view 
of portions of ten counties. The distance from Cullen to the 
summit is a little over three miles. A carriage-road which 
enters the policies of Cullen House at the mouth of the Burn 
leads to the top. From the Bin is obtained the excellent 
water with which the town is supplied. 

Findlater Castle, a ruin two miles east of Cullen, ceased 
to be inhabited about 1600. The nearest way to it starts 
from Seafield Place and passes Logie House, but the route is 
somewhat intricate, and the employment of a juvenile native 
as guide is recommended. It can then be approached by 
passing Logie House, and the return can be made by the Dove- 
cot and Barnyard of Findlater, or vice versd. The circular 
route is about five miles in length. 

In the far-distant past Findlater Castle was the seat of the Sin- 
clairs. In the fifteenth century it passed by marriage into the 
possession of Sir Walter Ogilvie, an Aberdeenshire laird. A later 
Ogilvie was made Earl of Findlater. The fourth holder of the title 
was created Viscount Reidhaven and Earl of Seafield. He was a 
distinguished statesman and was Chancellor of Scotland at the time 
of the Union with England, an event which he did much to promote. 
To him is attributed the flippant remark, as he signed the Act of 
Union, " And there's ane end o' ane auld sang." The Findlater 
earldom became extinct with the death of the seventh earl, but the 
earldom of Seafield, having been created with special remainder, 
passed to the Grant family, who still hold it. 

Fordyce Castle, 4 miles to the south-east, was erected in 
1592, and is still inhabited. 

The Whale's Mouth and the Bow Fiddle are remarkable 
rocks on the coast westward of Cullen. The former lies to 
the right of a red footpath on the side of the brae at the west- 
ern extremity of Cullen beach. The latter is on the other 
side of the headland (Scaur Nose) and is entirely surrounded 
by water. 

The Broxy Burn, an ideal spot for a picnic, is about a mile 
and a half from the town. The walk thither cannot fail 
to charm. Verbal directions should be obtained in the town. 

Beyond Cullen the railway runs along a rocky and inter- 
esting shore. The first station is at Portknockie (2 miles), 
which has a most picturesque harbour. The water is en- 
closed by lofty rocks, covered with the greenest of grass, and 



BUCKIE 137 

on the slopes are the fishermen's houses in a succession of 
terraces. 

The next village, Findochty, has been extended westward 
in recent years by the construction of large and convenient 
houses in straight and level streets, thus gaining increasing 
popularity as a holiday resort. 

But a short distance westward of Findochty is Portessie, 
a small village which since 1 902 has been within the boundary 
of the burgh of Buckie. It has a few modern houses in 
orderly arrangement on the high ground, but for the most 
part consists of a confused cluster of fishermen's dwellings 
near the shore. It is the terminus of the Highland Company's 
line from Keith ; here, too, is the course of the Buckie Golf 
Club. 

Buckie. 

Banks. — Union, North of Scotland and Town and County, Bank of Scotland, 

Commercial, Royal, Clydesdale. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Golf. — On the Strathlene Course at Portessie or on the Spey Bay Course. 
Hotel. — -See Introduction. 
Places of Worship. — Established Church, United Free, Episcopal, Roman Catholic, 

Wesleyan, Baptist. 
Recreation. — Bathing, boating, fishing, golf, bowls, tennis. 

Buckie, 6 miles from Cullen, has long been a sea-bathing 
resort. It is said to have a larger fishing population than 
any other town in Scotland. In little more than half a cen- 
tury it has developed from a village into the largest town in 
Banffshire. Its growth is attributable to the provision of 
harbour accommodation, to the construction of the railway 
and to the erection of houses suitable for summer visitors. 
It has a somewhat straggling appearance, as it comprises 
three villages close to the coast. 

The newer parts have wide streets and are mainly on the 
highest ground, a position which gives the residents a delight- 
ful prospect, both inland and seaward. The latter view 
extends from Portknockie Head on the east to Lossiemouth 
on the west. 

In this upper part of Buckie are the Parish Church, dis- 
tinguished by its square tower with a clock ; the United Free 
Church, which has a fine steeple ; the Episcopal Church, 
with a spire 96 feet high, and the Roman Catholic Church, 
with twin spires rising to a height of 115 feet and forming a 
landmark for many miles around. 



138 SPEY BAY 

Through the town flows the Buckie Burn, spanned by a 
handsome bridge. 

Near Buckie, James Gordon Bennett, the founder of the 
New York Herald, was born, the son of a crofter in the neigh- 
bouring district of Enzie. 

The next westward station is Buckpool and then comes 
Portgordon, the property of the Duke of Richmond and 
Gordon, whose salmon fishings extend for a distance of ten 
miles along the coast. Westward of Portgordon the line 
gets farther and farther from the coast. A mile beyond is 
the Burn of Tynet, famed for its fossil fish in the old red sand- 
stone, and then the line reaches Spey Bay station, where 
passengers alight for — 

Spey Bay, 

a watering-place in the making. A straight road, half a mile 
long, runs northward to the Gordon Richmond Hotel, on the 
border of the beach and close by the Golf Course of 1 8 holes, 
constructed in a way that will enable it to take its place 
among the first-class courses of Scotland. 

There is a sufficient number of natural hazards, but there are 
neither ditches nor streams to cross. There is no crossing in play 
and the plan of the round is readily comprehended by a stranger. 
The membership fee is 21s. per annum for gentlemen, 10s. 6d. for 
ladies or boys. 

Splendid trout fishing can be had in the Spey by hotel 
guests, and they can obtain salmon fishing on special 
terms. 

The site of the hotel is almost in the centre of a wide bay, 
with a beach of rounded stones sloping rather sharply to a 
strip of sand laid bare by the ebbing tide. The arms of the 
bay go to Lossiemouth on one hand and to Portknockie 
on the other. Between the extreme points there extends 
inland, in a great semicircular sweep, a line of high ground 
containing Ben Rinnes, Ben Aigan, and other heights. Be- 
tween the ridge and the sea is a vast 'plain, dotted with woods 
and farmsteads, and having tracts of heather along its 
seaward margin. 

The westernmost house in view on the beach is the ice- 
house of the Duke of Gordon's fishery. 

Four miles inland from the station are the town of Fochabers 
and Gordon Castle, which are more directly served by a short 



GARMOUTH— KINGSTON-ON-SPEY 139 

branch from the Highland line between Elgin and Keith 
(see pp. 148-50). 

Continuing by rail westward from Spey Bay station, 
the Spey is crossed by a magnificent bridge about 950 
feet in length. A little beyond the viaduct is Garmouth, 
a quaint, old-fashioned town with rambling sinuous streets 
innocent of the rush of modern life and offering perfect rest 
and quietude to tired brain-workers. One eventful day 
Garmouth has had. It was in 1650, when Charles II landed 
here from Holland and signed the Solemn League and Cove- 
nant. 

Between Garmouth and the sea is the little town of King- 
ston-on-Spey, owing both its origin and its name to the 
establishment, in 1784, of timber and ship-building yards by 
a firm from Kingston-on-Hull. At that time the trees of 
the Strathspey forests were being felled in large quantities 
and floated down the Spey. The bustling days of prosperity 
belong to the past, and Kingston's present condition is one 
of repose. 

Westward of Garmouth the line passes Urquhart, beyond 
which, on the right, is Innes House, for a time a seat of the 
late Duke of Fife. This is followed by Calcots, near which, 
on the right, are the ruins of Spynie Palace, once the seat of 
the Bishops of Moray, and then comes Elgin. 



ELGIN, LOSSIEMOUTH AND FOCHABERS. 
ELGIN. 

Access. — From Aberdeen by the main line of the Great North of Scotland 

Railway vid Craigellachie, or by the Moray Coast line. By the Highland 

line from the south vid Dunkeld and Forres. 
Angling. — Free in the Lossie for sea trout, yellow trout and whitling. Other 

waters are within easy reach. 
Banks. — North of Scotland and Town and County, Union, Bank of Scotland, 

British Linen, Commercial, Royal, National, Clydesdale. 
Distances. — By rail : Aberdeen, 71J miles ; Inverness, 37 ; London, 572 ; 

Perth, 131. By road : Aberdeen, 66 miles ; Inverness, 38 ; Forres, 12 ; 

Keith, 18 ; Lossiemouth, 5J. 
Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 
Golf. — A 9-hole course about a mile south of the town. Visitors' fees : day, 

is. 6d. ; week, 5s. ; month, 10s. 
The celebrated Lossiemouth course is only 5J miles by rail. 
Hotels. — See Introduction. 
Museums. — Elgin Literary and Scientific Association, near the Little Cross, 10 

a.m. to 6 p.m. (Admission, 3d.); Cooper Park (free). 
Places of Worship. — Established Church, Free, United Free, Congregational, 

Baptist, Episcopal, Roman Catholic. 
Post Office. — Commerce Street. — Week-days, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 

to 10 a.m. 
Public Library and Reading-Room, Cooper Park. — 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Railway Stations. — There are two — one belonging to the Highland Railway and 

the other to the Great North of Scotland Railway. They are connected by 

a long platform. 

Elgin, the county town of Moray, is pleasantly situated 
on the Lossie, between five and six miles from the sea. It 
is sheltered on all sides by well-wooded hills. From its 
fertility, the surrounding district has long been known as 
" the Garden of Moray." The ancient province of Moray 
comprised " the counties of Elgin and Nairn, the greater part 
of Inverness-shire, and part of Banffshire." 

The city of Elgin is clean and bright, stands on dry soil, 
has a mild and salubrious climate, and possesses exceptional 
educational advantages. These and other attractions have 
drawn to it a considerable number of residents of indepen- 
dent means, including many retired Anglo- Indians. As a 
consequence, a large section of the city consists of pleasant 
villas and fine mansions. 

140 



ELGIN 141 

Directly opposite the G.N.S. station, and to the right of the 
Highland station, is Moss Street, which leads up by the side 
of the Station Hotel to Commerce Street, at the upper end 
of which is High Street, the leading thoroughfare. This runs 
east and west and contains, in addition to the banks, prin- 
cipal shops and other places of business, the Parish Church, 
a large building in the style of a Greek temple, erected in 
1828. Near is the Muckle Cross, in the Market Square. It 
was originally erected in the reign of Charles I, and was re- 
stored in 1888. 

Looking along High Street towards the north-west, the 
eye is caught by a monument that crowns the summit of 
a green eminence called — 

Lady Hill. 

On it stood a castle of which mention is first made in a Royal 
Charter of the year 1106, and which was the residence of 
early Scottish kings. Within the precincts was a chapel 
dedicated to the Virgin Mary — hence the name of the hill. 
The monument consists of a Tuscan column surmounted by 
a statue of the last Duke of Gordon. It was " erected by 
public subscription as a tribute of gratitude to His Grace as 
a benefactor of agriculture in the North." A staircase leads 
to the summit. Alongside the monument is an observatory 
erected by a local association in 1898. A new approach to 
Lady Hill from High Street was constructed in 1920 by Sir 
Alexander Williamson, M.P. for Moray and Nairn, and 
presented by him to the town. 

Occupying a fine site at the west end of High Street is Dr. 
Gray's Hospital, an institution unsurpassed by any other of 
its kind in Northern Scotland. It dates from 1829, and bears 
the name of its founder, Dr. Alexander Gray, one of Elgin's 
sons. A few years ago another native, Mr. James Shepherd, 
of Rossend Castle, gave £10,000 towards modernizing and 
perfecting the equipment. 

In olden days a piazza was the architectural feature of the 
High Street. A portion remains in front of Nos. 46 and 50. 
Here stood the inn at which Dr. Johnson stayed on his visit 
to the city. 

At the east end of the street is the Little Cross, built, 
like the greater one, on the foundation of an earlier structure. 
Unlike the Muckle Cross, it was not intended for market pur- 
poses. It is supposed to have marked the eastern boundary 



142 ELGIN 

of the burgh. The present structure dates from the early 
years of the seventeenth century. Nearly opposite the 
Little Cross is the Museum belonging to the Elgin Literary 
and Scientific Association. (Open, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admis- 
sion, 3d.) It contains a valuable collection, some of the most 
interesting objects being fossils from the Lossiemouth quar- 
ries. 

Close by is the remnant of— 

The Cathedral. 

The ruins are among the very finest in Scotland. They 
are about a mile from the railway stations. (Entrance at 
the lodge in North College Street. Fee optional.) 

The Cathedral was founded in 1224 by the Bishop of Moray, 
but of the structure then erected the remains of the south 
transept and the towers are the chief portions, the rest of the 
church as it exists to-day having been built after a fire in 1270. 

It again suffered from fire in 1390, through the act of 
Alexander, Earl of Buchan, commonly known, on account 
of his rapacity, as the Wolf of Badenoch, who, having been 
excommunicated for deserting his wife, sought to be re- 
venged, but it is probable that the damage on this occasion 
was almost entirely confined to the woodwork and the 
furnishings. Under compulsion by the King, who feared 
terrible ill might follow the outrageous sacrilege, the earl 
helped to repair the damage he had done. 

In 1506 the great steeple fell. It was on the central tower 
and rose to a height of nearly 200 feet. The restoration of 
the church was immediately begun, and so much zeal was 
displayed in the work that, on the bishopric becoming vacant 
and the chapter having assembled to elect one of themselves 
to the see, each of the dignitaries solemnly promised that if 
the choice fell upon him he would devote one-third of the 
episcopal revenue to the fund for the rebuilding and improve- 
ment of the Cathedral. 

Unhappily their labours were not of lasting effect, for there 
soon followed the troublous period in which the Regent 
Murray and Queen Mary were striving for the ascendancy, and 
then occurred the beginning of the final destruction of the 
beautiful building, for in 1568 the Regent and his Privy 
Council, being hard pressed for money wherewith to pay their 
soldiers, ordered the lead to be stripped from the roof and 
sold for their benefit. It was bought for about a hundred 
pounds by a mercantile company in Amsterdam, but was 
sunk with the ship off the rocky headland of Girdleness, 
just outside the harbour of Aberdeen. After this act of 



ELGIN 143 

vandalism the beautiful building was allowed to fall into 
decay " as a piece of Romish vanity too expensive to keep in 
repair." 

In the middle of the next century a band of Reformers 
destroyed the paintings in the interior, and the fine rood 
screen. The final blow was given in 171 1, by the downfall, 
for the second time, of the great central tower. 

For nearly a hundred years the ruins lay utterly neglected 
except by those who found the fallen walls a convenient 
quarry and, near the end of the period, by an enthusiastic 
antiquary, one John Shanks, who set himself the task of 
removing what had become mere rubbish. He was appointed 
keeper of the ruins when the Crown laid claim to the site in 
1820, and after that he pursued his good work with renewed 
vigour. In the course of 25 years he cleared away, with 
his own hands, 3,000 barrow-loads of rubbish, and laid bare 
the whole ground plan of the building. 

The style of architecture is the First Pointed Order, and 
the building is the best specimen of it in the country. The 
edifice was 289 feet long, and its greatest breadth was 87 feet. 
The principal entrance was at the west end, between towers 
84 feet in height. The arch of this entrance is 24 feet high 
and beautifully decorated. 

The portion of the building in the best state of preservation 
is the Chapter House, dating from the first quarter of the 
fifteenth century. It stands at the north-east corner, and is 
an octagonal structure 40 feet in diameter. In the centre is 
a massive pillar, some 9 feet in circumference, having the 
form of a cluster of sixteen slender shafts. The Chapter 
House is sometimes called the Apprentice Aisle, from the 
legend, told in connection with other cathedrals, to the effect 
that when the main portion of the building approached com- 
pletion, the apprentices asked to be allowed to show what 
their unaided skill could accomplish, and, having been en- 
trusted with the erection of the Chapter House, produced a 
work far surpassing in beauty that on which their masters 
had been engaged. 

Between the Chapter House and the vestry is the Sacristy, 
containing a lavatory, the water basin of which was the cradle 
of General Anderson, the founder of a local Institution bearing 
his name (p. 144). 

In the Chancel is the tomb of the founder of the Cathedral, 
and to the right, in St. Mary's Aisle, is the burial-place of the 
Gordon chiefs. The first Earl of Huntly lies here and also 
the last Duke of Gordon of the male line. 



144 ELGIN 

In the cathedral graveyard are quaint inscriptions. One 
dated 1687 runs — 

" This world is a citie full of streets, 
And death is the mercat that all men meets. 
If lyfe were a thing that monie could buy, 
The poor could not live and the rich would not die." 

Within the precincts were the residences of the Cathedral 
dignitaries. On the south side, and now separated from the 
Cathedral by the public road, are the remains of the Eishop's 
Town House, originally erected at the beginning of the fif- 
teenth century, when the seat of the bishopric was removed 
from Spynie to Elgin. The portion now standing was only 
the north wing, and was built in 1557 by the last Roman 
Catholic bishop. Together with the ground attached, it is 
the property of the city, having been given to the inhabitants 
by the late Dowager Countess of Seafield. 

A portion of the Deanery has been incorporated with the 
mansion called the North College, while South College is the 
Sub-Dean's residence enlarged and modernized. By following 
the wall at the rear of the South College garden the visitor 
will come to Farm's Port, one of the four entrances to the 
Cathedral precincts, and the only one now extant. 

Near the South College, too, is General Anderson's Institu- 
tion, a large and beautiful building in the Corinthian style. 

The donor's mother was a rustic beaut} 7 of the neighbour- 
hood. Contrary to the wishes of her parents, she married a 
soldier quartered in the town in 1745, and left the country 
with him. Three years later, forsaken and broken-hearted, 
she returned with a baby son in her arms. Denied help bv 
her friends, she made the ruined Cathedral her home and 
cradled her child in the old stone basin in the sacristy. The 
boy received bis education at the local Grammar School, in 
return for cleaning the premises and performing other ser- 
vices. He was subsequently apprenticed to a staymaker, but 
left that occupation and entered the service of the Honourable 
East India Company as a drummer. He finally attained 
the rank of lieutenant-general, and died in London in 1824, 
aged seventy-seven, leaving a sufti of about ^70,000 to 
found " The Elgin Institution for the Support of Old Age and 
Education of Youth." 

Adjoining the Cathedral grounds is Cooper Park, a large 
public recreation ground named after its donor, Sir George 
A. Cooper, Bart., of Hursley Park, Hampshire, a native of 





E. & W. Thorbum,] [Els,m. 

ELGIN CATHEDRAL THE WEST TOWERS PLUSCARDEN PRIORY. 

31 




E. & TJ\ Thorium,] , [Elgin. 

SPYNIE PALACE SHERIFFMILL THE LADIES* WALK. 



EXCURSIONS FROM ELGIN 145 

the town. It comprises 40 acres, and consists of the policies 
of Grant Lodge, the dower house of the Seafields. A lake 
upon which swans have been placed forms one of its most 
attractive features. Another is a bandstand in which good 
bands perform during the summer. The mansion has been 
fitted up as a Museum and Public Library. 

Adjoining Cooper Park is Lossie Green, another extensive 
public recreation ground. It affords facilities for cricket and 
football, and is used for the cattle shows of the Morayshire 
Farmers' Club. 

The public also own ten or twelve miles of delightful 
walks along the banks of the Lossie and through the Oak 
Wood, part of which is the property of the city. 

Visitors with antiquarian tastes will derive pleasure from 
inspecting the old Greyfriars' Abbey. Permission to view it 
can be obtained at the convent in Abbey Street. The Abbey 
was founded by King Alexander II. The ruins have been 
restored and incorporated with a chapel. The work was 
begun by the late Marquis of Bute and completed by the 
present Marquis. 

EXCURSIONS FROM ELGIN. 

Elgin is a good centre from which to visit various places of inter- 
est. From the Highland station excursions may be made to Foyers 
and Fort Augustus on the Caledonian Canal, Burghead, Hopeman, 
Nairn, Inverness, Loch Maree, Kyle of Lochalsh, Loch Duich and 
Fochabers Town for Gordon Castle. 

The places which may be visited from the Great North of Scotland 
station include Lossiemouth, resorts on the Moray Firth Coast from 
Garmouth to Cullen inclusive, and Rothes, Craigellachie and Duff- 
town. 

Motor- 'buses run daily between Elgin and Lossiemouth, and four 
days a week between Elgin, Hopeman and Burghead. 

Pluscarden Priory, 6 miles south-west, was founded by 
Alexander II, in the thirteenth century, and the walls of 
the church having remained in a good state of preservation, 
the edifice was restored and part of it fitted up for Divine 
service in 1898 by the Marquis of Bute, who acquired the 
building by purchase. The fittings are rich in carving and 
the altar is one of the finest in the north of Scotland. 

Duflus Castle, now but a mouldering ruin, 5 miles north- 
west, was a stronghold of the lords of Moray. It may be seen 
a little to the left of the road from Elgin to Covesea. The 
windows were unglazed and the building had no chimneys. 
It was built on the margin of Loch Spynie, much of which 

Aberdeen (k) 



146 LOSSIEMOUTH 

has been silted up, a great part of its site being now a richly 
cultivated plain. 

Covesea (causea) Rocks and Caves are a mile beyond Duff us 
Castle. Visitors should arrive at ebb-tide and should be 
provided with candles or lamps. 

Spynie Palace, 3 miles north of Elgin, was for many cen 
turies the official residence of the Bishops of Moray. It 
was inhabited by Roman Catholic Bishops up to 1573, and 
then by Protestant Bishops for upwards of a hundred years. 
It was annexed to the crown at the Revolution of 1688, and 
since that date has been uninhabited. 

Beside it is Spynie Loch, formerly an inlet of the sea, later 
a far-extending inland lake and now for the most part silted 
up and forming rich pasture land. In olden days it reached 
the walls of both Spynie Palace and Duffus Castle. Close by 
stood the smithy of Bothgowan, said to have been the scene 
of the murder of King Duncan by Macbeth. 

The Kirk of Birnie, about 3 miles south of Elgin by road, 
is " The oldest bishop's church in the diocese of Moray." 
It belongs to the eleventh or twelfth century, and is still strong 
and perfect. It has no east window, contains a copper bell, 
called the " Ronnell Bell " (the only one in Britain) and has 
a distinct chancel and nave with separate roofs — a feature 
unique in the north of Scotland. 

LOSSIEMOUTH. 

Angling.— In the Lossie. 

Bank. — Bank of Scotland. 

Bathing. — Excellent sea-bathing, for which dressing-boxes are provided, and 
there are Baths on the shore. 

Boating. — To a small extent. 

Bowls. — A public green. 

Early Closing. — Wednesdays. 

Golf. — A splendid seaside course of 18 holes, over a variety of ground, fhe 
soil is dry and sandy, the turf is fine, and there are scientific hazards of 
sand bunkers, whins and ditches. Visitors' fees : day, 2s. 6d. ; week, 
10s. There is also a 9-hole course, ij miles in length. 

Hotels. — -See Introduction. 

Inquiries. — May be made of the Town Clerk. 

Library and Readlng-Room.— High Street. 

Places of Worship.— Established Church, United Free, Baptist, Episcopal. 

Lossiemouth is a fishing town and trading port and a 
pleasant east-coast summer resort, distant from Elgin nearly 
six miles by rail and five by road, As its name implies, it is 
situated at the mouth of the Lossie, a beautiful river with a 
course of 25 miles, and affording fair trout fishing. 

The full name of the place is the Burgh of Lossiemouth 
and Branderburgh, but the latter half of the title is little 
used except in official documents and notices. 

By the sea, sheltering under a headland, are Lossiemouth 



TO READERS 

A great part of the success of this series is due, as we grate- 
fully acknowledge, to the enthusiastic co-operation of readers. 
Changes take place, both in town and country, with such 
rapidity that it is difficult, even for the most alert and pains- 
taking staff, to keep pace with them all, and the many readers 
who so kindly take the trouble to inform us of alterations 
that come under their notice in using the books, or to draw 
attention to errors of commission or of omission, render a 
real service not only to us but to their fellow-readers. We 
confidently appeal for further help of this kind. All such 
communications will be duly acknowledged and the infor- 
mation utilized at the earliest opportunity. 

The Editor. 
A ddress — 
Messrs. Ward, Lock & Co., Limited, 
Warwick House, 

Salisbury Square, 

London, E.C.4. 



LOSSIEMOUTH 147 

proper and the more ancient Seatown. To the westward and 
upon the headland is the village of Branderburgh, which 
came into being when a new harbour was formed about the 
time Queen Victoria began to reign. Still more to the west 
is Stotfield, which receives most of the summer visitors and is 
the fashionable quarter. By the amalgamation of these 
various settlements the burgh has been formed. Its growth 
has been phenomenal. 

The popularity of Lossiemouth originated with its Golf 
Course, now so celebrated. The golfers who visited it adver- 
tised the town's many attractions as a watering-place. The 
climate is milder than that of St. Andrews and North Berwick 
in the south, more bracing than that of Nairn, some 27 miles 
to the west, and is one of the driest in Scotland, the average 
rainfall for a series of years being less than 21 inches. Having 
the sea on three sides, there is almost always, even on the 
hottest summer day, an invigorating breeze, while the place 
escapes the severity of the open sea by the shelter of the 
Banffshire coast on the east, and the Caithness and Suther- 
land coasts on the north-west. At Stotfield is a fine sandy 
beach, on which bathing is safe at any state of the tide, for 
there are no currents, hollows, or masses of seaweed. War- 
ships are often stationed off the coast for weeks at a time, and 
their proceedings are a source of unfailing interest. 

From Coulard Hill, as the ridge upon the headland is called, 
there is a wide and entertaining prospect. Far across the 
Firth rise the mountains of Ross-shire, Sutherland and Caith- 
ness. Eastward the view extends to the Bin of Cullen. 
Inland the eye roams over the wide-extending and well- 
cultivated plain known as the Laigh o' Moray, beyond 
which are the Speyside mountains named Ben Rinnes and 
Ben Aigan. 

The local authorities have introduced an abundant supply 
of pure water, and established an efficient system of drainage. 
Observant visitors will notice that the Established Church 
is dedicated to St. Geraldine, and that the saint's effigy is 
upon the burgh seal. According to a legend, the holy man 
lived in a cave on the coast in the early part of the tenth 
century, and on stormy nights walked about the shore 
holding a lantern to warn mariners from the neighbouring 
rocks. That laudable object is now accomplished by a light- 
house situated at an angle of the shore. Beyond it is a 
stretch of sand, and then there is a rugged, picturesque coast, 



148 FOCHABERS 

consisting of cliffs carved into fantastic forms and containing 
the famous Caves of Covesea. One of these is called Sir 
Robert's Stable, because the laird of Gordonstown hid his 
horses in it from the rebels of the '45. It is thought probable 
that at one time an underground passage afforded communica- 
tion between the cave and the mansion, nearly half a mile 
away. 

On the road from Covesea to Elgin is an unusual-looking 
cottage built for the protection of the Michael Kirk, a mauso- 
leum erected to the memory of Sir Robert Gordon, " the 
warlock." From this spot a rough road leads eastward past 
the old church of Drainie, dating from 1675 and now a ruin, 
to a beautiful walk through Drainie fir wood, behind the 
Parish Church. 

FOCHABERS. 

Access. — By the Moray Firth Coast line of the G.X.S.R. to Spey Bay station, 
from which the town is 4 miles southward. By a short branch line, 3 
miles long, from Orbliston Junction, on the Highland Railway between 
Elgin and Keith, The town is f mile from the station. 
There are no trains on the branch line on Sundays. 

Early Closing.— Wednesdays. 

Hotels. — See Introduction. 

Reading-Rooms. — In the Public Institute. 

Recreations. — Tennis, bowling, cricket. 

The town is mainly visited by reason of its proximity to 
Gordon Castle. It is a clean and pretty place. The streets 
are regular and diverge from a central square, in which stands 
a fountain erected in honour of the first Duke of Gordon and 
to commemorate his gift of an abundant supply of good water. 
Milne's Institution, a high-class free school, one of the 
Junior Student Centres for the county, was built and en- 
dowed from a bequest of upwards of ^20,000 by Alexander 
Milne, a native of the place and sometime a servant at Gor- 
don Castle. The story goes that he left the Duke's service 
in consequence of a disagreement as to the way in which he 
wore his periwig, and, having emigrated to America, made his 
fortune as a merchant. 

On the way from the Highland Railway Station to the 
town one crosses the Spey by the Boat 0' Bog Bridge, from 
which can be seen the sea and passing vessels. On the left 
is the principal entrance to the policies of Gordon Castle, 
while on the opposite side of the road- is a pretty Fountain 
bearing the inscription : 

Erected by Natives of Fochabers and others to commemorate 
the heroic stand made by Major Allan Wilson of this town, who with 



GORDON CASTLE 149 

a small band of gallant comrades fell bravely fighting against 
overwhelming odds near the Shangani River, in South Africa, on 
the 4th of December, 1893. 

Gordon Castle. 

Admission. — Visitors are admitted to the Castle and grounds daily except dur- 
ing the brief periods when the ducal family are in residence, and even then 
applicants may frequently obtain admission to the gardens. 

This magnificent seat of the Duke of Richmond and Gordon 
is one of the finest palaces in Britain, and therefore is quite 
in keeping with the quadruple dukedom held by its owner. 
His Grace is a direct descendant of Charles II, and besides 
the three dukedoms of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon in 
Great Britain, holds the French dukedom of D'Aubigny, 
conferred on his ancestress, Louise de Perrencourt de Querou- 
aille, Duchess of Portsmouth, by Louis XIV. The Castle 
consists of a central building four storeys high, connected 
by arcades to a two-storeyed wdng on each side, while behind 
the main building is a ponderous square tower of the four- 
teenth century, a part of the original building. The north 
facade of the castle is 568 feet long. 

Among the features of this " world of a house," as it has 
been called, is a circular vestibule the walls of which are 
covered with hundreds of deers' heads ; most of them labelled 
with the names of the sportsmen who brought them down. 

In the smoking-room are models of salmon famous for 
length or weight, caught on the ducal estates, together with 
photographs of guests, among whom the picture of King 
George V is conspicuous. His Majesty, when Prince of Wales, 
being fond of angling in the Spey, was a frequent visitor to 
the Castle. 

The Castle contains some good family portraits, including 
that of the beautiful Fourth Duchess, by Sir Joshua Reynolds. 
There are many other valuable paintings and some fine 
statuary. 

The Castle was originally surrounded by a morass called 
the Bog o' Gight (the Windy Bog). From the site of his 
fortress, the proprietor became known as " The Gudeman o' 
the Bog." About the close of the eighteenth century the 
morass was drained by the Fourth Duke, who also erected 
the modern portion of the mansion. 

To-day the Castle stands in the midst of a beautifully wooded 
park of some thirteen hundred acres. The gardens are 
exceedingly attractive, being both extensive and exquisitely 



150 GORDON CASTLE 

kept. One of them occupies the site of an old quarry, and 
was formed in the spring of 1836, under the direction of the 
Duchess, who intended it as a surprise to her husband, who, 
however, did not live to see the work. Before leaving the 
gardens in front of the Castle, visitors should ask to be 
directed to the Duchess's Tree, a magnificent lime, the lower 
limbs of which, having been allowed to droop until they 
touched the ground, have rooted and then have grown with 
increased vigour. Elsewhere are clumps of indigenous holly 
trees that attract attention by the closeness of the stems. 



FOR MOTORISTS AND CYCLISTS. 



THE motorist will find repair shops and garages in all 
the principal towns, while the more important 
isolated hotels provide garage and hold stocks of spares 
and petrol. 

Though the undermentioned tour was originally drawn 
up for cyclists, it will be found to include nearly all the 
principal places of interest in the Highlands, and may be 
advantageously followed in fewer stages by motorists. 

Members of the Cyclists' Touring Club will find it to their 
advantage to consult the pages of their own Scottish Road 
Book, but it must be remembered that the great and growing 
use of heavy motor vehicles is having an injurious effect 
upon road surfaces. Many of the vehicles are used for 
carrying the mails, and these make at least one journey 
each way daily. 

The charges for the carriage of cycles on the MacBrayne 
steamers are — 

10 miles and under ..... i/- 

25 .. 2/- 

50 ,, 3/- 

75 ,. 4/- 

100 „ , 5 /- 

and 1/- for each additional 50 miles. Double above rates 
for tandems or motor-cycles. 

The machine must be accompanied by the owner. It will 
only be carried at his risk, and in case of trans-shipment he 
must see to it himself. 



Road Tour in Scotland. 

The following seventeen days' cycling tour in Scotland 
was compiled by the late Mr. W. Kendall Burnett, and is 
reprinted, by permission, from the C.T.C. Monthly Gazette. 

First Day. — Edinburgh to Callander (51 £ miles), via 
Linlithgow (17), Falkirk (24^), Bannockburn (33), Stirling 

151 



152 FOR MOTORISTS AND CYCLISTS 

(35i). Bridge of Allan (38^), Callander (51 1). Surface 
mainly good and fairly level. Objects of interest — Edinburgh : 
Holyrood Palace, Castle, etc. ; Linlithgow : Palace ; Ban- 
nockburn : Field of Battle ; Stirling : Castle, Wallace 
Monument ; Callander : Falls of Bracklinn. 

Second Day. — Callander to Trossachs and Loch Katrine and 
back (16 miles). Thence to Lochearnhead (14J miles). 
Cyclists can make a round (59 miles, of which 18 on steamer) 
by road to Loch Katrine (gi), steamer up loch to Stronach- 
lachar (18 \), no road, road Stronachlachar to Inversnaid, 
on Loch Lomond (23^) ; return same way from Inversnaid 
to Kilmahog, old toll (46), thence to Strathyre (54) and 
Lochearnhead Station (57) and Hotel (59). Surface lumpy 
through Trossachs, with dangerous hill down to Inversnaid. 
Excellent road from Kilmahog to Lochearnhead. The 
scenery through Trossachs is very fine, and, indeed, the 
whole of this day's journey is through a beautiful country. 

Third Day. — Lochearnhead to Crieff (50 miles), via Killin 
Station (3J), Killin Village (yi), Kenmore (23I), Aberfeldy 
(30J), Amulree (37^), Crieff (50). Again fine scenery. Steep 
hill up to Killin Station, but good, level surface along north 
bank of Loch Tay to Kenmore. 

Fourth Day.- — Crieff to Dundee (39I miles) via Methven 
(n), Perth (17^), Inchture (30 J), Dundee (39J). Objects of 
interest — Scone Palace, near Perth, on site of Abbey where 
Scottish kings were crowned ; Tay Bridge at Dundee. 

Fifth Day. — Dundee to Aberdeen (67 miles), via Arbroath 
(17), Montrose (29), Bervie (42), Stonehaven (52), Aberdeen 
(67). Capital surface almost throughout. Objects of in- 
terest — Arbroath Abbey ; Dunnottar Castle (historical), near 
Stonehaven. 

Sixth Day. — Aberdeen to Braemar (58^ miles), via Banchory 
(17), Kincardine O'Neil (25), Aboyne (30), Ballater (41), 
Crathie (49), Braemar (58J). Splendid surface, though a 
little uneven between Ballater and Braemar through Coach 
traffic. Scenery very fine from Banchory onwards. Objects 
of interest — Balmoral Castle, of which a splendid view is 
obtained from the road beside Crathie, Mar Castle and 
Invercauld House at Braemar, and numerous waterfalls 
near Braemar. 

Seventh Day. — Braemar to Dunkeld (47 miles), via Spittal 
of Glenshee (15), Persie Inn (26), Bridge of Cally (29), Blair- 
gowrie (35), Dunkeld (47). A very wild road, with several 
dangerous hills, but the scenery is grand. 

Eighth Day. — Dunkeld to Kingussie- (58 miles), via Pit- 
lochry (12), Blair Atholl (19J), Struan (24), Dalwhinnie (432). 
Kingussie (58). Road undulating, and poor surface mostly. 
Note that there is neither inn nor hotel between Struan and 



FOR MOTORLSTS AND CYCLISTS 153 

Dalwhinnie (a distance of nearly twenty miles of rough 
riding). Objects of interest — Pass of Killiecrankie (between 
Pitlochry and Blair Atholl), Dunkeld Palace, Birnam Hill and 
Wood, near Dunkeld. 

Ninth Day. — Kingussie to Inverness (44 miles), via Avie- 
more (12), Carr Bridge (19^), Inverness (44). Road varies 
with season of year, mostly fair, however ; and surface 
undulating. Passes through some fine scenery. 

Note. — From Inverness a good road runs north to 
John 0' Groats, by way of Beauly, Dingwall, Tain, 
Meikle Ferry, Dornoch and Wick (153! miles). The 
return to Inverness might be made by Thurso, Tongue 
and Lairg (155 miles), or even by Scourie and Lairg 
(220 miles). 

Tenth Day. — Inverness to Fort William (67 miles), via 
Drumnadrochit Hotel (14), Invermoriston Inn (27), Fort 
Augustus (34), Invergarry Inn (41^), Fort William (67). 
General character of road is good, but there are two steep 
hills between Fort Augustus and Drumnadrochit. The road 
skirts Loch Ness and Caledonian Canal most of the way, and 
the views are very fine. Objects of interest — Inverness 
Cemetery, Fort Augustus Monastery. From Fort William 
Ben Nevis (the highest mountain in Great Britain) can 
be easily climbed, but a whole day must be allowed for it. 
The view is glorious on a clear day. 

• Eleventh Day. — Fort William to Oban (40J miles), via 
Corran Ferry (S\), Ballachulish (13^), Duror Inn (i8£), Appin 
(27), Connel Ferry (35I), Oban (40^). Surface a little stony 
and undulating. The ferry boats are large and carry both 
motors and cycles. Ballachulish has fine slate quarries, and 
from here a run can be taken up the famous pass of Glencoe. 
The view from the heights above Oban is magnificent. 

Twelfth Day. — Oban to Crianlarich (42 £ miles), via Tay- 
nuilt (i2£), Dalmally (26), Tyndrum (38), Crianlarich (42J). 
Objects of interest — Dunstaffnage Castle (near Oban), Pass 
of Brander (19 miles from Oban), Kilchurn Castle, and Loch 
Awe, at Dalmally. Road very variable, scenery good. 

Thirteenth Day. — Crianlarich to Glasgow (51 miles), via 
Ardlui (8£), Tarbet (16), Luss (24 \), Dumbarton (^y), Glasgow 
(51 ). Beautiful scenery through Glenfalloch and down Loch 
Lomond, and very few gradients. Ben Lomond is conspicu 
ous on opposite bank of Loch. At Dumbarton visit Castle 
(historical). 

Fourteenth Day. — Glasgow to Ayr (33 miles), via Kilmar- 
nock (21), Ayr (33). Splendid surface and very level. At 
Ayr see Burns's Cottage, and at Kilmarnock Burns Memorial. 

Fifteenth Day. — Ayr to Dumfries (60 miles), vid New 
Cumnock (22^), Sanquhar (34), Thornhill ^46), Dumfries (60). 



154 FOR MOTORISTS AND CYCLISTS 

Good surface and easy gradients. At 42 miles see Drumlanrig 
Castle ; at Sanquhar, castle ruin. 

Sixteenth Day. — Dumfries to Melrose (62^ miles), vid 
Parkgate (9), Beattock (19), Moffat (21), Birkhill (32), Gordon 
Arms Inn (42), Selkirk (55), Abbotsford (59 £), Melrose (62 £). 
Good road on the whole, but some stiff hills. Objects of 
interest — Abbotsford (Sir Walter Scott's house), Melrose 
Abbey. 

Seventeenth Day. — Melrose to Edinburgh (37 miles), vid 
Galashiels (4), Stow (12), Heriot (21), Esbank (31), and Edin- 
burgh (37). Steep hill 15 miles from Edinburgh, and lumpy 
road near the metropolis. Surface otherwise fair. 

For Index see pp. 155-160. 



INDEX 

Where more than one reference is given, the first is the principal. 



Aberdeen, 17-40, 152 
Access, 11 
Albert Basin, 37 
Albyn Place, 32 
Allenvale Cemetery, 36 
Angling, 17, 10, 18 
Art Gallery, 34 
Barracks, 23 
Bathing, 17, 23 
Blue Hill, 39-40 
Boating, 17 
Bridge of Dee, 35-36 
Bridge of Don, New, 24 
Brig o' Balgownie, 24 
Broad Street, 28 
Cab Fares, 17 
Carden Place, 32 
Castle Hill, 23 
Castle Street, 22 
Castle Terrace, 23 
Churches and Chapels, 17 
City Cross, 22 
Climate, 10 
Constitution Street, 23 
Cruickshank Botanic Garden, 

26 
Cycling, 10, 151-4 
Denburn Valley, 31 
Distances, 18 
Don Street, 25 
Duthie Park, 36-7 
Early Closing, 18 
East and West Churches, 

30-31 
Esplanade, 35 
Excursions, 41-54 
Fishing, 18 
Fish Market, 37-8 
Fountainhall Road, 35 
Gallowgate, 28 
Golf, 18, 23, 10, 35, etc. 
Gordon's College, 33-4 
Grammar School, 32 
Gray's School of Art , 3 4 
Guestrow, 30 
Heading Hill, 23 



Aberdeen (continued) — 
History, 19-20 
Holburn Street, 35 
Hotels and Tariffs, '13-16 
Huntley Street, 32 
Justice Street, 23 
King's College, 26-7 
King Street, 23 
Marischal College, 28-30 
Market Days, 18 
Market Hall, 21 
Market Street, 21 
Mitchell Hall, 29 
Mitchell's Hospital, 26 
Mitchell Tower, 29 
Motor-'buses, 18 
Motoring, 10, 41, 151-4 
Municipal Buildings, 21 
Museum, 37 

Music Hall Buildings, 32 
North Pier, 24 
Oriental Gateway, 27 
Park Street, 23 
Picture Houses, 18 
Postal, 18 

Public Library, 33, 18 
Queen's Cross, 32 
Queen's Links, 23 
Railway Station, 18 
Roman Catholic Cathedral, 32 
Rosemount Viaduct, 32 
Royal Infirmary, 33 
St. Andrew's Cathedral, 25 
St. Machar Cathedral, 25-26 
School of Domestic Science, 

24, 25 
Schoolhill, 33 
Situation, 18 
Skene Street, 32 
Statues : Burns, 33 

Duke of Gordon, 22 

General Gordon, 34 

King Edward VII, 31 

Prince Albert, 33 

Queen Victoria, 21, 30 

Wallace, 33 



156 



INDEX 



Aberdeen, (continued). 

Steamboats, 18, 12 

Taxi-cabs, 17 

Theatres, 18, 33 

Tolbooth, 22 

Town Hall,' 2 1 

Town's Churchyard, 30 

Tramways, 18, 34 

Trinity (or Trades) Hall, 31 

Union Bridge, 31 

Union Street, 21 

Union Terrace Gardens, 31 

University, The, 26, 28 

Victoria Bridge, 35 

Victoria Park, 35 

Wellington Bridge, 35 

Westburn Park, 35 
Aberdour, 54 

Abergeldie Castle, 73-74, 78 
Aberlour, 104-5 
Abernethy Forest, 113 
Aboyne, 62-3, 94 
Advie, 106 
Alford, 93, 41 
Alford Valley, 91-2, 41 
Alyth, 87 
Angling, 10, 17, 45, 51, 58, 62, 

122-3 
Auchindachy, 102 
Auchindoun, 103 
Auchmacoy, 46 
Auchterless, 124 
Aviemore, 115-116, 87 

Badenyox, 94 
Balbegno Castle, 44 
Balfluig Castle, 92 
Ballater, 66-67, 95, 72, 41 
Ballater, Pass of, 67 
Ballaterach, 66 
Ballindalloch, 105, 85, 86, 96 
Ballochbuie Forest, 78 
Balmoral, 76-78, 75, 72 

Ballater to, 72-75. 77~8 
Balvenie Castle, 102 
Banchory, 58-59 
Banff, 126-129, 41, 133 
Bass of Inverurie, 91 
Ben Aigan, 104 
Ben More, in 
Bennachie, 98, 41 
Ben Rinnes, 103 
Ben Muich Dhui (or Macdhui), 

114, 82 
Bin of Cullen, 136, 147 



Binn Hill, 119 

Birkhall, 69 

Blacksboat, 105 

Blair Atholl, 86 

Blairgowrie, 85 

Blairs College, 56 

Blue Hill, 39-40 

Boat of Garten, 114-115, 117, 

Boddam, 50, 51, 41 

Bow Fiddle, 136 

Boyndie, 129 

Boyne Castle, 133 

Braco, 101 

Braemar, 80-2, 95, 117, 152 

Branderburgh, 147 

Brechin, 87, 71 

Bridge of Alvah, 128 

Bridge of Brown, 112 

Bridge of Cally, 85 

Bridge of Clunie, 81 

Bridge of Ess, 64 

Bridge of Feugb, 59 

Bridge of Gairn, 69, 73 

Bridge of Lui, 88 

Bridge of Muick, 68, 77 

Bridge of Potarch, 63, 64 

Bridge of Tanner, 64 

Bridge of Tullich, 70 

Bronie, The, 45 

Broomhill, 114 

Broxy Burn, The, 136 

Brucklay Castle, 53 

Buchaam, 94 

Buchan, 45-54, 4* 

Buchan Ness Lighthouse, 50 

Buckie, 137-8, 41 

Buckpool, 138 

Bullers of Buchan, 49, 52 

Burnett Park, 58 

Caird Young's Loup, 64 
Cairnbathie, 61 
Cairnbulg, 54 
Cairnford Bridge, 123 
Cairngorm, 114, 117 
Cairn of Remembrance, 78 
Cairn Taggart, 84 
Cairnie Junction, 101, 126 
Cairnwell, 85 
Calcots, 135 
Cambus o' May, 66 
Candacraig, 69 
Carlogie House, 64 
Carr Bridge, in 



INDEX 



157 



Carron, 105 

Castle Forbes, 92 

Castle Fraser, 91 

Castle Grant, 109-110, 106 

Castle Newe, 94 

Castle Roy, 114 

Causar, The, 113 

Cave Arthur, 46 

Chapel Manaar, 73 

Charlestown, 39 

Charter Chest, 79 

Christ's Kirk, Hill of, 100 

Clachanturn, 74, 78 

Claehnaben, 59 

Climate, 10 

Clothing, 13, 

Clova, 71, 87 

Cluny Castle, 92 

Cock Bridge, 95 

Collieston, 46-47, 49 

Colonel's Bed, The, 83 

Colquhonny Castle, 94 

Convals, 103 

CorgarfT Castle, 95 

Corndavon Lodge, 69 

Corse House and Castle, 94 

Coulard Hill, 147 

Coull Castle, 94 

Covesea Caves of, 148 

Covesea, 146 

Coylum Bridge, 88, 117 

Cradle Rock, 103 

Craig Cailleach, 68 

Craig Castle, 100 

Craig Clunie, 79 

Craigellachie Rock, 104-5, 115 

Craigendarroch, 68 

Craighall, 85 

Craigievar Castle, 93 

Craigmyle, 60 

Craig Tiribeg, 112 

Crathes, 57 

Crathie Church, 74-75 

Creag Choinnich, 80 

Creag Ghuibhais, 77 

Creag Mam Ban, 78 

Creag Phiobaidh, 77 

Cromdale, in, 106 

Crovie, 131 

Cruden Bay, 47-48, 41 

Cullen, 134-6, 41 

Culs, 56 

Culsh Burn, The, 51 

Culter, 56 

Cycling, 10, 151-4 



Dalfad, 69 

Daldownie, 69 

Dalspersie Castle, 93 

Deeside, 55-88, 41 

Den of Kildrummy, 94 

Derry Lodge, 88 

Dess, 61 

Dess, Slog of, 63 

Desswood House, 63 

Deveron Bridge, 123 

Devil's Point, 88 

Dinnet, 65, 41 

Donside, 89-96, 41 

Don, The, 89, 41 

Doune, Hill of, 129 

Doune of Invernochty, 94 

Drainie, 148 

Dreggie Hill, no 

Druim Dearg, 87 

Drum, 56, 41 

Drummuir, 102 

Dubh Loch, 85 

Dufftown, 102-4, 4 1 

Duffus Castle, 145 

Dulnain Bridge, in 

Dun Buy, 49 

Dunnideer Hill, 100 

Dunnottar Castle, 42-44, 41 

Duthill, in 

Dyce Junction, 45, 89 

Easter Balmoral, 78 
Eden Castle, 125 
Edzell, 44-45, 41. 71 
Elgin, 140-5, 139, 41 
Ellon, 45-6, 51, 41 

Falls of Corriemulzie, 83 

Falls of Gar await, 84 

Fare, Hill of, 58, 59 

Fenella's Castle, 44 

Fettercairn, 44, 41 

Fetternear, 91 

Findlater Castle, 136, 133 

Findochty, 137 

Findon, 42 

Fochabers, 148, 138, 41 

Fordyce Castle, 136 

Forglen, 125 

Forter Castle, 87 

Forvie, 47 

Foveran Burn, The, 45 

Fraserburgh, 53 

Fungle Glen, 63 

Fyvie, 124 



158 



INDEX 



Gairn Castle, 69 
Gairnshiel Lodge, 69 
Gairn, The, 69 
Gamrie Head, 130 
Gannochy Bridge, 44 
Gardenstovvn, the, 131 
Garioch, 100 
Garmouth, 139, 41 
Gartly, 100 
Garvault, the, 113 
Gauldwell Castle, 103 
Geallaig Hill, 69, 73 
Giants' Chair, 103 
Girdleness Lighthouse, 39 
Glas Maol, 85 
Glassel, 60 
Glen — 

Beg, 85, in 

Clunie, 85 

Dee, 88 

Derry, 117 

Feshie, 117 

Fingle, 63 

Finzie, 72, 69 

Gairn, 69 

Gelder, 78 

Geusachan, 118 

Lui, 118 

Mark, 72 

Muick, 71, 73, 77 

Shee, 85 

Tanner, 64 

Tilt, 86, 87 
Glenbucket Castle, 94 
Glengairn Church, 69 
Glenlivet, 106, 96 
Glenmore Forest, 116 
Glenmuick House, 68-9 
Golf, 18, 23, 10, 45, 47, 52, etc. 
Gordon Castle, 149-150, 138 
Grange, 101, 125 
Grannoch Hill Wood, 136 
Grantown, 107-9, 85, 86 
Greyhope Bay, 39 

Haddo House, 46 
Hallforest Castle, 90 
Harlaw 99, 20, 21 
Hatton, 47, 41 
Hatton Castle, 124 
Hatton of Cruden, 47 
Haughs of Cromdale, 106 
Hawklaw, 48 
Hell's Lum, 132, 49 
Hill Climbing, 59 



Hotels and Tariffs, 13-16 
Howe of the Mearns, 44 
Howe, The, 92 
Huntly, 119-123, 101, 126 

Inchrory, 95 
Innes House, 139 
Insch, 100 
Insh Church, 117 
Inverallan, no 
Inveramsay, 99, 124 
Invercauld, 79 
Inverdruie, 116 
Inverey, 83 
Inverugie, 51 
Inverurie, 90-1, 98, 41 

Keig, 92 
Keith, 101-102 
Keith Hall, 90 
Kemnay, 91, 41 
Kennethmont, 100 
Kerloch, 59 

Kildrummy Castle, 93-94 
Kinaldie, 89, 41 
Kincardine O'Neil, 60, 63 
Kincraig, 117 
King Edward, 125 
Kingston-on-Spey, 139 
Kingussie, 88, 152 
Kininvie House, 103 
Kinnaird Head, 53 
Kinrara House, 117 
Kintore, 90, 41 
Kirkney Glen, 123 
Kirk of Birnie, 146 
Kirkton, 54 
Kirkton of Glenisla, 87 
Kirriemuir, 71, 87 
Knock Castle, 77 
Knock Hill, 126 

Ladies' Walk, no 
Lady Hill, 141 
Ladysbridge, 126 
Laigh o' Moray, 147 
Lar*ig Ghru Pass, 117 
Laurencekirk, 44, 41 
Lecht, The, 95 
Lethendrie Castle, 111 
Linn of Brown, 112 
Linn of Corriemulzie, 83 
Linn of Dee, 83 
Linn of Muick, 68 
Linn of Quoich, 82 



INDEX 



159 



Linn of Ruthrie, 105 
Lion's Cave, 50 
Lion's Face Rock, 80 
Little Brig, 123 
Loch — 

Aboyne, 63 

an-Dorb, 112 

Builg, 69, 85, 86 

Callater, 84 

Davan, 65 

an-Eilean, 116, 88 

Gamhna, 116, 117 

Insh, 117 

Kinord, 65 

Lee, 72 

Loirston, 39 

Muick, 71 

Park, 103 

Soy, 133 
Lochnagar, 71, 78, 84 
Logie, 100 
Longhaven, 50, 41 
Longside, 51 
Lord Huntly's Cave, no 
Lossiemouth, 146-48 
Lumphanan, 61 
Lynwilg, 117, 87, 88 

Macbeth's Stone, 61 

Wall, 61 
MacDonald, George, 121-2 
Macduff, 129-130, 124, 125 
Maiden Stone, 99 
Mar Lodge, 83 
Maud Castle, 60 

Junction, 51, 53 
Meikle Stane o' Cluny, 79 
Melrose, 154 
Menaway Range, 92 
Mill of Clunie, 81 
Mill o' Tifty, 124 
Milltimber, 56 
Mintlaw, 51 
Moat Hill, 48 
Monega Hill, 87 
Monymusk, 92, 41 
Moray, 140 

Moray Firth Coast, 133, 41, 125 
Mormond Hill, 53 
Morrone Hill, 82 
Mortlach Church, 103 
Mortlich, Hill of, 63 
Morven, 70, 65, 94 
Mossat, 94 
Motoring, 10, 41, 151-4 



Mountaineering, 13 
Mount Blair, 85 
Mount Keen, 64 
Muchalls, 42 
Muckerach, in 
Muckle Cross, 141 
Muir of Dinnet, 65 
Muir of Inver, 78 
Murtle, 56 

National Harbour of Refuge 

52 
Needle's Eye, 132 

Rock, 130 
Nethybridge, 113-114 
Newmachar, 41 
Newton House, 100 
Nigg, 38 
Normandykes, 56 

Old Meldrum, 90 
Ord Bain, 117 
Oyne, 100, 41 

Pannanich Wells, 68 
Park, 57 

Pearl Fishing, Ellon, 45 
Peel Bog, 61 
Pennan, 132 
Peterculter, 56 
Peterhead, 51-52, 50 
Philorth Bridge, 54 

House, 53 
Pict's House, 94 
Pitcaple, 99, 41 
Pitmedden, 89 
Pitsligo Castle, 54 
Plaidy, 125 

Pluscarden Priory, 145 
Polchar, 117 
Polquhollick, 67 
Pools of Dee, 88, 117 
Port Enrol, 48 
Portessie, 137 
Portgordon, 138 
Portknockie, 136-7 
Portlethen, 42 
Portsoy, 133-4, 41 

Queen's Drive, 80 
Queen's Well, 72 

Railway Excursions, 41-54 
Railway Routes, 11-12, 125, 9 
Ravenscraig Castle, 51 



160 



INDEX 



Red Craig of Craigendinnie, 

64 
Red Hill of Corrennie, 92 
Road Tour of Scotland, 151-4 
Roman Camp, 56 
Rosehearty, 54 
Rothiemay, 10 1 
Rothiemurchus, 116 
Rothienorman, 124 

Sandend, 133 
Satan's Den, 60 
Scaurs Rocks, 48 
Scoltie, 59 
St. Combs, 54 
Sea Routes, 12 
Seaton, 25 
Seatown, 134, 147 
Slains Castle, 48-49, 47 
Speyside, 41, 98 
Spey, The, 97-98 
Spey Bay, 138 
Spynie Loch, 146 
Spynie Palace, 146, 139 
Standing Stones, 89 
Stirling, 50 
Stonehaven, 42, 41 
Stotfield, 147 
Strachan, 59 
Strathdon, 94, 41 
Strathspey, 97-118 
Strath Girnock, 77 
Strichen, 53 

Tap o' Noth, 100 
Tarfside, 71, 72 
Tarlair, 130 
Tarland, 94 
Tarty, The, 45 
Terpersie Castle, 93 



Three Rivers Tour, 41 
Tillyfourie, 92, 41 
Tillymorgan Hill, 100 
Tillynaught, 126 
Tilquhillie Castle, 57 

HiU, 59 
Time Tables, 12 
Tolmount, 87 
Tomintoul, 95-6, 72, 85, 86, 105, 

112 
Tor Alvie, 117 
Torphins, 60 
Torry, 38 

Towie Barclay Castle, 124 
Towie Castle, 94 
Troup Head, 132 
Tulchan Lodge, 106 
Tullochgorum, 114 
Turriff, 125 
Twa Een, 49 

Udny, 45, 41 
Urie, The, 91 
Urquhart, 139 

Vale of Alford, 91-92, 41 
Victoria Bridge, Braemar, 83 
View Point, no 
Vitrified Fort, Tap o' Noth, 100 

Wardhouse, 100 
War tie, 124 
Whale's Mouth, 136 
Whinnyfold, 50 
Whitehills, 129 
Whitehouse, 41 
Whitestone, 59 
Wine Tower, 54 

Vthan, The, 45 



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WHERE TO STAY. 

Hotel, 

Hydropathic 
Establishment 

and 

Boarding House 
Directory. 





Index 



INDEX 



Aberdovev 

Aberystwyth 

Ambleside 

Barmouth 

Bath ... 

Belfast ... 

Bettws-y-coed 

Bexhill... 

Bournemouth 

Bovey Trace}' 

Bowness-on-W 

mere... 
Bridlingtoa 
Brighton 
Bristol ... 
Bude ... 
Buxton... 
Cheltenham 
Clevedon 
Clovelly 
Colwyn Bay 
Cromer ... 



nder- 



PAGE 

13 I Douglas 
12 Droitwich 

'3 Dulverton 



M 



Eastbourne 
Edinburgh 



1 



!2, 23 

• 23 

'3. 2 4 

• -4 



English Lakes 13, 16, 26, 

2S, 32, 33, tQ 
5, 16 ° 

, Exmouth 
16 

j (3 Falmouth 
Felixstowe 
1 6 Folkestone 
16 Fowey ... 

16. 17 ' Freshwater Bay 
1 y J Gloucester 

17, 18 I Gorleston 



ig, 20 
20 



Grasmere 
Harrogate 
Hastings 
Heme Bay 

21 Hunstanton 

22 Ilfracombe 





24 


2 4. 


25 




25 




26 




26 




26 




26 




26 


26, 


28 


27. 


28 




29 




28 




28 


30, 


3i 







PAGE 




1 AGE 


Isle of Man 




22, 


40 


Paignton .. 45, 46 


Isle of Wight 26, 


I s - 


49. 


5° 


Penzance 


.. 46 








59 


Port Erin 


.. 4 & 


Keswick 




32. 


33 


Porthcaw 


.. 47 


Launceston 






33 


Portree... 


•• 47 


Leamington 




I, 


33 


Rhos-on-Sca ... 


21 


Littlehampton... 
Llandrindod We 
Llandudno 
Llanfairfechan... 


lis 


34. 


33 
33 
35 
35 


Rhyl 

Rothbury 

St. Austell 

St. I\es 

St. Leonards-on-Sea . 


.. 47 

.. 47 
.. 47 
.. 48 
.. 20 


Llangammarch Wells... 


35 


Sandown 


.. 48 


Loch Lomond . . 






36 


Scarborough ... 


.. 49 


London... 




'i, 


36 


Seaton ... 


.. 49 


Looe 






3G 


Shanklin 


-1'), 5° 


Lowestoft 






36 


Sidmoutn 


.. 50 


Lyme Regi- 






37 


Southampton ... 


.. 50 


Lymingtorj 






37 


Southport 


.. 50 


Lynmouth 




37- 


38 


Stratford-on-Avon 


.. .50 


Lynton... 


38, 


39, 


iO 


Teignmouth 


•• 5i 


Malvern 




40, 


41 


Tenby. 


•• 5i 


Margate 
Matlock 




41. 


4' 

-12 


Torquay 52. 53. 54, = 

57 
Towyn 


5 56, 
58, 59 
• • 59 


Minehead 






4 2 


Truro ... 


■• 59 


Monmouth 






4 2 


W-ntnor 


•• 59 


Mortehoe 






43 


Weymouth 


•• 59 


Mundesley 






42 


Whaiey Bridge 


22 


Newcastle-on-Ty 


ne 




4 3 


Windermere ... 


•• 59 


New Forest 






37 


Woody Bay 


.. 38 


Newquay 


43. 


44. 


45 


Woolacombe ... 


•• 43 


Oxford 






,] =: 


Worcester 


so 



Aberystwyth 



THE WELSH RIVIERA and 
THE TOURIST PARADISE. 

For Renewed Health and Vigour, 
Spend your Holidays in 

ABERYSTWYTH 

(ON THE OCEAN COAST). 
The Queen of Welsh Watering Places. 

Golf. Tennis. 

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Bowling. Fishing. 

GRANDEST SCENERY T '„" E BRITISH ISLES. 

Home of the University of Wales and the National Library. 

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Official Guide, List of Hotels & Apartments. 
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EXPRESS TRAINS BY G.W.R. 



Aberdovev — Ambleside 



13' 



Aberdovey, N. Wales-TREFEDDIAN 



HOTEL. 



Adjoining Celebrated 18-hole Golf 
Course. Elevated Position, facing 
Sea. S.W. Aspect. Standing in its Own Grounds of 
1 8 acres. Garage. Elec. Light. "Phone No. 13. 



AMBLESIDE. 




LAKELANDS PRIVATE HOTEL 



WATERHEAD. 

Private Frontage 
Lake. 



to 



Private Garage. 
'Phone Ambleside 102. 

E. W. TOMLINSON, 

Proprietor. 



AMBLESIDE. 

GLEN ROTHAY 

Private Hotel, 
f? v d a i_ . 

BEAUTIFUL Wooded 
Grounds, overlooking 
Rydal Water. Elec. Light. 
Boating, Fishing, Bathing. 
Goli Links, walking dis- 
tance. Winter T a r i fi. 
Coaches from Windermere 
Station. A.A. & R.A.C. 
'Phone Ambleside 43. 
1 els., " Glenrothav, 

tie." 




Ambleside- QUEENS HOTEL 

First-Class Family, Tourist and Commercial. Every Comfort. Excel- 
lent Cuisine and Courteous Service. Electric Light. Moderate 
Tariff. Appointed A.A., M.U. and R.A.C. Large GARAGE. 
Tel. 13. Mr. & Mrs. J. E SAVAGE, Resident Proprietors. 

AMBLESIDE, English Lakes DIXON'S WANSFELL 

TflWFR PRIVATE HOTEL.— Most Central for Visitors and 
I UlwCil Tourists. Coaching. Climbing. Boating and Fish- 
big. Motoring. Electric Light Throughout. Every Comfort. 
Moderate and Inclusive Terms. Listed Hotel for R.A.C. & A.C.U. 
•Phone 95. Miss DIXON, Proprietress. 

Ambleside-Robinson's Temp. Hotel, ^S^g^ST 

for all Excursions, Coaching, Climbing, Cycling, &c. Parties Catered 
for. Hot and Cold Luncheons. Teas. 



14 Barmouth — Bath 



BARMOUTH. — Situated in Own Grounds overlooking: 

Sea. Facing- due South. Spacious Lounge. — — \att\f f\^~ 

Bedrooms overlook Sea. _— *■— ""Tm 1 PH HOtJ± 



us overlook Sea. -— ■ - a 1 

Yi T£*J^JZ~--, Golf. Ten 



Separate Tables, 

Golf. Tennis & Croquet. Garage. 

'Phone 85. Proprietress. 

Barmouth MOUNT ARGUS HOTEL. 

Under New Management. Ideally Situated, with Glorious Views of 

Sea and Mountains. Billiard Room. Tennis Lawns. Electric 

Light. Excellent Cuisine. Garage. Every Modern Convenience. 

Apply Illustrated Tariff, PROPRIETOR. 

'Phone 37. Tels., " Barnard, Barmouth." 

Barmouth-Cors-y-gedol & Marine Hotels. ^^'3 

the Sea, with South-west aspect. Excellent Cuisine. 

'Phone No. 2. For Terms, apply to MANAGER. 

DarmOUlQ-MIN-Y-MOR. Guefts. HeaUh&pfeasurrBall^m* 
Excellent Cuisine. Separate Tables. Every Comfort. Illus. Tariff. 
Inclusive Terms from 7/6 daily, according to Season. LLOYD. 

A ~ ~~ -±-— — — ~~ — — — -~ - ^ 



BA'g'H. 

THE PULTENEY HOTEL. 

The Most Palatial Hotel in the Queen of English Spas. 

Patronised by the most Distinguished Personages. Combines 
Artistic Refinement with Homely Comfort, and a quiet atmos- 
phere of Cultured Repose. South Aspect, and sheltered from N. 
& E. winds. Luxuriously and Elegantly Appointed. Over 200 
Bedrooms. The Pulteney is far-famed for its Priceless Collection 
of Paintings by the Great Masters, and Rare Specimens of Italian 
and French Sculptures, Bronzes, etc. 'Phone Bath 1281 (3 lines). 
P. & W. JACKMAN, Managing Directors. 



- v ~ ^ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ^^^ ^ 
Bath-WESTBOURNE PRIVATE HOTEL, ggS,. 

First-class. Centrally Situated. Close to the Abbey, R. C. Church, 
Grand Pump Room, and Institution Gardens. Forty Bedrooms 
(with Gas Fires). Separate Tables. Smoking Room. Lounge. 
Baths (H. & C). Good Cuisine. Moderate Charges. Tariff on 
application. 'Phone 1663. M. J. G ITT INS, Proprietress. 

Bath CROSVE^R HOTEL. ^ZiiTsuSS: 

Centre of Historic City of Bath. Opposite Institution Gardens. 
Visitors staying at Hotel have free access. Grand Pump Room and 
Old Roman Baths, three minutes' 'walk. Gas Fires in Bedrooms. 
Separate Tables. Smoking Room. Lounge. Baths (H. & C). 
Electric Light Throughout. Good Cuisine. Moderate Charges. 
I'lmnp 'pp.- Tariff from M. 1. GITT1NS. 

BATH PRATT'S HOTEL 

On the South Parade. Close to the Baths, Abbey. 
Garage, Private Gardens and Tennis Courts. 
'Phone 310. Terms on Application. L. E. PRATT. 



Bath— Belfast — Bettws-y-coed— Bexhill 1 5 

Bath FRANCIS' HOTELS, K 

(Fully Licensed) and Bennett Street, two High-class 
Residential Hotels. Centrally Situated. Moderate 
Terms. Garage. 'Phone Bath 674 & 675. Tels., 
"Francis, Bath." E. POXTER & SONS, Proprietors. 

Bath Christopher Hotel Ltd.i&Swffl: 

Close to Alibnv. Baths nnd Stations. Moderate Tariff. Good 
n<m", Telephone 30?. Tup Misv< ROBINSON'. Manageresses. 

Batt-Edgar Private Hotel, ^ S^ e r Su c r 

venient for Baths and Grand Pump Room. Every Comfort. 
Moderate Terms. 'Phone 25. JOHN HOOPER, Proprietor. 

Dfttll rFlV8Lt6 D%. liStftD., Situated cm Lewi.' Conwoient^for 
Baths, Pump Room, Golf Links. Refined and Homelike. Smoke 
Room. 'Phone 429. Mrs. W. LAWRENCE Proorietrpss 



Bath DUKE STREET HOUSE fJ^sSr. 

Five minutes from Abbey, Pump Room and Baths. Excellent 
Cuisine. Terms Mod. 'Phone 1473. Mrs. BEARD, Prop'tress. 

BATH, Combe Down-NORTH CROFT H£"SSa£ 

ation, 700 ft. above Sea Level. Nr. Golf Links. Extensive View of Sur- 
rounding Country. Inclusive Terms. Miss HERBERT, Prop'tress. 

Belfast Robinson's Temp. Hotel, &SS£"£i 

Family. Over 40 Rooms. Electric Light. Central for Railways and 
Steamers. Apply ror Tariff. 'Phone 2141. I els.. " Robinson's Hotel." 

BETTWS-Y-COED, N. WALES-CLAN ABER HOTEL 

Beautifully andCentrallySituated. Family and Tourist Hotel. New 
Lounge. Elec. Light. Exten. Garage Free to Hotel Visitors. Ex. 
Cuisine. Own Farm and Garden Produce. Billiards. Fishing 
Tickets Obtainable. Close to Tennis and Croquet. Terms 
Moderate. Officially Appointed R.A.C., A.A. 'Phone 8. 

Tels., "Glanaber" Mrs. A EVANS, Resident Proprietress. 



BEXHILL-ON-SEA. 

NORMANHURST HOTEL 

(Fully Licensed). 

FINEST POSITION ON SEA FRONT. THE MOST COMFORTABLE 

IN BEXHILL. Renowned for Cuisine and Service. Central Heating 

Private Sitting Rooms face the Sea. Passenger Lift to all Floors 

Officially Appointed A.A. & R.A.C. 

Tel. No. 68. \V. L. COONEY. 



Bexhill— THE ARUNDEL EVY™ 

Park Avenue. Occupies an Ideal Position on Sea Front. One 
minute from Park, Tennis, Bowls and Open Air Swimming Bath. 
Sea Bathing from the House. Terms from 2* to 4J guineas, 
according to Season and Room. Special " Winter Terms 

'Phone 638. Miss W. OKEY, Proprietress. 



16 Bexhill — B'mouth — Bowness — Bridlington — Brighton 

Bexhill-ALBANY HOTEL ^^^g^rS; 

Cooden, Schools and Golf Links. Open Throughout the Year. 
'Phone 121. M. E. SKIXXER. Pp-p-ir-tr^s. 



•EVER 3 LEY.' 
Durley Road. 

Tennis, Billiards. Elec. 

Lig'it. Stands in its 
Own Grounds. 



"LOUGHTONHURST." 
West Cliff Gardens. 

36 Bedrooms. 4 Public. 
Gas Fires. Elec. Light. 
'FOOD REFORM ONLY.' 



"SILVER HOW." 
West Cliff Gardens. 

On the Cliffs. Gas 
Fires. Electric Eight. 

Terms from £2 2 0. 



BOURNEMOUTH. Proprietors : Mr. & Mrs. HUME. Apply to Manager 



Bournemouth — CRAG HALL 

Dfll/ato Unto I West Cliff). Terms on application to 
rMwCttg WHCI Mr. ft Mrs. W. L. HIXE. Proprietors. 

Bournemouth-Boscombe Grange K*53£-i£?3£ 

Links, &c. Terms from £3 33. Tels., " Ravson, Boscombe Grange, 
B'mouth." Phone B'mouth 2131. Miss RAYSOX. Prop'tress. 

BOVEY TRACEY, Devon, Central for Dartmoor- 
MARLBOROUGH HOTEL 

(Unlicensed . An Ideal Winter or .Summer Residence. Highly 
Recommended. Xear Station and Church. Electric Light. 
Sanitation Certified. Central Heating. Xoted for Cuisine and 
Comfort. T-hone Bovey 59. Tariff, address PROPRIETORS. 

Bowness-on-Windermere-CRANLEIGH iS^SS 

for Lakes and Pier. Central Heating Electric Light Throughout. 
Sep arate Tables. Gara ge. Miss P.. M. WALTERS . 

Bridlington-" ASTORIA '' 

P T I V3.t G H Ot 6 I . Front'" Clo'seTo Prints 
■ ■ HHI.V ■■WbWlB p arad e and Harbour. 

Moderate Tariff. 'Phone Xo. 187. Tels., " Astoria, Bridlington." 
A. & P. MASSA. Proprietors. 

Bridlington — MANCHESTER 

PRIVATE HOTEL. Facing Ocean. Magnificent Views of Flam- 
borough Head and Piers. Overlooking Prince's Parade. Favourite 
Hotel for Golfers. Large Garage and 5 Hard Tennis Courts 
adjoining Hotel. Central Heating. Electric Light. Excellent 
Cuisine and Service. 'Phone Xo. 226. W. L. GURXELL. 



Brighton THE BERKELEY^ 



'RIVATE 
I0TEL. 

FINEST POSITION ON FRONT. Between West Pier and Lawns. 
Opposite King Edward Memorial. All Public Rooms face Sea. Full- 
size Billiard Table (Thurston). Comfirtable Smoking Room. Terms 
from 4 guineas. Week-ends from 27/6. Tels., " Berkeley, Brighton." 
'Phone 5137. Mr. ft Mrs. L. E. HOOKWAV. Proprietors 

Brighton NORTHUMBERLAND 

■J HI 1 1 ft yp | Facing Sea. Board-residence from 

flMLL nil I tL. 12 6 Per day, or 3j gns. per week 

■■""■■ ■■*» ■ ■■"■ inclusive. Bedrooms with H. &C. 
Water & Gas Fires. Every Modern Comfort & Best Possible English 
Meals. For Tariff and Guaranteed Menus, apply W. L. C, Manager. 



Bristol HYDRO, 



Brighton — Bristol — B ude 1 7 

Brighton-BUR LEIGH HALL 

PRIVATE HOTEL, King's Road.— Premier Position on Sea Front, 
between West Pier and Hove Lawns. Terms from 3£ guineas. 
Under Personal Supervision of Proprietors. 
'Phone 4581. Mr. & Mrs. A. DAVIS. 

BRIGHTON (Hove) -ST. CATHERINE'S LODGE 

PRIVATE HOTEL, Kingsway. A High-class Establishment 

Beautifully Situated. Close to the Celebrated Hove Lawns and 
Directly Facing Sea. Central Heating. Hot and Cold Water in 
all Bedrooms. Private Tennis and Croquet Lawn. Illustrated 
Tariif on application. 'Phone Hove 3404. 
RESIDENT PROPRIETOR. 

BRIGHTON (Hove) LANGLEY 

UnilCC BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT, 118, Lans- 

H| IiNF downePlace. Well-appointed and Comfortable. 

** ** Few minutes from Hove Sea. Front. Large 

and Lofty Bedrooms. Recently Enlarged. Electric Light 

Throughout. 'Phone 2330. 

HOYE ASHLEY LODGE, The Drive. 

SELECT PRIVATE HOTEL. 

Moderate Term s. T elephone No. 690 Hove. 

COLLEGE GREEN. Comfort. 

Convenience. Consideration. 
Extensive Turkish Baths and every Electrical Remedy. Resident 
Physician. Wireless. Central Heating. Terms from 3 guineas. 
Garage. Night Porter. 'Phone 1851. Tels., " Hydro, Bristol.' 
Illustrated Tariff. MANAGERESS. 

BUDE, Cornwall. ^^K^* 

Premier Position. Within 200 yards^^^^VN^Y^ 
of Bathing Beach. Adjon-rinsr^"*'^^. 
Golf Links and ^CiXV 

Unsurpassed Cuisine, 
Inclusive Terms. 
"Under Personal Management of 

RESIDENT PROPRIETOR. 

BUDE ERDISTON Boarding Estab. 

Facing South. Adjoining Golf Links, Tennis Courts, Beach, &c. 
First-class Cuisine. Electric Light. Moderate Inclusive Terms. 
(Special Winter Terms). Mild Climate in Winter. Personal 
Supervision. Car for Hire. GARAGE. 'Phone 96. 
Also "PENTARGAN." Falmouth. 
Mrs. GEORGE BANBURY, Proprietress. 

BEST FOR THE JOURNEY 

THE WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

Series, 1926-27] — 



Tennis. 'Phone 43. 



«*£ 



1 8 



Bude — Buxton 



Facing Sea 



Cornwall 

. Own Farm 



First-class Family and Tourist. 



-&.<> 



rp^Sji. 



&J*S 



Officially Appointed R.A.C. and A.A, 
ie5Bude. G. BREN" DON, Resident Proprietor. 



Bude, North Cornwall-N OR FOLK HOTEL, 

Family and Tourist (Unlicensed). Few minutes 
from Golf Links, Tennis Courts, G.P.O. and Sea. 
Central Position. Moderate Terms. 'Buses pass the 
door to meet all trains. Tels., "Norfolk, Bude." 
'Phone 108. Mrs. GILBERT. Proprietress. 

Bude, N. Cornwall— HAWARDEN HOUSE, 

CROOKLETS. Situated on Sea Front, not far from Station and 
facing Golf Links. Large Dining (Separate Tables) and Drawing 
Rooms, Comfortable Bedrooms, Hot and Cold Baths, Electric 
Light and the Best of Cooking. Terms Moderate. Personal 
Supervision. One minute from Garage. 

Miss LARK, Proprietress. 



BUXTON. 




BUXTON HYDRO HOTEL. 

Official Hotel to the R.A.C, A.A. and A.C.U. 

IF it is Comfort. Excellent Cuisine and Convenience of Situation choose 
the Buxton Hydro Hotel. With over 260 Rooms and Three Large 
Dining Rooms there is Accommodation for upwards of 400 Guest;. Hot and 
Cold Water in Bedrooms. Radiators. If it is Dancing, a Ballroom with 
one of the Finest Floors in the Country — if it is a "Cure," a Complete 
Suite of Hydropathic and Electric Baths. Garage. Heated Lock-ups. 
Repair Shop. Withal, a Moderate and Inclusive 'lariff. 

For full particulars write for Illustrated Booklet ' A Study in Comfort ' to 
Manager, Buxton Hydro Hotel, Buxton. 

Buxton LIMEHURST HOTEL 

MANCHESTER RD. Beautifully 

Situated. S.W. Aspect. Extensive 

9 Premises. 5 mins. from New Golf Links, 

Station, Pavilion, Baths & Pump Room. Large Garden. Lounge. 

Terms Moderate. 'Phone 481. Misses DOUGHTY, Prop'tresses. 



Buxton 



19 



CRESCENT HOTEL 



BUXTO 



Officially Appointed Hotel to Royal Automobile Club, Automobile Association, 
Motor Union, A.C-U. and Automobile Touring Club of America. 




^"HIS First-class Hotel occupies the best situation, 
Vl/ being near the Railway Stations, and connected by 
Covered Colonnade with the Baths, Wells, Pavilion- 
Gardens, Opera House, &c. Buxton Golf Links one 
mile from the Hotel. The St. Ann's Well is immedi- 
ately opposite the Hotel. Table d'Hote at 7 p.m. in the 
Splendid Dining Room (one of the finest in the Kingdom). 



GARAGE. 



PETROL. 



Public Dining, Drawing, Lounge, Billiard, Smoking, 
and Reading Rooms. 

ELECTRIC PASSENGER LIFT. 

Electric Light in all Rooms. 



EXCELLENT CUISINE. 



CHOICE WINES AND CIGARS. 



C. J. SMILTER, Resident Proprietor. 

Telegraphic Address : 

"Crescent. Buxton." TELEPHONE No. 20. 

TERMS MODERATE AND INCLUSIVE. 



Buxton — Cheltenham 



BUXTON. 




The BRUNSWICK h££h<**u 

Highly Recommended. Central Position. Garage Near. 
Excellent Entertaining Rooms. Electric Light Throughout. 
Central Heating. 'Phone 45. Mr. & Mrs. S. D. GENT. 

mi ¥> *?■ rv^Ar*^ First-class Private Hotel, 

Tl\e JO tUrUK L) st. john-s road. 



On the Level. Full South Aspect. 
Grounds, overlooking the Gardens. 
New Golf Links. 



Standing in its Own 
Five minutes from 
'Phone 541. 



Buxton GLARENIONT PRIVATE 



St. John's Road. Two minutes from Stations, 
Baths and Shops. Overlooking Gardens. On 
the Level. Beautifully Situated. Facing South. 

F.lec. Light. Every Comfort. Sep. Tables. F.x. Cuisine. Mod. 

Tariff. 'Phone 217: Tels., "Claremont." Miss FORBES, Prop'tress. 



HOTEL, 



Buxton THE EGERTON, 



ST. JOHN'S RD. 

First-class Private 
Hotel. Facing 

South. On the Level. Xear Golf Links, Baths and Pump Room. 

Redecorated and Refurnished Throughout. Beautiful Lounge. 

Drawing Room, Smoke Room. Separate Tables. Excellent 

Cuisine. Private Sitting Rooms. Central Heating. Garage. 

'Phone 205. Apply Misses ALLARD, late Corbar House. 

Cheltenham Spa PLOUGH HOTEL 

HIGH-CLASS FAMILY & COMMERCIAL HOTEL (Fully Licensed). 
Redecorated. Private and Public Lounges. Central 
Heating. Chef. Good Cuisine. Garage. R.A.C. 
'Phone 899. Tels., " Plough." ^ 

Cheltenham-MELROSE HOTEL, &^™?*g*&**i 



Dining Rooms. 
.Apolv for Must 



Elec. Light. Radiators or Gas Fires in Bedrooms, 
atcd Tariff. Inclusive Terms from £3 3 to £5 5. 



THE WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

BEST FOR THE HOME. BEST FOR THE HOLIDAY. 



Clevedoa — Clovelly — Colwyn Bay 



2t 



CLEVEDON. 

STANGLIFF 

BOARDING ESTAB. 

Nes. 1 and 2. 
p HARMING Situ- 
^ ation, in Own 
Grounds, overlooking 
Bristol Channel and 
Welsh Hills. Terms 
Mod. H.&C. Baths. 
5 mins. Pier, 15 mins. 
Train and Links. 
'Phone 4. 
Teh., "Siancliff." 
Applv Mr. & Mrs. 
P. TEFFERIES. 




Stancliff No. 2 stands in same grounds a few yards to left. 



P,iPVP(1fiTl— EaC+in*>*+nn Boarding HocgJ, Elton Road.— Close 
WCKCUU11 CciSLinglOn toSeaandher. Near Bowling Green. 

15 mins. G.W.R. and Light Railway Stations. Separate Tables. 

Cycle Accom. Terms Moderate. Apply Misses WILLIS. 



CLOVELLY, N. Devon. First-i 



Family, Enlarged and 



Redecorated. Ex. Cuisine. Mod. Tariff. 

Accommodation all the year. 

Tels., " Bushel!. -r 



tAO 



^X^}=t 



^ 



&r& 



Bideforl Station 11 a.i 



Motot 

•Bus Meets Trainj 

*t Bideford Station from Hotel. 

From Clovelly 9 20 a.m., 3 p.m. 

, 4.31 p.m. A. E. BUSHEL.L, Prop. 



COLWYN DBJ-A.'X^. 

THE IDEAL HOLIDAY RESORT FOR WINTER AND SUMMER. 

" ROTHESAY," Private & Residential Hotel, pJKU 

Esiab. 1898. Finest Position on Sea Front. Magnificent Views. 
Lounge, Smoke and W T riting Rooms. Separate Tables. Electric 
Light Throughout. 80 Bedrooms. Visitors can Bathe from House. 
Near (3) Golf Links. Coaching, Boating, Tennis, Garage. 
Tels.. " Kirkpatrick. Colwyn Bay." Telr phone 117. 

Riios-on-$ea(Golip Bay)-B E L V E D E R E 

Boarding Estab!ishment.- 0p c e n i y aMe r ; 

Well-appointed house. Close to Fier, Golf Links and Sea. Most 
convenient lor Trams to Llandudno and Colwyn B ay. Tariff on 
application. 'Phone 24Y3. Ihe Misses BURTT & WENSLEY. 



Situation Ideal 
for : 



KHOS-ON SEA, Colwyn Bay. 



Entertainments , 
Scenery, Golf 



IVSOUNT TRBLLO 



Sep. Tables. 
Modern Comforts. 



PR IV A TE 
HOTEL 



Mrs. REHAX, P 



ro;.i 



RH0S-0N-SEA, 



Inishmore pte Hotel & 



Near 
Colwyn Say. nnaiiiimio Bdg. Estab.— 
Facing Sea & Pier. Close r.olt Links. Perfect Cuisine. Sep. Tables. 

Electric l.iv-it 'Phone 161 Colwvn Bav. PROPRIETRESS 

RH0S-0N-SEA, Nr - B c a f' yn Rhos Point ^5Bft£KE 

on Sea Front. Balconv facing Sea. Mountain Views. Nr. Golf Links, 
Pier, &c. Good Cuisine". Sep. Tables. 'Phon?2rU. PROP RIETRESS. 

Mothersill's Seasick Remedy 

Stops and Prevents Travel Sickness. 25 Years of Success. 



Cromer — -Derbyshire — ^Douglas — Droitwich 



Cromer -NEWHAVEN COURT 

Lin Own Grounds of 10 acres. Electric 
Light. Tennis (Hard and Grass Courts). 
B Superb Ball Room. 18-hole Golf Course 
(7 minutes). Sea Fishing. Special Autumn and Winter Terms. 
'Phone 104 Cromer. Apply MANAGER. 

DERBYSHIRE Bradsbaw Edge, Whaley Bridge, 

^be Sycamores. 'STST 

Surrounded by the most Charming Scenery in Derbyshire. Southern 
Aspect. Sheltering under Eccles Pike over 1,000 ft. above sea level. 
Tenuis. Croquet. Golf. Billiards. Electric Light Throughout. 
Own Garage. Moderate and Inclus ive Tariff. 'Phone 46 Whaley. 

PRIVATE HOTEL, 

Metropole Mansions, 
Queen's Prom. 'Pels., "Dodsworth, Metropole Mansions, Douglas." 
Inclusive Charges 106 per dav. Mr. & Mrs. DODSWORTH. 



DOUGLAS, IOM.-DODSWORTH'S 



THE BRINE BATHS SPA. 

Renowned for Treatment of RHEUMATISM AND ALL ALLIED 
CONDITIONS. Illustrated Booklet of Treatments, Amusements, 
Charming District, Hotels, &c, free from 

BERKELEY HOLLYER, 52, Corbett Estate Offices, Droitwich. 



^F^Wi 




DROITWICH SPA) . 
The Worcestershire 
BRINE BATHS 
HOTEL. * 

OPPOSITE BRINE BATHS. 
150 Rooms Bedrooms on 
Ground Floor). Suites. Lift. 
Lounge and Dining Room En- 
larged. Elec. Light. Hard & 
Grass Courts. New iS-hole 
Golf Course. Garage. A.A., 
R.A.C. Open all the Year. 
Mod. Incl. Terms. Write for 
Descriptive Tariff. 'Phone 2. 
T. K. CULLEY, Manager. 



DROITWICH (SPA) 

Ayrshire House. 

Private Boarding 
■ Establishment 

Standing in its Own Grounds, 
with Tennis & Croquet Lawns. 
About 300 yards from St. 
Andrew's Brine Baths. Cor- 
ridors Heated in Winter. 
Electric Light & Gas Fires in 
Bedrooms. Annexe added. 
Garage. 'Phone 37. 
Miss REILLY, Prop'tress. 




Droitwich — Dulverton — Eastbourne 



23 



DROITWICH (SPA). 




ST. ANDREWS 
HOUSE. 

Leading House. 

Electric Light, constant 
Hot Water supply in Bed- 
rooms, and VI-Sprinij on 
Box Mattresses. Situated 
in Beautiful Grounds of 10 
acres. Separate Lawns for 
Croquet. Tennis, Bowls, 
and 9-hole Putiing Green. 
Own Dairy Produce and 
Poultry. Lock-up Garages. 
Moderate Terms. 
Telegrams and Telephone 
56 Droitwich. 



Diilverton- CARNARVON ARMS HOTEL. 420 feet.) 

Quite in the Country. Comfortable and Homelike. 
Five miles Reserved Trout Fishing Free to Guests. 
Stag, Fox, Otter Hunting. Hunters for Hire. Own 
Farm and Dairy Produce. Tennis. Billiards. 
R.A.C. and A. A. 'Phone 2. Wire—" NELDER." 

DULVERTON. 

LAMB HOTEL. 

UIRST-CLASS. Hunting. Free Fishing to Guests 
staying in Hotel. Hunters; Hacks; Stables; Open 

and Closed Cars. Garage and Inspection Pit. Billiards. 

Motor 'Bus meets all Trains. Listed Hotel to A. A. and 

M.U. Write for Tariff to the Proprietor, 

G. C. STANBURY. 
Wires: " Stanbury, Dulverion." Telephone 9. 



EASTBOURNE. -Devonshire Place. On the Sunny Side, adjoining 



Grand Parade. Accom. fur 150 Guests 

Sea Bathing. First-class, 

Up-to-date. 



=55^*; 



-e& 



■***L 



3^*1*^ — Hotel Wolselev 

Landaulette at Visitors' disposal for 

Station, Theatres, and 3 Golf Courses, 6d. each way. 

contra! g. Gas Fires. H. & C Water & 'P hones in all Bed rooms- 

Eastbourne— GLENDOWER 

PRIVATE HOTEL, Burlington Place. Near Devon- 
shire Park, and one minute from Sea Front. Gas 
Fires in Bedrooms. Terms, Winter 3 gns., Summer 
4 gns. Xo Extras. Mrs. M. HAMILTON MOSS. 

Eastbourne WILMINGTON 

PRIVATE HOTEL. West End of Eastbourne. 
Near Devonshire Park. Ideal Winter Position. 
First-class Cuisine. Separate Tables. Central 
Heating. 'Phone 1219. The Misses GIDDINGS. 
MENTION THIS GDTDE. 



24 Eastbourne — Edinburgh — Exmouth — Falmouth 



Eastbourne GOURTLANDS, 

Wilmington Gardens. A Select Private Hotel. Modernly Equipped. 
Comfortably Furnished. Open Position close to Sea and opposite 
Devonshire Park. Reputation built on Expert and Attractive 
Cuisine. Inclusive Terms. No Extras. Apply PROPRIETORS. 



EDINBURGH 



Centrally situated in Princes St. 
opposite Princes Gardens. 




FIRST-CLASS FAMILY and 
RESIDENTIAL HOTEL. 
Tel. No. 

9304 w lines). 



Telegrams, 
WELCOME, 

EDINBURGH." 

Three Minutes from East 
and West Coast Railways. 

G. TESTUZ, Manager. 

Exmouth— IMPERIAL HOTEL 

Stands in Pte. Grounds, facing Sea. Officially ApDtd. Hotel to R.A.C. 
& A. A. Ex. Winter Resort. Enlarged & Refurnished. Elec. Light & 
Lift. Central Heating. Single Rooms & Suites. High-class Cuisine. 
Three Golf Links near. Hunting. Moderate Inclusive Terms. 
Special Winter Tariff. Tels., " Imperial, Exmouth." 'Phone 16. 

falmouth. BOSCAWEN HOTEL 

PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL. 



CENTRE of Sea Front. 
Facing South. Ideal 
Situation. Glorious, Summer 
and Winter. Modern and 
Well -organised Hotel. Elec. 
Light Throughout. 
'Phone 141. 
Wires, " Boscawen Hotel." 
Illustrated Handbook gratis 
from the PROPRIETORS. 




SOUTH FRONT. 



FALMOUTH. 

Ideal Summer and Winter Resort. 

HOLMLEA PRIVATE HOTEL 

ON Sea Front, facing Bathing Beach. Standing in 
Own Grounds, in Sunniest Corner of Bay, facing 
South. Excellent Cuisine. Separate Tables. Elec. Light 
Throughout. Tennis Court. Garage. Terms Moderate. 

Apply PROPRIETRESS. 



Falmouth — Felixstowe 25 

Falmouth GWENDRA PENSION 

FJ.-.i (||- Beautifully Situated on the 
r I I S L U I 3. S S . Promenade. Facing the Sea. 
" " **" mmmmm^m^mm Qose t0 concert Gardens & 
Bathing Beaches. Separate Tables. Personal Supervision. 
^ Miss M. BAR RY, Proprietress. 

Falmouth, Cornwall PENTARCAN gg^ 

Stands in Own Grounds. South Aspect. On Sea Front. Directly 
facing the Bay. Smoking Rooms. Lounge. Billiards. 
Full-size Table (Thurston). Croquet. Table d'Hote. Separate 
Tables. Electric Light Throughout. Golf, rS-hole Course, 1 mile. 

Apply Mr. & Mrs. J. BANBURY, Proprietors. 
Telephone 101 Falmouth. Also " EEDISTON." Bade. 

Felixstowe-CRAND HOTEL. £«£ 

class English Cuisine. "A Most Comfortable Hotel." 
'Phone 84. Telegrams, "Grand, Felixstowe." 

RESIDENT PROPRIETOR. 



Felixstowe— MELROSE PRIVATE 
HOTEL. 



FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL. Finest 
Position. Facing Sea. Dancing and Bridge. 
'Phone 103. Write for Illustrated Tariff. 
Mrs. J. C. BUTLER, Proprietress. 



Felixstowe SOUTH BEACH MANSION 

PRIVATE HOTEL. En Pension and Residential. Situated in 
Extensive Flower Garden and Rockery. Facing Sea. Close 
to Golf Links, Tennis Courts and Croquet. Unsurpassed for 
Convalescents in Autumn and Winter. 'Phone 155. 

Tariff on Application. E. BOWEN, Resident Proprietress. 

Felixstowe-TttE ORWELL HOTEL 

Tbe Garden Eotel of Felixstowe. (Centrally Situated for 
Station, Sea Front and Golf Course). Fully Licensed. Excellent 
Cooking. Inclusive Tariff. Tennis. Billiards. Stabling. Garage. 
'Phone 70. For Tariff, please apply to the MAXAGER. 

Felixstowe - MARLBOROUGH 
& CHATSWORTH SBSHLPSK 

Pier and Bandstand, and near Amusements. Dancing and 
Picnics. Own Farm Produce. Excellent Cuisine. Garage. 
Chatsworth— 'Phone 130. Marlborough — 'Phone 126. 

M r. ,'c Mr-. DAWhOX. I'ror.rietnrs. 

Felixstowe-UPPER MAYES ^SSs'tSlS 

Tables. Own Garden Produce. Garage. Station : Felixstowe Beach. 
Telephone 268. Mrs. H. WAIXWR1GHT, Proprietress. 

THE WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

AT ALL BOOKSTALLS, BOOKSHOPS AND NEWSAGENTS 



26 Folkestone — Fowey — Freshwater Bay — Gorleston 



FOLKESTONE. West Lea?. Liberatiy Adn 

Well Maintained & Very Comfortable. ■ . 7 

Average Terms : 
Daily Oct.-Apl. 12/6. Sumr. 14/6. 
Pension, Weekly, Oct.-Apl. 3J gns. 
Season 44 ens. F. L. DELL. Proorietor. 



GOOD 



listered. 





FOWEY. 

THE ESPLANADE So't v e a u te 

IS Well Situated. Good View of Harbour. 
' Pleasant Garden. Summer House. 
Private Landing. Convenient for Fishing, 
Boating and Bathing. Close to Church 
and Post, Shops and Garage. Golf. Tennis. 
Sailing and Rowing Boats attached to 
Hotel. Motor Char-a-banc Running to.'.all 
parts of Devon and Cornwall. Lunches 
put up for those spending the day out. 
Capt. C. H. B. TRUSCOTT, 

Proprietor. 



FOWEY, CORNWALL-PEN LEE PRIVATE 

U ATCI Beautifully Situated, facing the Sea. 
V ' Ideal Position. Replete with Every 

Comfort. Separate Tables. Moderate Terms. 

Mrs. E. F. JORDAN, Proprietress. 
FRESHWATER BAY, I. of W. 

FRESHWATER BAY HOTEL 



SHELTER. 



SECLUSION. 



SUNSHINE. 

Unrivalled Situation and Views. Six Acres Grounds. Lawn to Cliffs. Cuisine and 
Cellar, First-class. Own Garden Produce. Electric Light Throughout. 

PRIVATE SUITES, WITH BATHROOM. 

CLIMATE RENOWNED FOR RECUPERATIVE POWERS. 

Golf (opposite), Two 18-hole courses. 

Through Booking 1 ;, including Coach— Waterloo, via Lymington, 3} hours. 'Phone 47. 

Apply MANAGERESS. 

Also ALBION HOTEL (summer only) ON SEA FRONT. 

Cioucester-Bei! Hotel? 1 ^^!^^^ 



appointed by R.A.C., A.A. & M.U. 
Light. Garage. 'Phone 772. Tels., 



Night Porter. Electric 
'Bell Hotel, Gloucester." 



GORLEST ON-ON-SEA.— Facing Sea & Harbour. 



BoardResidence a Speciality. 



Every 



Light. Baths 



^ 



tuT. 



\o& 



^ o"*" 



Ei- 



First-class. 
BILLIARD SALOON. 
Luncheons, Dinners & Teas for Non-residents. 
'Phone 118. Prsnl. Supervision. Mrs. B. FOWLER, Prop'tress. 



Grasmere 



(See page 28) 



Harrogate 



Harrogate 



IS a most delightful HOLIDAY resort 
in addition to being a "Spa of the 
first magnitude " as it has been 
aptly described by a leading Spa expert. 

The Air is glorious, the Countryside 
teems with beauty spots, the Town is 
cheerfulness and brightness personified, 
and the Sports, Amusements, and 
Entertainments are excellent in quality 
and variety. 



For a CURE for Rheumatism and 
its allied troubles of Sciatica, Lum- 
bago, Neuritis, &c, for Liver, Heart, 
Stomach and Skin troubles, you can- 
not possibly do better than Harrogate- 



The Spa of 87 Waters. 



Free details from F. J. C. Broome 
" W.L." Dept. . . . Harrogate 



28 Grasmere — Harrogate — Heme Bay — Hunstanton 

Grasmere (English Lakes)-BALDRY'S MOSS GR0YE" 

FIRST-CLASS PRIVATE HOTEL. Old-established. Highly 
Recommended. Excellent Catering. Splendid Centre for Climbing, 
Boating and Fishing. Motors to all parts. Motors for Hire. 
Chars-a-bancs from Hotel meet Steamers at Waterhead Pier. 
GARAGE. Tels., " Moss Grove, Grasmere." 'Phone 51. 
Personal Supervision. Mr. & Mrs. E. H. BALDRY, Proprietors 

HARROGATE— A DELPHI HOTEL. 

One of the Oldest and Most Comfortable Residential Hotels in 
Harrogate. Near Valley Gardens, Royal Baths and Royal Hall. 
Handsome Lounge and Dining Room. Lift al 1 Floors. Beautiful 
Garden and Tennis Lawn. Excellent Cuisine. Hotel 'Bus meets 
all Trains. Mrs. HODGSON, Manageress. 

'Phones 255 & 256. {Late o/Gra»by Hotel, Harrogate,) 

Harrogate-KIRKSYDE ■SKSZ.' 

Central. Three minutes from Baths — on same level. Accommo- 
dation for Eighty Guests. Most Comfortable and Inexpensive. 
„ Telegrams & 'Phone, 272 Harrogate. 

Miss PULLAN. 

Harrogate— W ELLINGTON 

U AT C I FIRST-CLASS FAMILY. Telephone 257. 
"w ■ CLii Mrs. M. STOKES. 

HERNE BAY "KROONSTAD" 

BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT, Canterbury Road. 
Old-established. Cuisine a Special Feature. Separate 
Tables. Pleasant Garden, overlooking Sea and 
Downs. 'Phone 220. Apply PROPRIETRESS. 

Hunstanton IE STRANGE ARMS 

and GOLF LINKS HOTEL.— Phone 10. Garage. 
GLEBE HOTEL.— Phone 35. 
GOLDEN LION HOTEL.— Phone 18. „ 
C. ERNEST GRAY, Proprietor 

How to Make Good Pictures- 



A new and practical work by 

PERCY R. SALMON, F.R.P.S. 

With the aim of helping beginners, and also of giving 
useful information to those already familiar with the 
principles of photography, the writer has endeavoured to 
produce a thoroughly up-to-date, reliable, and easily 
understood guide to the practice of photography, which 
will help the photographer at every stage and in every 
branch of his work. 

Nearly ioo Illustrations. 2/6 net. From all Booksellers. 
WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., Salisbury Square, London, E.C.4. 



Hastings and St. Leonards 29 

SUNSHINE &- PLEASURE <* 
ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



jj 



2 kM - -4£=»-«?~ 




C 

a: 



Write Box WX., Town Hall, Hastings, for Particulars of our Twelve 
Months' Season. 



HASTINGS. 



QUEEN'S HOTEL, 

LEADING & BEST. NO TRAMS OR TRAFFIC. 

MAGNIFICENT BALL ROOM & SILVER GRILL. 

HEADQUARTERS LOCAL ROTARY CLUB. 

'Phone HASTINGS 201. 



HASTINGS. 



ALBANY HOTEL 

FIRST-CLASS HOTEL, 



EXCEL.J_.ENT CUISINE. 
Finest Position on Sea Front. 
Away from Trams and Traffic. 



3° 



Ilfracombe 



Heme Bay 
Hunstanton 



(See page .28) 



(See page 28). 



ILFRACOMBE, 




"PHIS Well-known, High-class PRIVATE 
■*■ HOTEL, facing Sea, contains 100 
Apartments. Lounge. Billiard and Ball 
Rooms. Electric Light and Lift Separate 
Tables. Frequent Dances and Entertain- 
ments. Golf Links 1 \ miles. Garage. 

Moderate Inclusive Tariff from 
Phone Ilfracombe 22. L. PARSONS. 



ILFRACOMBE. 

MOONTA 

Capstone Parade. 
SITUATED immediately 
on Sea-edge, and com- 
manding a Magnificent 
View of Land & Sea from 
Windows & Balconies. 
Close to Pier, Putting & 
Bowling Greens & New 
Pavilion. Electric Light. 
Mod. & Inclusive Terms. 
Garage Near. 
Apply Proprietresses, 

The Misses 
GORDON & DUNSTER. 



PRIVATE HOTEL. 




ILFRACOMBE. 

MOTEL CECIL 

BEST Position on Sea Front, being on the Level, Adjacent to and Facing 
the Sea and Capstone Promenade, New Municipal Concert Hall, 
Putting and Bowling Greens, and within one minute's walk of the Bathing 
Beaches, Torrs Walks, Public Tennis Courts (hard and grass), and all 
Amusements. Spacious Drawing, Dining, and Smoke Rooms with Large 
and Comfortablv Furnished Lounge, all Facing Sea. 50 Well-appointed 
Bedrooms, equipped with Hot end Cold Water. Electric Light Throughout. 
Hot and Cold Baths. Sanitary Arrangements Perfect. Large Private 
Garage. Petrol, Oils and Full Range of Tyres Slocked. 

Under the Personal Supervision of the Proprietor, F. A. KNTLL. 
Phone 121. Tels., "Hotel Cecil, Ilfracombe." 

Ilfracombe 'Qrosvenor' gs» 

Private Hotel. First-class F.n Pension. One minute Sea & Parade. 
Fifty Bedrooms. Spacious Public Rooms. Lounge. Table d'Hdte. 
Separate Tables. Replete with every Comfort. Moderate. 
Listed Hotel K.A.C. and M.U. Garage. Tel. 63. 

Miss W. L. PICKETT, Proprietress. 



Ilfracombe 



3i 



Ilfracombe Private Good -class Boarding House. 

"Sea field ' ' a front. 

ILLUSTRATED TARIFF. TERMS STRICTLY MODERATE. 

'Phone 189. Private Touring Car for Hire. Mr. & Mrs. C BEAN. 
Tels.. " Seafield. Ilfracombe." 

Ilfracombe - ST. PETROC 

BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT. Situated on Level. Adjoining 
famous Torrs Walks and Tunnels, Bathing Beaches. Smoke Room. 
40 Bedrooms. Good Cooking and Attendance. Unique Position 
for Winter Residence. Telephone 119. W. L. CHADDER. 

TOURING CAR FOR HIRE. OWN GARAGE. 



ILFRACOMBE 




THE 



Garage. Ex. Cuisine. 
Motor Tours arranged by Own Cars. 
: 76. Illustrated Tariff. D. DADDS. 



Ilfracotnbe-ARCADE HOUSE 

BOARDING ESTAB., Arcade Rd. Immediately Adjoining Sea Front 
and Parade, facing Wildersmouth Beach. Balcony opening out from 
Dining Room overlooking Sea. Elec. Light Throughout. Good Cook- 
ing & Attendance. Lib. Table. Mod. Terms. Most Central for Motor 
Tours. Tels., "Arcade House." Tariff. Mrs. W. L. CHURCH. 

BOARDING 
ESTAB., 

Hillsborough Terrace. Splendid Position. Large Balcony, with 
Magnificent Land and Sea Views. Overlooking Pier and Park. 
Close to Bathing Beaches, Lawn Tennis Courts. Electric Light. 
Late Dinners. Garage. Tariff on Application. Inclusive. 
Proprietress, Mrs. STANBURY. 



Isle of Man 

(See pages 


22 anc 


I 46) 




Isle of Wight 

(See pages 


26, 48, 


49, 50 


and 59! 


A NEW BOOK 


FOR 


MOTORISTS. 



OWNER-DRIVER'S HANDBOOK 

How to drive and look after your car. 
By EDWARD T. BROWN. 

Motoring Correspondent to the " Westminster Gazette," and many of 

the leading Provincial and Colonial Papers. 

Cloth. Over 100 Illustrations. From all Booksellers 



3/< 



3XTe>-fc. 



WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON. E.C.I 



32 



Keswick 



u s xeio 



1 — (English Lakes). 



ROYAL OAK HOTEL 

Is one of the most Up-to-date and Best-equipped Hotels in the District. 
ESTABLISHED over 200 years. Situated in the most commanding 
*-* position in the town, and within a few minutes' walk of Derwentwater 
Lake, Golf Links, and Fitz Park. The Hotel has been honoured with 
the patronage of the late King Edward VII (when Prince of Wales), and 
other Royal Personages. Special Winter Tariff. 

Well-appointed Four-in-hand-Coaches and Motor Chars-a-bancs leave Hotel 
daily to all parts of the Lake District. Garage for 100 Cars on the 
Premises. Officially appointed Hotel for A.A. and M.U. 

Proprietors— THE LAKE DISTRICT HOTELS, Ltd. 
•Phone 23. Teh., " Royal Hotel, Keswick." H. E. REVELL, Manager. 

Keswick-Queen'sHotel-S^^^^SK 

rounding Mountains. Close to Lake, Golf Links, Fitz Park, &c. Re- 
commended M.U. and A.A. Headquarters. C.T.C The well-known 
Lake District Coaches, Ltd. & Motor Chars-a-bancs leave Hotel daily 
for all parts. Special Winter Tariff. GARAGE for 100 Cars. 
Tels., "Caterer, Keswick." 'Phone 54. Applv MANAGFRESS. 
Proprietors— THF. LAKE DISTRICT HOI ELS, LTD. 

KESWICK. 



■1 110 Centre ot Lakeland. 
Derwentwater.Bassenthwaite, 
Loweswater, Wast water, Thirl- 
mere, Grasmere, Rydal, Win- 
dermere, Ullswater & Coniston 
Lakes, &c, all easy of access. 
— Make the KESWICK 
HOTEL your Headquarters 
and Visit the above Lakes 
by Coach or Motor. Inclusive 
Rates. Free Golf Course. Per- 
fect Sanitation. Illus. Tariff 
on application. Hotel — Mr. * 
Mrs. WIVELL, Resident Proprie- 
tors. Coaches and Motors - 
WTVELL S COACHES & MOTORS. 
LTD. 'Phone 20. 




KESWICK HOTEL. 



KESWICK (English Lakes). First-class. Old Established 
Central bituation. Close Lake, Park, Golf L 
Electric Lieht. Sep. 



Tables. 



uTS 



h«* 



rf»*' 



f. 
' Phone 77. F 



Motor & Coach 
ins to all parts. Motors 
: Hire. Garage. Petrol. Personal Supervision. 
■ Tariff apply E. W. ROBERTS. Proprietor. 



KESWICK English Lakes)-SEYM0UR HOUSE 

BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT, Lake Road. Beautiful Situation. 
Magnificent Views of Mountains. Near the Lake. CeDtral for 
all Tours in the District. Electric Light Throughout. Every 
Comfort. For Terms, apply 

Miss A. WAGGETT, Proprietress. 

KESWICK, Portinscale THE HOWE 

PRIVATE HOTEL. Standing in its Own Grounds. Commanding 
Magnificent and Uninterrupted Views of Mountains and Lakes. 
Splendid Centre for Motoring, Climbing, Boating and Fishing. 
Separate Tables. Garage. Moderate Tariff. Personal Super- 
vision. For Terms, apply Mrs. J. HARTLEY, Fropriebress. 
Telegrams, "The Howe, Keswick." 



Keswick — Launceston — Llandrindod Wells 33 

Keswick-BRUNDHOLM HOTEL {U SffiSSS- S itSn^S 

Lake and Beautiful Borrowdale Valley. Good Cuisine. Motor 
Tours. 'Phone 132. Miss MILLER. 

LAUNCESTON, N. Cornwall- WHITE HART 

HOTEL FIRST-CLASS FAMILY. ^Centrally Situated for 
"" ' «« Tourists, &c, wishing to visit all parts of Devon 
and Cornwall. R.A.C., A.A. and M U. Over 20 miles of Trout 
and Salmon Fishing reserved for Hotel Guests. Excellent 
Cuisine and Wines of the Finest Quality. Hotel 'Bus meets 1 rains. 
'Phone 13. E. F. MILLER & SOX, Resident Proprietors. 

Leamington Spa-LACHINE l^ggggSSr^cSS. 

S. Aspect. Elec. Light. Gas Fires in Bedrooms. Central Heating. 
Garage. Personal Management. Apply PROPRIETRESS. 

LITTLEHAMPTON-BEACH HOTEL. 

STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS. STANDING IN OWN LOVELY 

GROUNDS. FACING SEA. 'Phone 55. G.S.STACEY. 

Littlehampton - " SOUTHLANDS " F j a t 

Private Hotel. On Sea Front, facing South. 'Phone 42. 
Apply Miss WOOD, Manageress. 

LLANDRINDOD WELLS. 



BRYNAWEL HOTEL 

HIGH-CLASS. FINEST POSITION. 
Accommodation for 150 Guests. Electric Lift. 

Golfing and Fishing Centre. Tennis. Croquet. 
Billiards. 

Tel. 27. JEFFREY JONES, Managing Director. 

LLANDRINDOD WELLS THE GWALIA 

UATCI Health and Pleasure Resort The Largest 

' '^^ ' &»»■ Unlicensed Hotel in Llandrindod. Lounges, 
Ladies' Drawing Room. Smoke Room, Billiard Room (two tables), 
Recreation Room for Dances, Concerts. See. Near Station Post, 
Office, Golf, Tennis, Bowls, & Mineral Springs. Central Heating. 
Two Electric Lifts. Five miles Trout Fishing. Open Throughout 
the Year. A.A. and R.A.C. 'Phone 40. 

Llandrindod Wells-THE BERKELEY F ^ in ^ r n c m 

Baths & Pump Room. Near Golf Links. Spacious Lounge. Billiards. 
Separate Tables. Inclusive Terms from 3 guineas. 'Phone 110. 
Proprietress, Mrs. M. MILLWARD. 

THE IDEAL HOLIDAY MAGAZINE 

THE WINDSOR 

Series, 1926-27] 3 



34 



Llandudno 



LLANDUDNO 

Bedrooms with Running Water. 

Private Suites 
Two Lifts. 



Centrally Situated. 
Facing Sea. 




Garage (40 Cars). 



HOTEL 



140 Rooms. 
'Phone 391 (3 lines). 
Terms and Full Particulars— 

S. CHANTREY, Managing Director. 



LLANDUDNO . 
THE 

CLARENCE HOTEL 

(FULLY LICENSED). 

FIRST-CLASS. Central Posi- 
tion. Close to Pier, Pavilion 
and Golf Links. Excellent Cuisine. 
Electric Light. Heated in Winter. 
Lounge. Billiard and Smoking 
Rooms. Tels., "Clarence Hotel, 
Llandudno." 'Phone 566. Special 
Winter Terms. For Tariff, apply 
MANAGERESS. 




LLAirDUDNO. Facing South— Finest Sea & Mountain Vie 
Verandah. Heated Through- 
Special 

: Pier, 

Prom, and Two Golf Links 

(Sunday Play). Garage. Fully Licensed. 

: 259. App:y Mrs. J. HALL, Proprietress. 



out. Open all Year 
Winter Terms. 



-&&*£- 



*&£- 



&<* 



Llandudno . FOUR OAKS Boarding Estab. 

Open all the year. (Temp.). 
Central Promenade, opposite cor- 
ner to Hydro. Back entirely open 
to Mountains. Easy distance Golf, 
Pier, Garage, Tennis and Theatres. 
Sep. Tables. Excellent Cuisine. 
Moderate Winter Terms. Xmas 
Festivities. Personal Supervision. 
Good Fires in Winter and Summer, 
ii necessary. WIRELESS. 

Telephone 308. 
<* M*-lTfc fcl»* For Terms, apply 

Mrs. SIMPSON YATES. 
Proprietress. 

PRIVATE HOTEL, 
Gloddeath Avenue. 

South-West Aspect. Open all the Year. Close to Promenade, 
Pier and Pavilion. Near Three Golf Links, Recreation Ground and 
Tennis. Sea and Mountain Views from all Windows. Liberal Table, 
Every Comfort. Reasonable Terms. Special Winter Terms. 
For Tariff apply Miss RICHARDS 

'Phone 183. (late West End Hotel). 




LLANDUDNO — MARSHLANDS 



Llandudno — Llanfairfechan — Llangammarch Wells 35 



LLANDUDNO. 

ThcDRUMMOND 

HIGH-CLASS BOARDING 
ESTABLISHMENT. 

CENTRAL. One minut • from 
Sea, Promenade, and few 
minutes from Pier and Pavilion. 
Electric Light Throughout. Sep- 
arate Tables. Moderate Winter 
Terms. 'Phone 417. 

For Tariff, applv 

Mrs. SPRIXGTHORPE, 
Proprietress. 




LLANDUDNO. Facing the Sea. 



Recreation Room. Billiards. 
Electric Lift. Tel. Add. : 
" Middwood." 



:o§^ 



^e 



£r> an 



n ceV 

X6^ S Tennis Courts. 

Accommodation for 200 Visitors. 
Misses MIDDLETON 8c WOOD. 



Llandudno- Ormescliffe olLt^^ 

raodation for 300. Orchestra. Dances each Evening. Wireless. 
Billiards. 'Phone 178. Mr. 6; Mrs. ALLEN SMITH. 

Llandudno SHERWOOD Bdg. 

Promenade, facing Sea. Splendid 
View of Bay and Ormes. Electric 

Light. Picnics, Motor and Coach Parties arranged. 

Open all the Year. Terms Moderate. Mrs. E. L. PARRY. 



House. 



LLANDUDNO -" THE CRESCENT 



»j 



PRIVATE HOTEL. "Oneof the Best.' 
Promenade Facing Sea. Bright Open Position with 
Charming Views from all Rooms. Tennis Free on 
Own Lawn. 'Phone 274. W, L. MORAN. 

Llanfairfechan BALMORALS* 

Established 32 years. Situated on Promenade. Highly Recom- 
mended. Separate Tables. Excellent Cuisine. Every Comfort, 
Near Station ani Tennis Courts. Wireless Concerts. Motors for Hire. 
Moderate Tariff. Porter meets all Trains. 'Phone 32. 

Under Personal Supervision of Proprietress, Miss J. E. .TONES. 

Llangaramarch Wells LAKE HOTEL. 

Situated in Private Estate of 400 Acres with 
River and Lake Fishing. iS-hole Golf Links. 
Grass and Hard Tennis Courts. Celebrated Barrum 
Spring for Heart. &c. Apply MANAGER. 



36 



Loch Lomond — London — Looe — Lowestoft 



LOCH LOMOND. 




8 Tarbet. 



TARBET HOTEL. 



/~ HARMING Situation 
V_^ on the " Bonnie, 
bonnie" banks of Loch 
Lomond. The very place 
for a Restful Hol.day. 
Every Attention to Visi- 
tors. Beautiful Drives. 
Moderate Charges. Cars 
on Hire. Golf. Tennis. 
Fishing. Garage with 

Lock-ups for 20 Cars. 
Apply MANAGERESS, 
Tarbet Hotel, 

Dumbartonshire. 



■ 



Imperial Hotels ll 



ssell 
Square 



9 Hotels. 3,500 Rooms. 
Hot and Cold Water. Bat'j 



London | 



Central Position. Room Fitted *T/Cfc 
Breakfast and Service from ■ / ** 



LONDON centrai-HOTEL GWALEA 

UPPER W.OBURN PLACE, W.C.I. Comfort & Refinement. Beauti- 
ful Restaurant. H. &C. running water in every room. 'Buses pass 
door to all parts of London. Bed, Bath & Breakfast fr. 8/6, according 
to room. 'Phones on all Floors. Cent. Heating. Nr. Euston, St. Pan- 
eras & King's Cross SJations. Central for West End, City &Theatre- 
land 'Phones Museum 5104 lV 5105. Tels., " Gwaliotel. London." 



London 



(See also page ii in front of this Guide 



Stb. Cornwall- BOSCARN 



HOTEL. 



Nearest Hotel to the Sea. Wonderful 
Position. Facing South. Caiefil 
Catering and Cooking. Electric 
Light Throughout. Garage. 'Phone 23 Looe. 

For Tariff, apply RESIDENT PROPRIETOR. 



LOWESTOFT. 

Facing Pier & Yacht Basin. Passenger Lift. 
'Phone? : Lowestoft 

C94— Hotel Office. 

395— Visitors' Calls. 
GARAGE. 




Two Tennis 

Courts and Croquet 

Lawn within Hotel Grounds. 

Terms and Full Particulars, 

J. B. WHALEY, Resident Proprietor. 



Lowestoft-Esplanade Hotel-^^r'^ta 

Front. Tel. 298. Apply Proprietors, Mr. & Mrs. JENNER. 



Lyme Regis — Lymington — Lynmouth 



37 



LYME REGIS 



for Health 
& Sunshine, 



BELL CLIFF 



BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT. Directly on Sea 
Front. Modern Sanitation. Electric Light. 
Excellent Table. Moderate Terms. 
Mr. \- Mrs. H. G. E. POCOCK, Proprietors. 

Lymington THE ANGEL HOTEL. 

LEADING FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL. Officially Appointed 
A. A. 'Pii.nK- 50. \V. J. FELTHAM, Proprietor. 

LYNMOUTH. 

TORS MOTEL. 




BEAUTIFULLY Situated in its Own Grounds, 300 feet up, and facing the 
Sea. Music and Dance Room. Billiard Room. Garage. Public 
Tennis Courts (Hard and Grass). \V. & K. RIDDELL, Proprietors. 
Tels.. "Tors, Lynmouth." 'Phone 47 Lynton Exchange. 



LYNMOUTH, N. Devon. 




The BATH HOTEL 

^EAREST Hotel to 
and Facing Sea 
and Harbour. Excellent 
Cuisine. Own Personal 
Supervision. Moderate 
Tariff. Garage. 

Appointed A. A. 
'Phone 38 Lynton. 
Telegrams, "Lord, Lynmouth." 
Tariff, apply J. W. LORD. 



COMMENCE THE JOURNEY WITH 

THE WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

AT ALL BOOKSTALLS AND BOOKSHOPS. 



38 



Lyamouth — Lynton 



LYNMOUTH, NORTH DEVON. 



n\rx» 



JLmJEZ 



OTI3I* 



The Oldest Established First-class Family Hotel. 
Best Position in Lynmouth. Two minutes from and Overlooking Sea. 




Nearest Hotel to Watersmeet, Doone Valley, and most Central for Devon 

and Somerset Staghounds. G.W.Rly. Motor Coaches call at Hotel. 

Extensive Garage with all facilities adjoining Hotel. Petrol. 

Private Lock-ups. 

Officially appointed to R.A.C. &A.A. Salmon, Trout and Deep Sea Fishing. 

Golf, Bathing and Tennis. A. \V. GAYDOX, Proprietress. 



LYNMOUTH, N. Devon. 

GRANVILLE 

Central for Watersmeet, 

Doone Valley, and 

All Places of Interest. 

Close to Sea and Cliff Railway 

connecting Lynton. 
Minehead Coach Passes Door. 

O-.vn Garage on Esplanade. 

Repairs and all Accessories. 

Touring Car for Hire, and to 

all Places of interest 
Mrs. T. W. SLANN, 
'Phone 33. Proprietress. 
Tels., " Slann. Lynmouth ' 



HOUSE 'EKEiJf 




LYNTON. 




WOODY BAY HOTEL 



'Between Lvnton and 

Comb? Martin). 
Standing 700 ft. above 
Sea in Private Fstate of 
roo acres with Magnifi- 
cent Views of Sea, Woods 
and Moors. First-class 
Cooking and Cellar. No 
'Bars. Stabling. Garage. 
Bathing from Private 
Beach. Cars for Hire. 

Telegrams, 
"Holman, Woody-Bay." 
for Terms, applv 
MANAGER. 



Lynton 



39 



LYNTON N. Devon). 

ROYAL CASTLE HOTEL. 

In the LORNA DOONE Country. 




Elec. Light Throughout. Tabled'Hdte. Reading and Drawing Rooms. Newly 
constructed Lounge.with Loveliest Views in England. Putting Course. Tennis, 
En Tout Cas and Grass Courts. Motor Coaches Daily to Minehead and for 
Excursions. Stag & Fox Hunting. Fishing. Motor Garage. Moderate Tariff. 
'Phone 48. Telegrams, " Castle. Lynton " TOM JOXES, Proprietor. 



LYNTON, N. Devon. 

Magnificent Position. 600 feet above Sea. 
Charming Views of Sea and Headlands. 
Heated Throughout. 
Fully Licensed. 



E 



^ 



Garage. 



Electric Light. 
Well-appointed Hotel for 
Comfort, Excellent Cuisine 
and Moderate Tariff. 
Tfls., "Imperial, Lynton." 



'Phone 50. 



Apply Tariff, PROPRIETOR. 



LYNTON, N. Devon . 

NORTH CLIFF 

Private Hotel. 

L7IRST-CLASS. Situated in 
the Famous North Walk. 
Rebuilt and Redecorated. 
Sanitation Perfect. Stands 

in Own Grounds, 500 feet 
above and facing Sea. 

Electric Light Throughout. 
\V. F. SLOUGH, 
'Phone 57. Proprietor. 

Tels., "Northcliff, Lynton." 




4° 



Lynton — Malvern 



LYNTON, N. Devon. 

FAI RHOLM 

HIGH-CLASS Boarding Establishment. Beautifully 
Situated in Own Grounds, on the sunny side of a 
hill, about 400 feet above, and facing Sea ; commanding 
Finest Views of Sea and Coast, River Lyn, and far-famed 
Watersmeet Valley. Golf. Tennis and Bowling Green. 
Trout and Deep Sea Fishing. Private Cars and Garage. 
Terms on application to 

The Misses COURTEEN & MADDOCKS. 
'Phone 63 Lynton. Tels., "Fairholm." 

Oldest Established 
Boarding House in 

Lynton. Central for all Places of Interest. Motor and Steamer 

Excursions. Every Comfort. Separate Tables. H. & C. Baths. 

Electric Light Terms from £2 10 per week. 

Tels., "Waterloo, Lynton." Mrs. J. TUCKER. Proprietress. 

TEMPERANCE 
HOTEL. 

Central. Close to Station, Tennis Courts and Bowling Green. 
Ten minutes from Sea and Bathing. Electric Light and Heating. 
BathsfH. &C). Own Poultry Farm and Garden Produce. Moderate 
Terms. 'Phone 59 Lynton. Tels, " Attree Lvnton." 
Apply Mrs. F. ATTREE, Proprietress. 

MALVERN. 

ALDWYN TOWER 

Boarding Establishment. 

FINEST POSITION IN MALVERN. 

BEAUTIFULLY Situated. 600 ft. above 
Sea Level. Convenient for Town and 
Hills. Balcony commanding Magnificeui 
Views. Hishlv Recommended. Electric 
Light. Garage Near. 

Mrs. FRED. J. SMITH, 

• Phone 304 Malvern. PROPRIETRESS. 



Lynton.If.Devon-WATERLOO HOUSE. 



Lynton-ATTREE'S 




MALVERN. 




GOLDHILL 

PRIVATE HOTEL. 

Situated in Own Grounds. 
Nearest Hotel to Station, 
Manor Park, Malvern College 
for Girls. S. Aspect. Elec. 
Lii*ht. Heated Throughout. 
Ten minutes Hills, Public 
Gardens, Churches and Golf 
Links. Handsome Lounge. 
Ex. Winter Home. Write 
for Descriptive Tariff with 
Local Views. Garage Near. 
Apply— 'Pbone 91. 

Mrs. BRAY HARTLAND 



Malvern — Margate — Matlock 41 

MALVERN— PORTLAND HOTEL^ 

SOUTH ASPECT. Opposite Entrance to Priory Gardens. Delight- 
fully Situated in Own Grounds in the Centre of Great Malvern. 
Enjoys Highest Reputation for Cuisine, Comfort & General Arrange- 
ments. Heated Throughout. Elec. Light. Sep. Tables. Moderate 
Daily, Week-end or Weekly Terms. Reduced Winter Terms. 
Garage, lllustd. Tariff. 'Phone 151. D. WOODMAN, Proprietor. 

MALVERN -CENTRAL HOTEL 

(UNLICENSED). Most Convenient for Visitors and 
Tourists. Replete with every Comfort. Moderate 
Tariff. Also Restaurant in connection. Hot & Cold 

Luncheons Dailv. Teas, Ac. H. G. BERRY, Proo. 

Malvern HARDWICKE HOTEL. 

'Phone 246. The Hotel nearest the College and 
Golf Links. 

Mr. & Mrs. H. WILSON, Proprietors. 

Malvern Grosvenor *?&•„ ^Sd, Cent lS;h s K: 

Heated in Winter. Magnificent \ iews of the Hills and Severn Valley. 
'Phone 1S5. Mrs. WALWYX YATES, Proprietress.' 



MARGATE (Ciiftonviiie) THEDDEN 
GRANGE 



PRIVATE HOTEL, Norfolk Road. One 
minute Sea, Oval and Bathing. First- 
class Throughout. Modern and Moderate. 
Large Public Rooms. Dancing. Terms from 3 guineas- per week. 
'Phone 479. RESIDENT PROPRIETORS. 

MARGATE, CLIFTONYILLE-Northdown Parade 

Spacious Lounge"" and 
Dining Hall. 'Phone 402. E. T. FASHAM. Ltd. 

MATLOCK. THE 

LILYBANK HYDRO, 

LTD. 

Bracing. Health & Pleasure 
Resort the year round . Beau ti- 
ful Ballroom, Spring Floor. 
Extensive Grounds. Ex. Cui- 
sine. Elec. Light Throughout. 
Central Heating. All Hydro 
Piths Free toV;sitors. Garage, 
20 Cars. Tennis. En Tout Cas. 
Bowls. Croquet. Billiards. 
Terms Moderate. 'Phone 81. 

Mr. &. Mrs. JOHN" KAY, 

Managers. 



WINDSOR 1H MAGAZINE 

FOR THE BEST 
STORIES, ARTICLES AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 




4 2 Matlock — Minehead — Monmouth — Mundesley-on-Sea 




Haadquartercof HEALTH and HOLIDAYS 

Established 1853. The Leading Hydro. 

Situate in Unique Position in the Gloriou; 
Peak of Derbyshire. 260 Bedrooms. Without 
Superior for Comfort, Pleasure and Health- 
restoring Equipment. Moderate Tariff. 
WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED PROSPECTUS. 

$MEDLCY$ 

Hydropathic EstablishmQnt 
M ATL OCK 



trrrTTT-rrTTTTTTrrrrrrrrni 



-rrtmrrrr^ ^^ 



MINEHEAD, SOM. 

STRAND PRIVATE HOTEL 

PROMENADE. 

IMMEDIATELY Facing Sea. Commanding Extensive Views of the 
Bristol Channel, North Hill, Moors, Golf Links, &c. Balcony extends 
entire length of Hotel. Electric Light. Baths (H. & C). 

Under Personal Supervision. Nearest Hotel to Golf Links. 

'Phone 144, Telegrams. "Strand Hotel." 

Tariff on Application. F. STEVENS, Proprietor. 

Monmouth— BEAUFORT ARMS HOTEL. 

First-class Tourist House. Finest Garage in the 
Wye Valley. Table d'Hote 7.30 p.m. Sep. Tables. 
Finest Cuisine and Wines at Moderate Charges. 
Telephone 10 Monmouth. Miss A. RAINBOW, Manageress. 

Mundesley-on Sea, Norfolk 

PDA MR UftTEl Nearest to Golf Links. 
UllHNLI llUlfcLi Two mins. fr. Beach. 
Hard Tennis Courts. Ball Room. Billiards. Garage. 
'Phone 22. A. E. WILLIXS, Proprietor. 



Mortehoe — Newcastle — Newquay 



43 



MORTEHOE. 

Woolacombe Bay, N. Devon. 

RATHLEIGH 

FIRST-CLASS PRIVATE HOTEL 

/"^LOSE to and Facing Sea. 

Vj Few minutes from Tennis 

and Golf. Garage Near. Sep. 

Tables. Good Cooking. Nursery 

Meals for Children (under iz 

years old) with Nurses. 

Inclusive Terms from £3 3. 

Winter Apartments. 

'Phone 4. Tels., " Rathleigh." 

Resident Proprietors, 

Mr. & Mrs. S. KELLY. 




Newcastle-on-Tyne— ST. 
MARGARETS HOTEL 



64 to 68, 

OSBORNE RD , 

JESMOND. 

This Commodious Hotel forms an Up-to-date Residence with con- 
veniences of ordinary Hotel. Garage near Hotel. Tels., " St. 
Margaret's, Osborne Road. Newcastle." 'Phone 453 Jesmond. 



New Forest 



(See page 37) 




V"^ NEWQUAY. 



TOLCARNE 

HOTEL. 

Facing Sea. First-class Ac- 
commodation for IOC Guests 
A. A. & E.A.C Finest Cuisine 
Service and Brightness. 
Dancing and Entertainment. 
Adjoining Bathing, Golf. Ten 
nis. &c. Lock-up Garages; 
Apply •'.MANAGER " ft 
Tariff Souvenir. 
Phone 176- 



NEWQUAY. CORNWALL. 




NARROW CLIFF 

Private Hotel. 

SEA View. Close to Bathing Beaches, 
Station and Public Tennis Courts. 
Electric Li^ht. Certificated Sanitation. 
Terms Moderate and Inclusive. Garage 
Near. Special Winter Terms. 

Mrs. VERRAN, 

Proprietress. 



44 



Newquay 



NEWQUAY. 

SITUATED on 
Pen tire Head- 
land facing Atlantic 
and Bay, with Excel- 
lent Sandy Bathing 
Beach. Glorious 
Coast Views from 
most Bedrooms. Ad- 
joining Golf Course. 
PrivateTeimis Court. 
Electric Light. Sep. 
Tables Garages. 
Mod .InclusiveTerms. 

Write for Tariff. 
'Phone 88. 

Mrs. MARTIN. 



PENDREA Private Hotel 




NEWQUAY. 



RUNNYMEDE 



I 




PRIVATE 
HOTEL 

(Under Entirely New 
Management!. 

C ITUATED in Best Part 
'-'of Newquay, facing Sea 
& Bathing Be'aches. Fine 
Views. Close to Station. 
Ex. Cuisine. Sep. Tables. 
E'.ec. Light. Perfect Sani- 
tation. Bath (H. &C). 
Every Comfort. Terms 
Moderate. Highly Recom- 
mended. Garage. Special 
Terms for Winter Months. 

R. WHEAILEY. 
''Phone 218. Proprietor. 



Newquay, Cornwall TREGWELLA 

PRIVATE HOTEL. High, Bracing Situation. Magnificent Sea 
View. A few minutes' walk from Sands, Golf Links and Tennis 
Courts. Separate Tables. Moderate and Inclusive Terms. 

Personal Supervision. 'Phone 197. Telegrams, "Trewella." 

Mr. & Mr s. J. C. MILL. 

PRIVATE 
HOTEL. 

Recently Enlarged & Improved. Finest Position on Sea Front, facing 
Atlantic Ocean. One minute from Sands. Garages. Nr. Station, Golf 
Links, Tennis Courts & Bowling Green. Home Comforts. Electric 
Light. Moderate Charges. Personal Supervision. 'Phone 159. 
Tels., " Kiilick, Trenance Hotel, Newquay." 
For Tariff, apply Mr. & Mrs." ROPER KILLICK. 



Newquay-TRENANCE 



Newquay, Cornwall-" BEACHCROFT" M, I K?K. ,AL 

Splendidly Situated in its Own Grounds of two-and-a-half acres, 
with Tennis and Croquet Lawns on Cliff edge. Within easy walking 
distance of the Celebrated Golf Links and Public Tennis Courts. 
L. B. COOMBE, Proprietor. 
Nat Til, Xo. 22. Tels., " Beachcroft, Newquay, Cornwall." 



Newquay BEACONSFIELD 



PRIVATE 

HOTEL, 

The Crescent. Finest Position on Sea Front. Overlooking Bathing 
Beaches. Near Golf Club, i min. to Beach, Pavilion, or Centre of 
Town. Mod. Inclu. Terms. Personal Supervision. Tariff on Appli- 
cation. Tels., " Beaconsfield, Newquay." 'Phone 172 Newquay. 
Mr. "& Mrs. H. WHEATLEY. 



Newquay — Oxford — Paignton 



45 



Newpiy CHATTERFIN f W£ 



iVATE 
L. 

Situated facing Sea&theTolcarne Bathing Beaches. 
Close to Tennis Courts & easy distance to Golf Links. 
Electric Light. Separate Tables. Moderate Tei mi. 

Mrs. C. HF.XWOOD, Proprietress. 

OXFORD. —First-class Family. Centre of High St. 
ESTABLISHED 1400. Eke. Light. 

Telephone 386. . '_, 

Billiard?. 

Morris's Garage. 
aphic Address—' - Mitre, Oxford." 
Night Porter. Apply C. J. VERT, Manager. 



leiepnoue ooO. ^^^^*^~ 



HOX^h 



UTD 



OXrOKD. 

Private and 
Residential Hotel, 

47 to 53, 1F5XEY ROAD 

Terms Moderate. 

Telephone 776 




Near Colleges ana River. 
Good Public Rooms. 
Private Sitting Rooms if required. 
Motor Garage. Small Garden. 
Miss BAKER, Proprietress. 



13 to 17, 
MAGDALEN STREET. 



Oxford-OXENFORD HALL, 

private ano Iftcstfccntial Ibotel. 

In the Centre of City. Near Colleges, and opposite Martyrs' Memorial. 
Terms Moderate. 'Phone 748. MISS WATSON. 

OXFORD— EASTGATE HOTEL. 

Situated in High Street, overlooking Magdalen 
College. Electric Light Throughout. Lounge. 
Terms Moderate. 'Phone 694. 
Mrs. COOMBES, Resident Proprietress. 

Paignton-HOTEL GR0SVEN0R 



/X\ 



Winter Terms- 
Summer Terms 



-31 guineas to 4 guineas. 

-4J guineas to 5| guineas. 

'Phone 270 Paignton. 



POULTRY BOOK 

By Dr. HARRY ROBERTS 

Editor of " The Cotintry Handbooks," <S-c, &>c. 
2/6 net. 

Illustrated with nearly 50 photographs. 

WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON, EC 4. 

MothersiM's Seasick Remedy 

Stops and Prevents Travel Sickness. 25 Years of Success. 



4 6 



Paignton — Penzance — Port Erin 



PAIGNTON, TORQUAY. 

GOODRINGTON HOUSE 

PRIYATE MOTEL. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND. An Ideal Summer and Winter Resort 




Taken i>y Aerco Aerials Ltd. 

FINEST Position on Toi Bay. Terms En Pension according to Season and 
Room. Electric Light. Two Large Lawns. Home Grown Fruit and 
Vegetables. Own Garage. Sate Bathing on Own Sandy Beach. Nearest 
to New Churston Golt Links. Two miles to Club House. No Roads to Cross. 
'Phone PAIGNTON 151. Apply to PROPRIETOR. 

Penzance WESTERN HOTEL. 

This Old-established Hotel will be found replete 
with every Comfort for Families and Commercials. 

'Phone No. 10. N. CHAMPION, Proprietor. 

Penzance CENTRAL HOTEL. 

OLD-ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL. 

Three minutes from Sea and Station. Electric Light Throughout. 
Spacious Garage and Stockroom. 'Phone 89. 
I. S. RICHARDS. Resident PropnVtor. 

Port Erin" SNAEFELL" p „T t ti. e 

Finest Position on Promenade. Facing Bay. Close to Links. 
Accommodation for 120 Visitors. Large Ball Room. Electric Light 
Throughout. Highly Recommended. Tariff on application. 
T. N. SCOTT, Proprietor. 

Port Erin, I M Headlands Private Hotel- 

Overlooking the Bay & Headlands. Adjoining Golf Links & Tennis. 
Garage. Personal Supervision 'Phone 64. Tariff, P. DANSON. 

^WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

BEST FOR THE HOME. 

BEST FOR THE HOLIDAY. 



Porthcawl — Portree — Rhyl — Rothbury — St. Austell 47 



Porthcawl 



ESPLANADE HOTEL —?.££- **&£& 



First-class Residential. Accom. for 150. Drawing Rooms, Lounges. 
Billiard Room. Music and Smoking Lounge. Moderate Charges. 
Nearest Licensed Hotel to Royal Porthcawl Golf Club. Sandy Soil. 
Mean temperature same as Bournemouth. Boating. Good Bathing. 
Sea Fishing. Pyle and Kenhg Golf Course 2 J miles, and Soutbern- 
down 7 miles distant. Apply MAXAGERI->>. 

PORTREE, SKYE . 

"Over the Sea to Skye." 

For a Charming and Health-giving Holiday, Magnificent Mountain 
and Loch Scenery, Rest, Romantic Interest, or Variety — 

VISIT THE ISLE OF SKYE. 

ROYAL HOTEL 

PORTREE, ISLE OF SKYE. 

The Largest and Finest Hotel in the Island. 

ISLE OF SKYE View Book. 

Twenty Magnificent Photos and Visitors 1 Guide, Is. 6d. 

J. SIMPSON, Portree. 




A BUNDANCE of Bright 
*^ Sunshine, Clear Days, 
no Fogs or Snow. Light 
Rainfall and Sandy Sub- 
soil. Excellent Train 
Service. As a visiting 
centre Rhyl is unsur- 
passed. The safest 
Bathing and Sands in the 
Kingdom. Plenty of 
Amusements. Muni- 

cipal Orchestra & Enter- 
tainments in New Pavil- 
1 30 and Marine Gardens. 

Illustrated Guide, List of Hotels, Boarding Houses and Apartments, Post tree 

2<L, from Dept., "W.D.," Town Hall, Rhyl. 

The Ideal NORTH WALES RESORT for all Seasons of the Year. 

The Best for Residential and Visiting. 



FOR HEALTH & PLEASURE. 



Rhyl 



W WfllPQ PI AQTIRIflM Private Hotel, facmg Sea. 

, fl. lldlCb rLftOllnlUn Five mins. fr. Pier & Golf 

Links. Smoke Rms., Lounge, & 40 Large Bedrooms. Elec. Light. 
Terms on application. 'Phone 170. W. L. MITCHELL, Prop'tress. 

Rothbury COUNTY HOTEL 

THE MOST PICTURESQUELY SITUATED HOTEL IN NORTH- 
UMBERLAND. Popular Resort for Motorists, Tourists, &c. 
Stands in its Own Grounds and Terraced Gardens. Overlooking the 
Slopes of Cragside, on the outskirts of the Historic Village of 
Rothbury, with Simonside T.'.O" ft. towering in the distance. 
Recreation Room. Gara?p. Billiards, Fishing, Croquet. Tenni?. Golf. 

Private 
Hotel. 

A.A., R.A.C. Over two acres of Charming Grounds. Two Good 
Tennis Courts. Garage. F.lectric Light Throughout. Excellent 
Cuisine. Separate Tables. i3 Hole Golf Course, ii miles. 
Good Centre for Whole of Cornish Riviera. 
'Phone 76. Telegrams, " Fairmead." 



St. Austell, Cornwall 



4 8 



St. Ives— Sandown 



ST. IVES, Cornwall. 

ST. IVES BAY HOTEL 

THE UP-TO-DATE HOTEL OF COMFORT AND CHARM. 
"LJOT and Cold running Water in all Bedrooms. 
Electric Light. Central Heating. Spacious 
Lounges. Excellent Cuisine. R.A.C. & A.A. 
Garage near. Terms on Application. 

Tels., " Bay Hotel, St. Ives, C." 'Phone 106. 

CHY-AN-DREA Residential Hotel. 

ST. IVES, CORNWALL. 



West Cornwall Golf Links. 
Beautifully situated, facing 
St. Ives Bay. Lovely 
Views from large Bay 
Windows. Dining, Draw- 
ing and Smoking Rooms 
face the Sea. Elec. Light 

Throughout. 
For Terms, apply 
Mrs. F.C. WHEELER, 
Proprietress. 
'Phone 76. 



ST. IVES. CORNWALL . 

"TREYESSA" 

PRIVATE AND 

RESIDENTIAL HOTEL. 

Adjoining Bathing Beach. 

Close to Golf Links and 

Tennis Courts. 

Garage Near. 

Special Winter Terms. 

'Phone St. Ives 43. 

Telegrams : Trevessa 

Hotel, St. Ives, Cornwall. 

Terms, Miss NEWTON, 

Resident Proprietress. 

Sandown, I. of W. C0LEF0RD 

PRIVATE HOTEL. Open all the Year. Ideal Situation, facing 
South and Bay. Tennis. Golf Putting. Garage. Gas Fires in 
Bedrooms. Separate Tables. Private Bathing Huts. Close Golf. 
Personal Supervision. 'Phone Sandown 148. 

Prospectus from RESIDENT PROPRIETORS. 





Sandown, I.W.— THE SANDRINGHAM TffiSS'ft 

Esplanade. Spacious Dining & Drawing Rooms, & Lounge. Terraced 
Garden. 'Phone fifi. Apply for Illustrated Tariff " M." 

Private Hotel & Boarding Establishment. 
— Finest Position, facing Sea. Terms 
H. A. CHILD, Proprietor. 



Sandown-Seagrove 

Moderate. 'Phone 65. 



Scarborough — Seaton — Shanklin 



Scarborough PAVILION 

■ j^^ ^p |p" ■ Two Private En Tout Cas Tennis Courts 
ff I adjoining. Most Convenient Hotel for 
■■^^ ■ ■■•■■ Ganton Golf Links. R.A.C., A.A. 
'Phone 10^0, 1041 i two lines). R. E. LAUGHTON. 

Scarborough PRINCE of WALES 

ljf|TE| -First-class. Facing South and Over- 
llwlfcii looking Bay. Enclosed Suites. Close 
to South Cliff Golf Links. Tels., " Princely," Scarboro'." 
'Ph,,n, 925, 926. H. FURNISS, Proprietor. 

Scarborough — CAMBRIDGE 

UATFI Sheltered Position, near Golf, Tennis, Spa, 
HI I fc L Gardens, Sands, &C. All Water in Hotel 
■ lw H «■■■■ softened by the PermutU- Patent System. 
R.A.C. A.A. Lift. Garage. 'Phone 222. 
Miss TAYLOR, Manageress. 

SCARBOROUGH— FAIR-VIEW Kte a ™ 

5 RONY SQUARE. Occupies Select & Central Position on South 
Cm., close Esplanade and immediately above the famous Spa. Five 
mins. walk to Bathing Pools and Italian Gardens. Commodious 
and Well-appointed Lounge, Writing Room, Dining and Drawing 
Rooms. Excellent Cuisine. Sep. Tables. Motor Garage adjoining. 

'Phone 841. Full Particulars from Mr. F. W. TAXSLEY. 

Scarborough-S W I F T ■ S "'SaVA™ - 

See Illustrated Advert, in Ward Lock's Yorkshire Guides. 
- L. B. SWIFT, Proprietor. 

SEATON, PEVON. -'atfiSa* 

ESPLANADE HOTEL ftsS. 

Electric Light Throughout. Hot and Cold Water in Bedrooms. 
Excellent Catering. Moderate Charges. Garage. 'Phone 6. 
Apply MANAGERESS. 

Shan kiln, I. W. CHANNEL VIEW 

MATp! Finest Position on Cliff, facing Sea. First-class & 
nUI CLi Thoroughly Up-to-date. Tennis Court, Croquet Lawn 

6 Putting Green. Billiards (full-size). Ex. Cuisine. Sep. Tables. 
Open all the Year. Garage. Cars for Hire. 'Phone 72 Shanklin. 

Mrs. PARSOXS & DAUGHTERS. Proprietresses. 

SHANKLIN, I.W.-CLIFTON e^PA'SIit. 

Premier Position on Keats Green. Old Established. Close to 
Chin'. Lift and Tennis Courts. Mrs. CLARK. Proprietress. 

QhonLlin TniMOfC I W Board Resident.— Cen. Position. 
OnanKiin IUWUI9, l.ll. Every Modern Convenience. An 
Ideal spot for a Holiday. Rubble & Grass Tennis Courts. Billiards. 
Cn.rmet. Howls. Moderate Tariff. Mr. & Mrs. W. L. GOULD 

SHANKLIN, I. of W.— " MILANESE " 

BoardingEstablishment.^TRES^L^ 1 ^ 

Series, 1926-27] 4 



50 Shanklin — Sidmouth — Southport — Stratford 

SHANKLIN, I. of W. — BLENHEIM 

PRIVATE HOTEL. High-class Board-Residence, Facing Sea, on 
Keats Green. Illustrated Tariff. Mrs. E. F. SHORTT. 

Shanklin, I.W.-THE GRANGE, &S£°K&l. 

r Stands in its Own Beautiful Grounds. Replete with Every Com- 
fort. 'Phone 154 Shanklin. S. J. CLARK. Proprietor 

SIDMOUTH, S. Dsvon-NORTON GARTH BBS? 

Pleasantly Situated. Facing South and Sea. Garden. Sanitary 
Certificate. Golf, Tennis and Croquet. Coaching and Steamer 
Excursions. Electric Light Throughout and Gas Fires in all 
Bedrooms. Special Winter Terms. 'Phone 172. 
Mrs. E. A. FINCH, Proprietress. 

Southampton "HAMTUN HOUSE HOTEL, 

Private & Residential, Hulse Road. — In Select Residential Neigh- 
bourhood. Close to the Avenue, Common, Tennis and Croquet 
Clubs, Golf Links, and Cricket Ground. Three minutes to Trams. 
Well-appointed Throughout. Cuisine Excellent. Tariff Moderate. 
Tel. No. 2766. Tels., "Hamtun Louse, Southampton." 
Full particulars from The MANAGERESS. 

Southport— PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL. 

"THE LEADING HOTEL." Great Golf Centre. Garage. Home 
Farm. Also ROYAL HOTEL. Best Position on Promenade. 

Southport-KENWORTHY'S HYDRO, ^nfiy^ 

Most Central Lift. Turkish, Elec. & all Baths & Treatment. Fr. 
12/-dailv. 'Phone 80. Tels.. "KenworthvV' ' MANAGERESS. 

Southport Hesketh Park Hydro Ltd.- 

Premier Hydro. Electric Lift. Tennis. Close Sea and Golf Links. 
Illustrated Tariff. 'Phone 1355. Telegrams, " Rockley." 

Stratford-on-Avon-AVONHURST 

BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT, JOHN STREET. 

Central. Convenient and Comfortable. Good 
Cooking. Near Large Garage. Moderate Terms. 
Personal Supervision. Miss WiLDBLOOD. Proprietress 

Stratford - on - Avon-THE SHAKESPEARE 
GALLERY RESTAURANT. Right in the 

Centre of the Town. Small and Large Parties 
Catered for. FREE GARAGE. Telephone 177. 

FOR THE SPORTSMAN ON HOLIDAY. 2s. 6d. Net 

HOW TO PLAY HOCKEY 

A New Treatise on the Game 

By H. E. HASLAM 

(English International, Olympic Games, 1920). 

A Special Section deals with THE WOMAN'S GAME. By the late 

Eustace E. White, the leading authority on Hockey for Women, &c. 

Illustrated with over 30 Full-page Plates and many Diagrams. 

WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON, E.C.4. 



Teicrnmouth — Tenby 



TEIGNMOUTH. 

The PORTLAND 

PRIVATE HOTEL. 

CEA Front. Facing Pier, Den 
Gardens, Bowling Green, &c. 
Electric Light. Central Heating. 
Separate Tables. Lounge. 
30 Bedrooms. Tariff. 

Mr. & Mrs. BUCKXELL. 




Teignmoutli, S. Devon-BELLA VISTA 

PRIVATE HOTEL. Tne Eouse Nearest the Sea. Open all the year 
round. Specially adapted for Winter Residence. & Occupies Finest 
Position on Esplanade, Facing Sea. Conveniently Situated for Golf, 
Tennis Courts, &c. Own Garden Produce & Poultry. Elec. Light. 
'Phone 134. Write for Tariff, Mrs. A. HICK, Proprietress. 

TEIGNMOUTH. — Ideal Position on Sea Front. 



South Aspect. Within a icx 
yards of Sea ~ 

EASTCUFF 



PRIVATE 



HOTEL. 



Gas Fi 



iBedr 



Especially Suitable for Winter Residence. 



I.Lht. Mod. Tari-T. 



■Pho 



183. 



App'yJ. MOKRISH. 



Teignmouth-The CRESCENT BsE 1 

1, Den Crescent. Conyeniently Situated on Esplanade. Facing 
Sea. Electric Light. Separate Tables. Moderate Tariff. 
Under the Personal Supervision of the President Proprietresses, 
Mrs. GRICE and Miss LIUDICOAT. 



Tenby— ROYAL 
HOTEL. 



GATEHOUSE 



Facing Sea. Premier Hotel. Electric Lift 
to all Floors. Electric Light. Nearest 

Hotel to Golf and Station. Commodious GARAGE and Private 

Lock-aps. Officially Appointed R.A.C., M.U. and A.A. 'Phone 12. 

Telegrams, "Gatehouse." Miss BEARD, Proprietress. 

Also ROYAL LION hOTEL. 



Tenby C0B0URG HOTEL 



Established 
Over a Cen- 
tury. Fully 
Licensed. Delightfully Situated, Facing Sea. Ideal Winter and 
Summer Residence. Renowned for Cuisine and Comfort. Large 
Fully-equipped Garage. 'Phone 9. Tels., " Cobourg, Tenby." 
Proprietress, Mrs. HUGHES. 

^WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

BEST FOR THE HOME. 

BEST FOR THE HOLIDAY. 



52 



TORQUAY. 



Torquay 



GRAND HOTEL. ^L Na 




OCCUPIES the Best and Most Convenient Position on Sea Front, 
Coi"nman8:ng Unequalled Views of Torbay. The Bes,t Equipped 
and M< st Luxur.ous Hotel in the West of England. Hot and Cold Water 
anl R d ators in "Every Room in addrtion to Central Heating. Self- 
contained Suites, also Bedrooms with Communicating Bathrooms. Nearest 
Railway Station. Garage. Ball Room. Orchestra. Hard Tennis 
Court. 'Phone 13V 



TORQUAY. 



ROSLIN HALL 

Premier Private Hotel on English Riviera. 




/"^HARMINGLY Situated on Sea Front and Level, in Own Picturesque 
Grounds. Beautihil Ball Room with parquet floor. Tennis. Billiards. 
Cuisine a Speciality. Central Heating. New Garage. Inclusive Terms. 



'Phone 2113. 



Mrs. V. F. GRESHAM, Resident Proprietress. 



Torquay 



53 



TORQUAY. 

LINKS HOTEL 

Adjacent to Babbacombe's Famous Downs 
and Petitor's Glorious Coastal Walks. 

NEAREST Hotel to Golf Links (one minute's walk). 
Officially Appointed R.A.C. and A.A. Hotel. Good- 
class Residential Hotel. Fine Lounge. Smoke Room. 
Billiard Room. Bali Room. Hot and Cold Water and 
Central Heating Radiators in Bedrooms. All-weather 
Tennis Court (Championship size). First-class Garage and 
Workshop. Near to Sea. Few minutes to Town. Excellent 
Cuisine and Wines. Lunches. Teas. Dinners. 

'Phone St. Marychurch 7791. Brochure on application. 

T. S. CROCKFORD, Proprietor. 



TORQUAY. 

DELIGHTFUL Situatioi 
on Sea Front. Charming 
and Extensive Grounds lacint 
Tor Bay. Tennis, Croquet, 
Billiards. Dancing. 

Electric Light. Central 
Heating and all Modern 
Conveniences 

GARAGE. 
Excellent Cuisine and Wines. 
Terms a ia Carte or 
En Pension. 
Tels., "Beigrave notel." 
Telephone 62. 
A. BAKER, Proprietress. 



BELGRAVE HOTEL 





TORQUAY. 

KISTOR 

Private Hotel, Belgrave Road. 

Situated in Own Grounds, 
facing Tor Bay. I rain. fr. Sea 
Front & Electric Cars. Easy 
access to new Medical Baths. 
Central Heating and Elec- 
tric Lighting Throughout. 
Large Reception Rooms, 
Lounge, &c. Tennis. Croquet. 
Excellent Cuisine. GARAGE 

A. BAKER, 
'Phone 325. Proprietress. 



54 



Torquay 



TORQUAY. 

FACING SOUTH. 

BUTE COURT 

High-Class Private Hotel, 

BELGRAVE ROAD. 

CHARMINGLY situated in own 
grounds facing Sea Front : 
Sheltered Position : Private VValk 
£0 Sands through Gary Park ; nr. 
Me.ii«] Baths, Station, Princess 
Gardens, Pier, Pavilion, Golf and 
Tennis Os. Every Convenience. 
Spacious Rms. Smoking Loungo 
B lliaids. Centrai Heated. Cro- 
quet. Own Garages. 

Mr. & Mrs. BOND. 
'Phone 143. Proprietors. 




Also INGLEWOOD First-class Private Hotel, 

BELGRAVE RO\D. 



TORQUAY - ALLERDALE HOTELS™"- 

Listed R.A.C. 
CiOUTII Aspect. Facin? 
<""► Sea. Large Sheltered 
Garden abutting Grounds 
if Tennis Si Croquet Club, 
with Private Walk to Sea, 
avoiding all hills (two 
xinutes). Inclusive Terms. 
Central Heating. Electric 
Li?ht. Separate Tables. 
Large Fully Equipped 
arage. lelephcne 667. 
Mr. & Mrs. C. R. EVANS, 
Resident Proprietors. 

TORQUAY. 

TOURAINE HOTEL 

SOUTH Aspect With Splen- 
did Sea Views. Near 
Theatre, Pavilion, Two Golf 
Courses. H.W. Radiators and 
fixed basins with constant hot 
and cold water supply in Bed- 
rooms. Five Bathrooms. Elec. 
Light. Own Tennis Court. 

First-class Cuisine. 
For Illustrated Tariff Applv 
LOC K\\ OOD MARSHALL, 
Telephone IBS. M4\'*ofr. 






VILLA BELZA res hSt^ ,al 



HOTEL 

ONE of Torquay's famous Villa Resi- 
dences. Ideal Situation, due South. 
commanding Unequalled Views, includ- 
ing 1 the whole of Torbay. Spacious 
Lounges. Elec. Light Throughout. 
Ex. Cuisine. Good Service. Noise-proof 
double Windows (fronting Sea). 

Terms from £3 3s. Good Chef. 

WINTER.— Owing to its sheltered posi- 
tion. Villa Belza can he strongly recom- 
mended as a Winter Residence, being 
protected from all north & cast winds, 
and with its Southern Aspect obtains 
all the Sun of the day. 
Personal Supervision of Proprietors 

Mr. & Mrs. J. DENHAM BROWN. 
Telephone No. 72. 
Tc'cgrams, " Villa Belza. Torquay." 



TORQUAY . 

A REALLY Com'ort- 
r.ble, Well Managed 
Hotel. Personally Super- 
vi: e 1 by the Re ident 
Proprietress with the 
ass'itance of her Jong 
established, highly 
efficient and most willing 
Staff. Apply for Tariff. 
'Phone 3759. 



Torquay 

"EDENHURST. 



55 




TORQUAY. 

8 O XT mi 



XX. X. 




HOUSE 
PRIVATE HOTEL. 

Situated in Ideal Position ju^t 
above Strand. Overlooking 
Bay. Splendid Views. ' Five 
acres of ground. Italian Gar- 
den. Tennis Couit. Garage. 
Within easy access of many 
ifaces of Interest. Personal 
Supervision. Ex. Cuisine. 
Individual Comfort of Guests 
studied. Terms from 4 gns. 
A.A. 'Phone 1087. 
Mrs. C. G. KF.NNAWAY. 



TORQUAY. 

MARSWORTN 

PRIVATE HOTEt. 

JS/IAGNJFICEN'T Views. 
' Five mins. fr. Shops, 
Trams.Gardens & Medical 
Baths. E!ec. Light. Sep. 
Tables. Excellent Cuisine. 
Billiards. Terms fir in 3} 
guineas. Special Winter 
Terms. 'Phone 78. 

Resident Proprietress, 
Mrs. H. E. BF.ESON. 




View from Balcony.' 



TORQUAY 




CON HOVSB 
Private Hotel. 

Beautiful Situation. South Aspect. 
On level with Medical Baths. 
Lovely Views of Torbay & surround- 
ing Scenery. Sheltered from N. & E. 
Winds. Central Position. Excel- 
lent and varied Cuisine. Large 
Drawing Rooms opening on 
Balconies. Billiard and Smoke 
Rooms. Baths (H. & C). 
Term-, Apply 'Phone No. 391. 
Mrs. COOMBES CROSSLEY, 
Resident Proprietress. 

Also MARSDEN LODGE 

Boarding House, 
'Phone 531. MORGAN AVENUE. 



56 



TORQUAY, 




Torquay 

BELFIELD High-class Private Hotel, 

CROFT ROAD. 

IDEAL. Standing in Own 
Grounds and Park. Unique 
Position. Facing South. Entirely 
sheltered from N. & E. winds. 
Overlooking Bay. Magnificent Sea 
nnd Landscape Views. Summer 
and Winter Resort. Every Com- 
fort and Good Cuisine. Personal 
Supervision. Tels., "Belfield, 
Croft Road, Torquay." 

For Terms apply 
HOGGETT & RICHARDSON, 
Proprietors. 



TORQUAY. 

SENLAC 

Private Hotel, 
LINCOMBE DRIVE. 

Th I R ST-C LASS. Own 
■*■ Grounds. Commanding 
Corner Site. Convenient for 
Sea, Medical 3aths, Trams. 
Shops and Golf. Electric 

Light Throughout. Persona! 
Supervision. Visitors met 
by Own Private Car. 

Tels. , " Senlac, Torquay." 
Mr. & MRS. 

m. h. kingston'. 
Proprietors. 




TORQUAY. 




HOTEL SYRACUSE 



MEADFOOT ROAD. 

IDEAL Position, facing South. 
In Best Part of Torquay. 
Two acres of Beautiful Grounds. 
Garage. Croquet. Electric 
Light. / Bathrooms on each 
Floor. Separate Tables. Five 
minutes' walk to Meadfoot 
Beach, best Shops, Tennis Cts. 
(Hard) and Bay. Two minutes 
from famous Lincombe Drive. 
'Bus passes Hotel. 'Phone 2167. 

Mr. & Mrs. KERN, 

Proprietors. 



TORQUAY. ' 

KINELLAN 

Boarding Establishment. 

OVERLOOKING Torwood Gardens. 
Splendidly Situated. Facing South. 
Three minutes from Sea, Pavilion, Principal 
.Shops, Medical Baths, cvc. Good Cuisine. 
Separate Tables. Electric Heating. Board- 
Residence or Private Apartments. Terms 
from 2£ guineas. 'Phone 1250 Torquay. 

Mrs. A. C. MAGNUS, Proprietress. 




Torquay 



57 



TORQUAY. 




Newburgh Private Hotel 

BELGRAVE CRESCENT. 

CHARMINGLY Situated. Facing South 
^ and commanding full Sea Views and 
overlooking Private Park and Tennis Courts. 
Visitors have the privilege of using Private 
Path by Tennis Courts to Sea Front, about 
three minutes' walk. Five minutes from 
Station and near to Pier, Trams and Shop- 
ping. Dining and Drawing Rooms command 
full Sea Views. Separate Tables. Reduced 
Terms for Winter. 'Phone 792. Wireless. 

C. & G. r "WELL, Proprietors. 



Torquay. CLYDESDALE PRIVATE HOTEL 

(Temperance), 
CROFT ROAD. 

CONVENIENTLY Situated. 
Near Sea Front, Station, 
Rock Gardens, Pavilion, Pier 
and Tennis Courts, and is 
within easy reach of the Prin- 
cipal Churches. Easy access 
to any part of the Town. 

Special Winter Terms. 

Under Personal Supervision o 1 

The PROPRIETRESS. 




Torquay. SEASCAPE PRIVATE HOTEL 

ABSOLUTELY Premier 
Position. Summer and 
Winter. Facing South. Mag. 
Sea, Coast & Woodland Views. 
Near Garage. Central Every- 
thing. Central Heated. Gar- 
den and Beautiful Park Walk 
towards Sea. Electric Light 
Throughout. Motor Tours and 
Picnics Arranged. Hud Tennis 
Courts. 'Phone 18. 

C. HARRISON, 

pROPRIFTOR. 





#-3 




>«§» Ji^^l 


^*&T '" £jffifaj 


Br '""" hH 



TORQUAY. 



A DELIGHTFUL Marine 
Mansion standing in 3 acres 
of Semi-tropical Grounds, facing 
South & Completely Sheltered fr. 
N. & E. Winds. Most Central, 
being- only 1 minute fr. Medical 
Baths, Pavilion. Trams, Strand, 
Shop; & all Amusements. Mag- 
nificent Covered Promenade 
Verandah Overlooking Harbour 
& whole of Torbay. Ideal Winter 
Residence. Central Heating. 

Gas Fires in all Bedrooms- 
Billiaf Is. Garage. 'Phone 3434. 
Under Personal Supervision of 

MRS. M. BAGLEY 
date Chatsworth Hotel, Llandudno). 



PARK HALL, 



First-class 
Private Hotel. 




58 



Torquay 



TORQUAY. 



P3T-M COURT KOT£l. 




PALM 
COURT 

"P IN EST Centra! 
-L Position on Sea 
Front. Comfort. 
Refinement, Moder- 
ate Charges. Par- 
ticulars and Booklet 
write, 
Mrs. W. PURKI5, 
Proprietress. 
'Phone 2187. 



TORQUAY 

Delightfully Situated in Own Grounds. Facing South 

Overlooking Tor Abbey and Bay 

Ideal Summer and Winter 

Residence. Excellent 

Cuisine 

Garage. ^^^"^ £• 




Electric Lighting 
and Central Heating. 
Near Sea, Pavilion, Trams and 
Station. 
Tels., " Edmonds, Toorak, Torquay.' : 



'Phone 50 Torquay 



F. & E. EDMONDS. 



TORQUAY 

SOUTH DEVON 

PRIVATE HOTEL, 

St. Margarets Road, St, Marychurch. 

CTANDS in Own Beautiful Grounds with Magnificent Views of Haytor 
•^ and the Moorlands. Within few minutes of iS-hole Golf Course and 
Tennis Courts, Babbacombe Beach and other attractions. Separate 
Tables. Electric Light. Garage. Baths. Billiards. Reasonable Tariff. 
Apply earlv for List of Vacancies. 

'Phone Mr. & Mrs. COLVILLE SMITH. 

PRIVATE 
HOTEL. 

Splendid Situation. Facing South. Tennis Court. Beautiful 
Views of Sea and Land. Billiards. Croquet. Garage. Personal 
Supervision For Tariff, apply to Mr. & Mrs V. ADAMS 

'Phone 2868. (l^ate Managers of Touraine 

Tels., "Abbev Court." . Private Hotel, Torquay'. 



Torquay ABBEY COURT 



HOLIDAY DELIGHTS 



A DECK CHAIR AND 



^WINDSOR MAGAZINE 



Torquay — Ventnor — Weymouth — Worcester 59 



TORQUAY, S. Devon.— Pleasantly Situated 200 it. 
above Sea. Easy Access 
Every Comfort. 



BK 



MAPfOH 



B 



EST^U 



SHWtHT. 



upei 



Good Cuisine 

Elec. L ig ht Throughout. 
Paths (H. & C). Mod. and In:. T e ,ms. 
i-ision. Miss KIX. Proprietress. 



10FC[ll3.y btOnBllSll. descent.— Very Sheltered. South Aspect. 
Close to Sea, Pier & Gardens. Tennis & Croquet Courts. Garage 
Near. 'Phone 775. Mrs. & Misses HOLE. Proprietresses. 

Toiyn-on-Sea-CORBETT HOTEL 

First-class. Magnificent Mountain Views. Near Golf Course. 
Tennis Courts. 50 Bedrooms. Recreation Room. Electric Light. 
Garage. R.A.C., A.A., M.U. Special Spring and Winter Terms. 
Tels., "Stephens, Towyn." 'Phone 9. 

TRURO. 



class. Best Centre for Tourists. 



Lock-up Garate. 



eo 



L.I 



OH 



HO 



T £L 



meets all Trains. 
For Terms, apply 
RESIDENT PROPRIETOR. 



VEMT m N0R ' ."f HOTEL MARINA, 

M3.11D6 F9.r3.QG. Best Position Overlooking Beach. All 
Front Rooms afford Channel View. Near Pier. Billiards. Gas 
Fires in Bedrooms. Ideal Winter and Summer. Individual 
Attention. 'Phune Ventnor 32. Tels., " Sunshine, Ventnor." 
Write MANAGERESS. 

WEYMOUTH. 

THE ROYAL HOTEL <l,m,ted) 

The LEADING AND ONLY MODERN HOTEL IN WEYMOUTH. 

Directly Faring Sea. Central Heating. Lift. Bath Rooms on each 
Floor. All Public Rooms, Private Sitting Rooms, and most Bedrooms 
face the Sea. R.A.C. and A.A. Large Garage. Inspection Pit. 
Petrol. Tel. No. 262. Tariff sent on Application. 

Weymouth HOTEL BURDON. 

On Sea Front. Public Rooms face Sea. 

R.A.C, A.A. and M.U. 'Phone No. 144. 

F. SEFTON SMITH, Proprietor. 

Windermere-Christopherson' s %!2£%^A^& 

and Tourists. Near Station. Baths (H. & C). Coach Bookings. 
Bed and Breakfast, 6/- Miss CHR1STOPHERSON, Prop tres g . 

Worcester CROWN HOTEL r-BHSL'HLH 

all Places of Interest. Close to Cathedral & Royal Porcelain Works. 
Garage. Telephone 338. Miss GODFREY, Manageress. 



6o 



■ ENTIRELY NEW EDITION ■ 

Mrs. BEETON'S 

HOUSEHOLD 
MANAGEMENT 

Size8$X5§ in. Strongly Bound - 12 6 net. 

Also in Half-Morocco - - - 25/- net. 

And Half -Calf - - - 31/& net. 

Containing over 4,000 Recipes, besides 32 Plates in Colour and 
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Times change, a^.d Mrs. Beeton changes with them. New 
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A few of the subjects included : — 

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Invalid Cookery Household Work 

Vegetarian Cookery Servants 

Chafing-Dish Cookery Labour-Saving 

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Fuelless Cookery Etiquette 

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Table Decorations The Home Doctor 

Meals and Menus Sick Nursing 
The Folding of Table Napkins Care of Children 

Beverages The Home Lawyer 

Neither time nor expense has been spared to en- 
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shall remain as it has always been — 

" The Best Cookery Book in the World." 

■ Ward, Lock <i~ Co., Ltd., London and Melbourne. 9 



6i 



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Contains about 2,500 Recipes, 768 pages, including instructions for all 
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Containing over 2,000 practical Recipes and comprehensive instructions 
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Contains about 650 Recipes for Everyday Dishes and General Instruc- 
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Containing about 350 Practical and Economical Recipes for everyday 
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House and Estate 

Agents* 

Auctioneers* 

and 

Valuers' Directory. 





§g 



Series, 1926-27] 



6 



66 



Index 



INDEX. 





PAGE 




PAGE 


Bath 


.. 67 


Newquay . . 


.. 69 


Bexhill 


.. 67 


Paignton 


.. 69 


Bideford 


.. 67 


Ramsey, I. of M. 


.. 69 


Bognor 


.. 67 


Ramsgate 


.. 69 






St. Margaret's Bay 


. . 70 


Bournemouth . . 


.. 67 










Sandown 


. . 70 


Bristol 


.. 67 










Scarborough . . 


• 70 


Buxton 


.. 67 










Seaview. 


• 7° 


Eastbourne 


" .. 67 










Shanklin 


• 7° 


Exeter 


.. 70 










Southampton . . 


• 70 


Falmouth 


.. 68 










Southport 


• 7° 


Freshwater 


... 71 










Swanage 


• 7° 


Gorleston 


.. 63 










Tankerton . . 


• 7 1 


Great Yarmouth 


.. 68 










Teignmouth 


. 70 


Guernsey 


.. 68 










Tenby . . . . 


. 70 


Harrogate 


.. 68 










Torquay 


. 70 


Ilfracombe 


. . 68 


' 








Totland Bay . . 


• 7i 


London 


.. 69 


Weymouth . . , 


• 7i 


Malvern 


.. 69 


Whitstable 


• 7i 


Margate 


.. 69 


Windermere . . 


• 7i 


Minehead 


.. 69 


Yarmouth (Great) 


. 68 



Auctioneers, Estate Agents, &c. 



Bath POWELL & POWELL, Ltd. 

HOUSE and ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS and 

iovjiK. Warehousini 
'Phone 18 (2 linos). 



yjinrpC Illustrated Lists Free. Removal*. Warehousing. 



Bath FORTT, HATT & BILLINGS, F.A.I. 

House and Estate Agents, Auctioneers and 
Valuers. List of all available Properties may be obtained on 
application. Removals toy Road or Rail, and 
Warehousing. Telephone 1488 (two lines). 

Bexhill-on-Sea— HOUSE AGENTS. 

GORDON GREEN & WEBBER. Head Office— 3, Sea Road. 
'Phones 410 Bexhill and 93, Cooden Beach. 

Bidef ord & Westward Ho ! -R. DYMOND & SON, 

Bank Chambers, Bideford. — Auctioneers and Valuers. House and 
Estate Agents. Motor and Carriage Proprietors. "Phone 25. 

B0CN0R TREGEAR & SONS, 

HOUSE AGENTS, 6, LONDON ROAD. 'Phone 140. 
Also at ALDWICK ROAD, WEST BOGNOR, 
'Phone 243, and Felpham, 'Phone 463. Furnished 
Houses to Let and Properties for Sale. 



BOURNEMOUTH. 

House Agents. 

LANE&SMITH 

Estab. 1875. 'Phone 35. 



HOUSES FOR SALE& TO LET 

Furnished. Residential Centres 

Bureau. Illustrated Guide and 

Map Free on application. 

81, Old Christchurch Road. 



BOURNEMOUTH REBBECK BROS. ^^'H 

Houses in Town and District. Lists Free. Established 1845. 
Othcfcs : Gcrvis Place, Bournemouth, & County G ates, Westbourne. 

BRISTOL-DAVEY & CO., Ltd., SU'SfSS 

Clifton Down Station). Estate and House Agent?, Auctioneers 
and Valuers. Established 70 years. 'Phone 4852. 

Buxton HAYES & SON, 

THE RESIDENT AGENTS, 3, THE QUADRANT. 

For all Available Properties for Sale and Furnished 
Houses. Property Register Free. 
'Phone 515. Teleg rams "Alert." 

Eastbourne—- house agents, 
cadiuuunit; Rating and General Valuers ^ 

Auctioneers and Building Surveyors. 

HAMRI YNQ' 51 - 53 < seaside rd. 

ffl ft If I D la I HO -phone & Tels., 896 " Eastbounn." 



63 



Auctioneers, Estate Agenta.r&c. 



FALMOUTH. 

CORLYON&SOttS 

F.A.I. 

Telegrams," "Corlyon, '.'. ' 

.Auctioneer, Falmouth." 
Telephone 138 



Auctioneers, Surveyors and Valuers. House, 
Estate, Stripping and Insurance Agents. 
Stock and 8hare Brokers. Properties. 

Offices : 

Central Auction Chambers, 

20, MARKET STREET. 



Falmouth 



ROWE & KNOWLES, 

House and Estate Agents, 

STRAND, FALMOUTH. 

Tels.. " Rowe Knowles." 



Gorleston-on-Sea andE 



A,V.George, Aucl 



Valuer, & 



Coast. " 
House A*ent. 500 Furnished "Houses on Register. 
'Phone Gorleston 58. 'Phone Lowestoft 344. 'Phone Yarmouth 464 

fit YflPmmith # nidtrirt E - A - PALMER, F.A.I m Auctioneer, Valuer 

Ul. IdllliUUlll a L/l&LUll,- & Estate Agent,26, Regent St., &86, High 

Si., Gorieston-on-Sea, Lowestoft. For Furnished Houses. Registerof 

Property to be Sold or LET. 'Phone 271 Yarmouth or 87 Gorleston. 

Guernsey LOVELL & CO., Ltd. 

HOUSE and ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS and 

VAIIIFR^ Removals and Warehousing. List of Properties 

Harrogate-JOHN DAY & SONS 't&SZSS^. 

Princes Square. — Harrogate &District Edition or the ' Homeftnder " 
__ Freeon applctn. Tels., "Days, Harrogate." 'PaoneSS Harrogate. 

W. C. HUTCHINGS, 
F.A.I., Leading House 

Furnished Houses and Apart- 
" Homelinder " Property Register 
'Phone 138. 



Ilfracombe, N. 



& Estate Agent. 

ments secured, 
on application. ■ 



ILFRACOfVSBE and District- 

W. L. CATHCART'S HO e uil liab,e 

for Furnished & Unfurnished Houses, . «/<euTQ 

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FOR THE GOLFER ON HOLIDAY. 

A new and authoritative work on how to improve your game. 

ALL ABOUT GOLF 

By BERT SEYMOUR. 

Winner of the "News of the World " Tournament, 1921. and the Esses 

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Illustrated with 33 Action-Photographs and many Diagrams- 

Cloth. 3/- »Te*. 



WARD, LOCK & GO.. LTD.. SALISBURY SQUARE, LONDON, E.C.4. 



Auctioneers, Estate Agents, <5c. 69 

LONDON (All Parts). " " 

FOR HOUSES, FLATS, SHOPS, OFFICES, FACTORIES, AND ALL 
KIXDS OF INVESTMENTS, GROUND RENTS, &c., apply to 

Messrs. SALTER, REX & Co. 

Cbartercd Surfers anD Hnctioneers, 

2LanD,' Ibonse, anD Estate agents, 

311, KENTISH TOWN ROAD, LONDON, N.W.5, Tel. Hampstead 4042-8. 

121,- CHEAPSIDE, E.Cf.2. ' Tel. C»/y 8394-5. 
Rents Collected. Estates Managed. Valuations for all Purposes. 

Rating Experts. Assessment Appeals Conducted. 

I ATlflftn — C. C.& T. MOORE, Managers of House Property, Auctroneera, 
LUliUUil City Office Agents. House Property Sales at the Auction 

Mart. E.C., on ThursdaysMbeld continuously for 91 yeafs). 

Chief Offices — 13, Lime Street. London. EX. 3. 



Malvern 

Descriptive List Free. 



J. G. LEAR & SON, F.A.I., 
AUCTIONEERS AND ESTATE AGENTS. 

Established 60 years. Telephone 160 



MARGATE HOUSE AGENTS. 

TAYLER & PATTERSON, 

103, Northdown Road, 85, Canterbury Road, 

CLIFTON VILLE. 'Phone 410. WEST3R00K. 'Phone 667. 

Minphaarl to PYmrtnr- c - F - J - Richardson, House, Land ana 

lUTUcliodil a JjAIHUUI Estate Agent, 17, The Avenue (Close Minehead 
Station). Register of Furnished & Unfurnished Houses. 'Phone63. 
Tels., " Richardson, Auctioneer, Minehead." Register Free. 



LEADING 

HOUSE 

AGENTS. 

(CORNWALL. V JOHN JULIAN & Co., Ltd. 

Write for Free Liat of Honge». Phone 86. 




PflifJntflTl— House ^^ Estate Agent, Auctioneer, Valuer, &c. For 

l U1511IUU Particulars of all available Properties For Sale and to be 

Let, Furnished or Unfurnished, in Paignton, Preston and Neigh- 

- bburhood, apply to J. RINTOUL, F.A.L, Hyde Road Corner. 

(Telephone 5323). Specially Selected Lists of Residences for Sale 

Furnished Houses and Flats, Boarding and Apartment Houses' 

Business Premises. Building Sites, &c , Post Free on Application' 

RAMSEY, I.O.M. -T. A. FARGHER, ft^M 

ESTATE AGENT. Furnishedand Unfurnished Houses to Let and for 

Sale. Select Private Apartments. Choice Freehold Building Sites. 
'Phone 59. Tels., " Fargher, Ramsey.-Man." 



TEE PRINCIPAL 

HOUSE and - - 
ESTATE AGENTS. 

'Phone 60. HOLNESS & OVENDEN, 37, High Street 



RAMSCATE 



jo Auctioneers, Estate Agents, &c. 

St. Margaret's Bay, g^-FLASHMAN & Co., Ltd. 

HOUSE & ESTATE AGENTS, MARKET SQUARE, DOVER. 
Local Representative, Mr. A. E. DOUBLEDAY, St. Margarets-at-Clift. 

Sandown & District, LWrJnun ™d" c £stat u e 

AGENT AND AUCTIONEER, 24, High Street. Lists of Furnished 
Houses and Apartments on Application. 

SCARBOROUGH House Agent. 

WALTER HARLAND, 13, Huntriss Row. 

Particulars of every House and Shop for Sale with Vacant 
Possession on application Free. 'Phone 67 (2 lines). 

SEAVIEW, Nr. Hyde, I. of W House & Estate 
V Agents. WATSON BROS, fa,) 

Isle of Wight house & estate agent, 
A. E. MORRIS, f^Shanklin 

and Branches. 'Phone 151. Tels., "Morris, Auctioneer, 

Shanklin." 

CAn+h«mn < fAN (including the New Forest and Southern 
OOUlDdnipiUn Districts). WALLER & KDIG, F.A.I., Auc- 
tioneers, Valuers, House, Land & Estate Agents. Auction Mart, 
Above Bar, Southampton. Estab. over roo years. 'Phone 2730. 

SOUTHPORT-C. S. GREENWOOD, F.A.I., Lord 15 i< re et. 

Prompt and Personal Attention to all House and Estate Business, 
Property on Sale, To Let, &c, Furnished Houses, fee. Tel. 2082. 

Quran aff P" Woodford White & Howell, 

**■''** ■■**&** Auctioneers & Valuers. Oldest Established & 
Leading House Agents. Nearly Opposite Post Office. 'Phone 15. 

Teignmonth-ROBT. FROST & SON, %&££"& 

Valuers. Note Address — Corner of Station Road, facing Regent St. 
Monthly Register Gratis and Post Free on application. 'Phone 89. 

Tenby-FRANK B. MASON & Co M ^S™STS 

Agents, Auctioneers, Valuers & Antique Dealers. EST. 70 YEARS. 

List of Houses and Apartments. 'Phone 7. 

TORQUAY House Agents, &c 

G. R. SMITH & SON, 9, STRAND. 

Illustrated Register of 60 pages (post free) of Houses & Estates. 
Also Special Lists of Private Hotels and Boarding Houses to be 
Sold or Let in Torquay and South Devon 'Phone 14. 

TORQUAY AND. EXETER-w. brook* oo, Ltd., 

House Furnishers, Removal Contractors, Undertakers, &c. 
TeL 203 Torquay. Tel. 115 Exeter. 



Auctioneers, Estate Agents, &c. 71 

TOTLAND BAY& FRESHWATER 

For Houses, Furnished or Unfurnished, Properties 
for Sale or Building Sites, Valuations. Apply to — 
W. J. WATER HOUSE, Estate Office, Totland Bay, 
Isle of Wight. 'Phone 18 Freshwater. 

Weymouth F. W. FULLER, F.A.I., 

Auctioneer, Valuer, Hotel Broker and House 
Agent, 61, St. Thomas Street. Tel. No. 65. 



Whitstable and 
Tankerton-on-Sea 



J. T. REEVES & SON, 

Leading House & Estate Agents. 

Telephone No. 69. 



WINDERMERE * m£« 

ENGLISH LAKES. Leadmg House ^Estate Asrent, 

'Phone 91 Windermere. List Free. Lake Rd., Windermere. 

Gt. Yarmouth 

(See page 68) 






' ■■ 



7 2 



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HANDY REFERENCE BOOKS 

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Mrs. BEETON'S CAKE MAKING 

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■-zm 



Coll 



eses 



an( 



Schools 



irectory. 





74 



Index 



INDEX 



Carisbrooke 
Cowes 

Deal 

Eastbourne 
Littlehampton 
Llandrindod Wells 
Newport, I.W. 
Porthcawl... 

Ryde 

St. Leonards 

Sandown 

Seaford 

Shanklin 

Shoreham 

Swanage . . 

Ventnor 



page-- 

••• 75- 

••• 75- 

•• 75' 

... 75. 

... 75- 

••• 75 

••• 75 

••• 75 

••• 75 

••• 75 

••• 75 

... 76 

.... 7 6 

... 76 

... 76 

... 76 



Colleges and Schools 75 

Carisbrooke, I. of W.-CARISBROOKE HOUSE $$& 

Conducted by the Sisters of Providence of the Institute of Charity, under 
the Distinguished Patronage of the Lord Bishop of Portsmouth, \c. 
Pupils are prepared for Matriculation, Cambridge Locals, College of 
Preceptors, and Royal Academy of Music. 

Particulars from The SISTER SUPERIOR. 

Cowes-ST. BEDE'S SloEF^^Sii^^ 

years of age. Separate Departments. A Few Boarders are received.— 
preferably for Entire Charge Healthv. Playing Field. Climate mild, 
but invigorating. Principal, Miss BLANCHE MANLEY (Registered). 
Assisted by a Competent Staff. . . _ 

Deal, Kent-GUELPH HOUSE SCHOOL. ^ & &? ?S 

position, close to Sea. 1 he School course includes all the usual Subjects 
for a thorough & up-to-date Education. Entire charge of Indian and 
Colonial children. Principal, Miss ETHEL RICHES, Cambridge Higher 
Local, C.P. 

Eastbourne-SCHOOL OF DOMESTIC ECONOMY, fe£"g: 

Practical Instruction in Plain, High-class & Invalid Cookery ; also sub- 
jects of Domestic Economy. For particulars, Miss RANDALL, Principal. 

Littlehampton-ST. HILDA'S School for Girls -, a A ss agsj 

with Moderate Fees. Old-established and highly recommended. 

Particulars and Prospectus from The PRINCIPAL. 

IlflnflriTiilftrt Wollc - llanyre hall preparatory school. 

L1M1U1111UUU. II CllO In own grounds, with playing field. Elec. light. 
Modern sanitation. Unrivalled Climate. Boys from 8 to 14 J prepared 
for Public Schools. Principal : H. G. POTTS, M.A. 

Newport, I. of W.-BRAUNSTONE HOUSE SCHOOL. H 

& Jar. Boys. Thoroughly up-to-date. High-class modem education. 
Outdoor games encouraged. All particulars from The PRINCIPALS. 

Porthcawl-ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL. £«&!* ^SSFS 

Delicate and Backward Children. House Overlooking Bristol Channel. 
Stands in Own Grounds, 10 acres. G. LEWIS, M.A., Oxon, Headmaster. 

I. of W.-RYDE COLLEGE. ^fOTA^SS 1 ' 

GEORGE ST. Modern Equipment & Tuition. Large Gymnasium on Sea 
Front. Tennis, Hockey, Netball, &c. Principal, Mrs. E. MATTHEWS. 

Ryde, I. of Wight-ST. WmxirtZrtggStS; 

Prepared for the Public Schools and the Royal Navy. List of Referees 
and Prospectus on application to Principal, R. J. LEGGE, B.A., Camb- 

St. Leonards-WEST WmkEXBSttVBSZ 

Sea Front. Open-air methods. Home comforts. Entire charge under- 
taken where parents are abroad. Principal: Miss RICHARDSON. 

Sandown, I. of W.- l 'BRUNTSFIELD. n -f^ G D ^ L \ s X°h I : 

class Boarding School with Kindergarten. Standing in its Own Grounds, 
overlooking Sea. Prospectus on application to 
Miss MITCHELL, Principal. 

COMMENCE THE JOURNEY WITH 

THE WINDSOR MAGAZINE 

AT ALL BOOKSTALLS AND BOOKSHOPS. 



Ryde 



7<? Colleges and Schools _■ 

SEAWRD LADIES' COLLEGE, Sussex -t^f^S 

ern improvement, and the education of highest standard. Pleasantly and 
healthily situated, : ■ ■ - Prospectus from PRINCIPAL. 

Seaford-DOWNS SCHOOL ^rLflo^ ftiSS 

Climate. Accommodation lor 100 girls. 
Principal, Miss LUCRETIA CAMERON. 

SHANKLIN, I. of W.-UPPER CHINE 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS- Beautiful Climate. Thorough Education. 
Fully Qualified Staff. Prospectus from The PRINCIPAL. 

Shoreham, nr. Brighton-Grammar School^ "SSSSSSt 

Professional Life. All Exams. Special attention to backward boys. 
Home Comforts. Pro spectus & Vacancies, apply HEADMASTER. 

SWANAGE-ST. LEONARD'S Boarding and Day School 

f(\V Hfrlo Fully Quatifred Staffr Particulars from 

Wl UlllJ. The, PRINCIPAL. 

Swanage-SUNNYDOWN ^^J^gg* b£& 

Air. Physical Development receives Special Care. Tennis, Swimming, 
&c. Entire charge of Pupils, fr. abroad. Prospectus from PRINCIPAL . 

Ventnor, i.w. BELMONT SCHOOL 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR BOYS. Preparation for Boyi, 
between the ages of Ojand I4i for the Public Schools and the Royal 
Navy. . Magnificent Situation. Climate Unsurpassed. Entire 
charge taken of Bovs from Abroad. — - ■ — r 

'Phone Ventnor 127. Rev. A. E. KIRIvLAND, M.A., Headmaster. 



77 



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SHIPS FOR ALL 

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Editor of " Merchant Ships of the World," &c. 

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With Introduction by J. A. Fleming; M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S.," 
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- A comprehensive, clearly written, '• up-to-dafe treatise, 
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SCIENCE FOR ALL 

In this volume some ot the greatest living authorities place 
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of the Roval Society,- and contributions by Sir Arthur E. 
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College, Cambridge; Dr. Andrew CD. Crommelin, B.A., 
D.Sc, F.R.A.S., Roval Observatory, Greenwich; Dr. Swale 
Vincent, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.S.E., Professor of Physiology in 
the University of London, and others. 

From all Booksellers. 
WARD, LOCK & CO., LTD., Salisbury Square, London, E.C.4 



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